Bois d'arc stock?

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smoothshooter

50 Cal.
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That stuff is super dense and heavy. Lasts forever, but heavy.

Don’t know how many different kinds of hedge trees there are, but the kind I am familiar with produces the 4” to 5” hedge “ apples “.
I know of hedge corner posts that were set in the ground in the 1910’s and 1920’s that were still good fence posts in the 1980’s and the part in the ground had not rotted badly, and may still be good today.
 
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Osage is all the same, there are male and female trees withe females being the only ones that drop fruit. Every now and then you will find an osage tree without thorns. I cut a beautiful tree once, when I got it on the ground I noticed it didn't have any thorns and decided it was mulberry, it split out into perfect knot free, straight staves, I gave all the staves away. I went back to the same area the next year and noticed the "mulberry" stump had put out a lot of sprouts, all of which were covered up with thorns, I had found a thornless osage tree, not a mulberry tree.

The tree in the above pictures is also a thornless osage tree, this makes only two them that I have run across.
 
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Not for gunstocks!! Don't do it. I've worked lots of it and I have logs bigger then you can reach around. Great for knife scales and tools. Also for accents and bows. It's hard to see the grain flow and it will split out. I would like to try on the c and c though.
 
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After it has aged a few years as a fence post it is almost impossible to drive a staple into it. It is much easier to use a wrap of wire to hold up the barbed wire. I wouldn’t want to carve on it for a gunstock.
 

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