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Beeswax and Olive Oil

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Cannon
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With lanolin, olive oil and beeswax mixtures I've found it best to cool it quickly like pouring it out on a cookie sheet to prevent the solidification of the wax from pushing the oil to the center of a container. In a can the center will be softer because of less wax content, the outer perimeter harder.
 

Carbon 6

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In a can the center will be softer because of less wax content, the outer perimeter harder.
I have never experienced that issue, Not saying it couldn't happen, just that it's never happened to me. Something to keep an eye out for though.
 
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BEESWAX MUST BE MELTED OVER INDIRECT HEAT SUCH AS A DOUBLE BOILER.

NEVER EVER(!!!) MELT BEESWAX IN A MICROWAVE OVEN!!!!

Doing so can and WILL cause a severe fire if the beeswax ignites, and as there is no way to accurately measure the temperature more often than not it will catch fire!!
 

Griz44Mag

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BEESWAX MUST BE MELTED OVER INDIRECT HEAT SUCH AS A DOUBLE BOILER.

NEVER EVER(!!!) MELT BEESWAX IN A MICROWAVE OVEN!!!!

Doing so can and WILL cause a severe fire if the beeswax ignites, and as there is no way to accurately measure the temperature more often than not it will catch fire!!
Odd - I have been melting beeswax in a microwave for years. Never had any issues.
Only run the microwave for 30 seconds at a time and check your wax. Don't be silly and set it for several minutes and then go take the dog for a walk or something. If you leave it in too long it will turn brown because it is reaching the burning point. Stop WAY before that happens.
Using a microwave is for heating is no different than lighting a match and holding it. You have to pay attention and stop BEFORE it burns you....
If you try to heat up a TV dinner and leave it in for twice the time it needs you will have an issues as well.

So CAN and WILL are not the same thing. Yes you CAN use a microwave. Used improperly it MAY cause a fire.
 

Carbon 6

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BEESWAX MUST BE MELTED OVER INDIRECT HEAT SUCH AS A DOUBLE BOILER.
I melt mine without one, over a propane camp stove in very small quantity in a heavy aluminum pan while holding the pan the entire time to control the heat level. I never set it down on the stove, especially if I need to walk away from it. I do this outside too.
Beeswax melts around 145 F and has a flash point around 400 F. A heavy pan will absorb and redistribute the heat more evenly than a thin pan will, reducing the chance of burning. The wax is most vulnerable to overheating when you first start melting and once all the wax has all melted.

A double boiler is highly recommended as insurance against stupidity and inattentiveness.
 

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NEVER EVER(!!!) MELT BEESWAX IN A MICROWAVE OVEN!!!!
Despite having seen it done, I think this is good advice. Microwaves heat very unevenly. Often when beeswax is melted in the microwave it is in the tiny bead form which makes it melt easier.
Since you can't use metal in a microwave you have to be careful about the choice of container. wax can easily exceed the melting temp of many plastics resulting in a container failure.
 

Kansas Jake

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In the microwave with a glass or pyrex container. I also follow the 30 second rule. When it starts to melt, stir, nuke it, stir, nuke it some more etc. until mostly melted. As noted, if you aren't going to be attentive and be there the whole time, don't do it.
 

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A double boiler is highly recommended as insurance against stupidity and inattentiveness.
Where a double boiler is definitely required is for things like candle making where you need to maintain a specific temp over a long period of time.

Lube making is pretty much melt, mix and cool, but if any additional ingredients to your recipe are temp sensitive then a double boiler is the way to go.
It also works good for large quantities because you don't have to watch it constantly.
 

RjSixgun

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I just use a cast iron frying pan!
no need to over complicate it.

-Take an empty tin and fill half with sweet oil, then put in beeswax till its full. Place the tin on a cast iron pan and heat over a low flame. As the oil heats up, it melts the wax.
When the wax is melted remove it from the heat, give it a stir then remove the tin can and let cool.

no need for a double boiler, yer just heating up the oil enough to melt the wax..... you aint cooking it nor boiling it!!
 
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Well after a comment on never using a microwave i thought i would give it a go last night out in the yard (for safety).
My microwave lives in the barn and has only ever been used to process old beeswax cakes from the hives and for mixing wax and olive oil.
I have been doing so for twenty years but you can always learn something new.

So i spent the evening blasting on max power for max time in the micrwave beeswax and a mix of beeswax and oil....nothing but hot melted wax.

I will continue as i have for the last twenty years. I can only presume the comment about it not being safe and causing fire was heresay based on no direct knowledge?
 

Timber Wolf

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whir does one get bees wax? and I know it comes from a bee!
After striking out finding any locally at the crafty stores, I web-searched and found it from the china-mart. Free shipping to my house for a pound of the little beads. Should be a lifetime supply for my needs, it is resting on the bottom shelf of the fridge as we speak.
 

FishDFly

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"it is resting on the bottom shelf of the fridge as we speak."


Why in the fridge?
 

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dave951,and Griz44Mag, guys thanks' for responding to my question, with an answer.
 

toot

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I have melted mine before in the winter on top of my wood stove in an steel / tin an the type that peas come's in. a real hard metal can. but as said KEEP YOURE EYE ON IT, and take it off when it is to your liking. and if you over heat it will burn and stink.
 
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