Beaded Possibles Bags or Shot pouches?

Discussion in 'Historically Accurate Equipment' started by Armando, Jan 10, 2020.

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  1. Jan 10, 2020 #1

    Armando

    Armando

    Armando

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    Trying to do some research on hunting pouches or possibles bags I could make with my elementary skills that may have been beaded.

    Did bag makers ever embellish their stuff, especially the rough-hewn hand-made ones, with Native American influenced beadwork?
     
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  2. Jan 11, 2020 at 2:35 AM #2

    tenngun

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    By the middle of the eighteenth century some eastern tribes started doing beadwork on personal bags. Much was appliqué and European floral influenced. Some seems to have been made for trade with whites.
    Western tribes early in nineteenth century tended to make blocks of a single color and geometric designs were worked in quill.
    Early in nineteenth century most beads traded were larger and didn’t lend self well to designs. It’s about 1840 that smaller beads started replacing quill work. It’s in the 60s we start to see more elaborate geometric designs put on general items. By the 70s big sprays of beadwork are made for trade to whites, and the 80s western floral is seen and we see it on reservation clothing.
    So, would it be seen on a bag used by whites. Possibly. We shouldn’t forget beads were created for European embroidery before the Americas were discovered. The geometric beadwork designs that we associate with Indian beadwork really starts in the 1840-50s and most designs are reservation period.
    Floral would be common for whites
    And I would wonder about long winter nights.
    Sailors did fancy work at sea. Embroidery, macrame, scrimshaw, snuff boxes or such carved out of salt meat, ect. I would hazard that long dank days might lead a board frontiersman from playing with beads.
     
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  3. Jan 13, 2020 at 2:55 AM #3

    Stophel

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    If you had Indian connections, you MIGHT have had a beaded shot bag. Robert Rogers is famously illustrated with one.

    Otherwise, most likely not.
     
  4. Jan 13, 2020 at 1:35 PM #4

    dragnetbill

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    I just finished reading, War on the Run The Epic Story of Robert Rogers and the Conquest of America's First Frontier (2009 Bantam Books), by John F. Ross. The book appears to be well researched and footnoted. Ross states in his introduction that other than a reference to his height no period writings ever gave a physical description of Rogers. He states that all portraits of Rogers are artists' fabrications created after his death. However, an engraved print, of Rogers, by Thomas Hart was published in 1776 in London. It shows Rogers with what appears to be a beaded bag.
    I couldn't find much information this morning (internet) on Thomas Hart and his print making. However, the print is depicting Rogers at the time of the FIW and not 1776.
    I suppose it is possible that the beaded bag in the print could be accurate to what Rogers carried during FIW; on the other hand maybe Thomas Hart was the Bob Ross (painter with a PBS show on how to paint; famous for saying, "You want a tree right here? Lets put a tree there.") of the 18th Century and may have said, "You know, a beaded bag would look good on Rogers; let put a beaded bag right here."
     
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