Battle of Monmouth Battlefield pics Part2

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Jim Martin

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Here are some more Monmouth Battlefield pics:

Plaque at the spot of Washington's "conversation" with Lee.

Close up of Plaque

Fence line where the 1st Pennsylvania Brigade and 2 battalions of "picked men" were detailed to hold this fence line at the base of the hill. Their purpose was to protect the Continental artillery from a British attack from the east (you are looking north in this pic). Private Joseph Plum Martin of the 8th Connecticut, who had served in Lee's command during the morning part of the battle, was among these picked men. He wrote in his memoirs, "When we had secured our retreat, the artillery formed a line of pieces upon a long piece of elevated ground. Our detachment formed directly in front of the artillery, as a covering party, so far below on the declivity of the hill that the pieces could play over our heads. And here we waited the approach of the enemy, should he see fit to attack us."

View from the hill where General William Alexander (aka Lord Stirling) commenced his "cannonade"

"Shot and Shells flying as thick as hail!"
Maker where the 3 hour cannonade took place in previous pic.

Position occupied by the left wing of Stirling's line. One of the units here was Proctor's battery of Pennsylvania artillery. Among Proctor's artilleryman was a gunner named William Hays, a young Irishman who had enlisted in Bristol, PA in May 1777. During the battle, the debilitating heat (96 degrees in the shade) and British projectiles thinned Proctor's gun crew. Eager to help Mary Hays was given the job of running ammunition to the guns from supply boxes located 25 yards to the rear. Thus the "MYTH of Molly Pitcher" was born. Many of the details of Molly's exploits are difficult to prove since in the process they came entwined with the story of another Revolutionary war heroine named Margaret Corbin ("Captain Molly"), who helped to fire a cannon after her husband was killed at the battle of Fort Washington. "Molly Pitcher's" husband William Hays survived the Battle of Monmouth, and he and his wife Mary went to reside in Carlisle, PA after the war. William Hays died in 1787.

The story of the Myth marker.

Marker about William and Mary Hays, at the possible site of the water spring where water may have been carried back to the gun crews. This is an "overlook platform" on the side of the ravine where the stream runs.

Overlook Platform for spring.

The fence line, orchard and swale that sheltered the 42nd Regiment (aka the Royal Highland Regiment or "Black Watch".) When the Highlanders' commander saw Continental Colonel Joseph Ciley and his men (who had been sent to "drive those rascals from the orchard) advancing down the slope from Stirling's position, he formed his men to to confront the Continentals but soon had to withdraw out of the orchard south along the fence line. Colonel Ciley felt that he would nay be able to overtake the enemy on account of the fences and apple trees, so he ordered several platoons to advance and "keep them in play". Joseph Plum Martin relates that, "We pursued without order. As I Passed through the orchard I saw a number of the enemy lying under the trees killed by our field piece."

"Eyewitness" to the Battle of Monmouth. The Sutfin Farm House still standing. The Sutfin Farm was right smack in the middle of the Battle. The house dates from 1730.

Sutfin House.

Site of the Battle of the Parsonage

Marker for the Battle of the Parsonage


Tennent Church

Village Inn in Englishtown, NJ. site of the first hearing in the "Court-Martial of General Charles Lee"

Ladies and Gentlemen this concludes our picture presentation.

Cumberland
 

Macon Due

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Great pictures! Thank you very much. It would be nice if the farm house could be restored [wouldn't it be neat to live in it?]
Macon
 

Jim Martin

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The house is in real bad shape. There are only a window or two left that have not been covered up. What you have is plywood sheets painted to look like the windows. Here is some more info on the Sutfin House and Farm:
The house dates to the 1730s, with later additions from the 1820s and 1840s. An older section dated to the 1720s was torn down in the 1820s. The house is one of 4 buildings in the park that were present at the time of the battle. It is in great need of repair and so is not open to the public. In 1778 this farm was owned by Derick Sutfin, who lived there with his wife Mary and 4 of their 8 children (ages 16 to 24). Besides the main house, the farm also featured a large "Dutch" barn and a weaving house.

Macon you are right though, it would be awesome to bring this house "back to life."

The information and the work done out here on the Monmouth Battlefield is a direct result from the hard work of an organization called, " Friends of Monmouth Battlefield, Inc."
Think I'll join the group, the cost is only $20 a year for an Individual Membership. I got more that $20 worth of enjoyment just walking the historic trails!

Cumberland
 

mikee51848

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I've been there a few times as a reenactor but I hadn't seen these pics. How far are they from the visitor center? Monmouth is a real gem.
 

Jim Martin

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The Visitors Center sits on Combs Hill. The Battlefield runs north away from Combs Hill, making Combs Hill the right flank of the Continental lines. The area around the Sutfin House is on the north side of Route 522 which runs east and west. The culvert bridge on Route 522 is the modern version of an existing bridge that both the British and the American Forces had to cross over.

Here is a pic of the Battlefield map:
 

mikee51848

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I remember seeing a documentary a few years ago about the battlefield, how they "discovered" the other side of the road. And from digs they determined the lines of each side by the size of the musket balls found.
 

Enfield1

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I really appreciate you posting these photos. Both the photos and the captions that you wrote to describe what we were looking at were excellent. I read Newt Gingrich's novel,"Valley Forge". I don't want to spoil it for anybody, but the description of the Battle of Monmouth at the end of the book will make you feel as though you were there after you have read it. Your photos tied it all together for me. Thank you. :thumbsup:
 

Comrade Coffin

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I notice that the plaque picture above talks about a victory. I was under the impression that the battle was inconclusive - both sides claimed vistory but in reality neither really prevailed to any significant degree.
 

ihuntsnook

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Nice photos! I was there a year and a half ago and was very impressed with the park.
 
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