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Beaded Strike-A-Light Pouch

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I thought I'd try my hand at making a beaded strike-a-light pouch. I started about 5 times and ripped out all the stitching before I finally got the hang of it. My first beading project, no laughing allowed :). It's quite an involved process. There's a lot of strategy in choosing where to start and stop the bead lines, and how to lay down the bead lines. Beads are heavy, this little pouch has some weight!

Black felt - all the beads were applied to the felt, except the edge beading
Buckskin - front and flap
Veg-tan leather 8 oz. - back
8/0 pony beads
Red cotton floss - tassels
Nylon beading thread Size F - to apply the beads to felt
Linen thread - to stitch the flap to the back

7 inches long
4 inches wide

I applied the beads to the felt. I used my wife's hand-stitching hoop for this. Works best if you trace the pattern on the felt with a silver Sharpie pen, especially for straight lines.

I cut out the leather. Stiff 8 oz. veg tan for the back, soft buckskin for the front and flap.

After the beading was complete, I sewed the felt to the flap using an edge beading stitch, then sewed the flap to the back using linen thread.

I used my wife's cross-stitching floss to make the tassels.

Using a stitching chisel, I hammered stitching holes along the edges of the stiff 8 oz. leather back. Then I stitched three layers together - front felt, front buckskin, and back - using an edge beading stitch. The tassels were sewn in during this process.

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I think it looks fine, Harry. I like to look at old Indian artifacts, and there are thousands of them online, in museum and auction-house websites. Wealthy collectors and prestigious museums tend to go for perfection, the best of the best, but I would say the majority of the beaded artifacts that have survived show plenty of minor imperfections. This, in my opinion, only adds to the appeal. These things were made by real people.

Your pouch looks terrific!

Notchy Bob
 
I think it looks fine, Harry. I like to look at old Indian artifacts, and there are thousands of them online, in museum and auction-house websites. Wealthy collectors and prestigious museums tend to go for perfection, the best of the best, but I would say the majority of the beaded artifacts that have survived show plenty of minor imperfections. This, in my opinion, only adds to the appeal. These things were made by real people.
I agree with Notchy Bob. I do a lot of beading and have looked at numerous samples of original work. Most were not perfect. If you continue beading, you will find that the smaller the bead the better they lay out. Also, at least for me, it is more difficult to do applique than lazy stitch. If I am trying to get a smoother flow of the line, after I get the beads stitched in place I run a continual length of thread through that string of beads and it help align them. All in all, I think you should be proud of your work.
 
I think it looks fine, Harry. I like to look at old Indian artifacts, and there are thousands of them online, in museum and auction-house websites. Wealthy collectors and prestigious museums tend to go for perfection, the best of the best, but I would say the majority of the beaded artifacts that have survived show plenty of minor imperfections. This, in my opinion, only adds to the appeal. These things were made by real people.

Your pouch looks terrific!

Notchy Bob

".....but I would say the majority of the beaded artifacts that have survived show plenty of minor imperfections. This, in my opinion, only adds to the appeal. These things were made by real people."

Yep, I far prefer that genre of reproductions when it comes to period artifacts.
 
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