Barrel Channel Issue on a New Stock

Discussion in 'The Gun Builder's Bench' started by waarp8nt, Jan 25, 2020.

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  1. Jan 27, 2020 #21

    sawyer04

    sawyer04

    sawyer04

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    The making of tools is essential to get desired cuts and scrapes. Flea market chisels and old files are excellent tools to modify to scrapers. A simple propane torch will throw enough heat to smith the cheap and broken tools. Inexpensive grinder, stone, a cheap vise, file and emery paper and you are in business. I would visit you tube on heating, annealing and tempering tools with a propane torch.
    Sure, takes time, when I began building guns I had very little in the way of tools, probably more than the mountain gunsmiths of the 1800's. A coffee can of broken, rusted chisels and a propane torch ( the most expensive of the lot. I had an old brace and bits from the tool shed and a broken carpenters hammer.
    Just remember, what looks like a bunch of wood to hog out may just be a few thousands.
     
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  2. Jan 27, 2020 #22

    Col. Batguano

    Col. Batguano

    Col. Batguano

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    Yes to the above. Get your barrel closer to finished dimensions first though. Draw file it and sand it a little bit. As stated above, it's easier to make the hole fit the part than the other way around.

    You also have to remember that finish in the end is going to tighten things up too. Water based stains (or those containing water like AF) will swell the wood. Seeing that it is winter time, this too is the driest time of the year. A tight fit now will be a looser fit come July and August. I notice it on some of my inlays on different guns that were finished at different times of the year. Guns that were finished in August the inlays stand a little proud in February. The opposite is true for those finished in February.

    You cannot stop water vapor gas exchange through most finishes. Only slow it down. Seasonal wood movement is as old as wood and seasons themselves.
     
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  3. Jan 28, 2020 #23

    waarp8nt

    waarp8nt

    waarp8nt

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    I believe great minds think alike. I have been purchasing files and chisels to re-purpose for quite some time. I own a Oxygen Acetylene torch and have made a few springs for muzzleloader locks. I feel comfortable with most aspects of metal working and re-purposing tools.

    At this time my thoughts are prep the barrel, check the fit and make a scraper. Then proceed with caution.

    This is my main fear. To remove too much wood and ruin the stock or make it look like an unsightly. I'm somewhat of a perfectionist and very critical of my own work, that being said I have never considered myself a wood worker. Something I'm hoping to change. Thank you for your advise!

    We deal with a fair amount of humidity here in Southern Illinois in the summer months. I also burn firewood, so its likely as dry as it will be here at home. Good point, something I will certainly need pay attention too.
     
  4. Jan 28, 2020 #24

    Scota@4570

    Scota@4570

    Scota@4570

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    For inletting black use a big fat sharpie marker. Greasy stuff makes a mess and false marks. To do a perfect job it will still lightly touch. The sharpie inks rubs off under pressure, not just a light touch. It works much better.

    An undersized octagon shaped block with sandpaper stuck to is it my go to for final tweaking. IF you mess up, do not despair. As the final outside stock shaping gets close, stop. Wet the stock, install the barrel, wrap it in surgical tubing. Let it dry a couple of days. You will find you gaps are gone.
     
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  5. Jan 28, 2020 #25

    torpedo

    torpedo

    torpedo

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    Zonie uses the same method I do, works great. Just keep it square and go slow, check fit often.
     
  6. Feb 4, 2020 #26

    Cory Joe Stewart

    Cory Joe Stewart

    Cory Joe Stewart

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    I use a very sharp one inch chisel. Scraping will work but be careful of grain transitions. When you hit an are of more open grain the scrapper may take more material leaving a gap. I think it can also be hard to keep it aligned with the side of the channel. When I say use a chisel I mean you are slicing straight down. Using hand pressure, not a mallet.

    Cory Joe Stewart
     
  7. Feb 13, 2020 #27

    Felix the Cat

    Felix the Cat

    Felix the Cat

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    Most of the stuff I do has round barrels, but the principle is the same..

    I have made a series of what I call "scorp" scrapers out of spring steel strip (has to be spring steel - mild steel will not harden!). Bend 90 degrees an inch from the end, grind back to an edge and harden and temper to straw. Most of mine are half moon shaped, but I have some flat and v shaped ones as well. You can also bolt sharpened penny washers to lengths of studding ( I think you call it allthread in your part of the world?)"

    I use a kerosine soaked stick to put smoke on the underside of the barrel, and then press on to the stock.. use a scorp to scrape away the marks by pulling it either up or down the channel (one way will cut better, depending on how the grain lies.). You can use layout blue (or artist's oil paint) but I like smoke.. it is thinner and more traditional in my part of the world! You will not achieve full contact, but as you remove the high spots, the number of contact points will increase. Once you have points of contact about every quarter inch, you are probably close enough. Movement of the wood over time will eventually produce a perfect contact. What you are looking for is perfect contact along the visible edge between the metal and the wood. Bites and gaps along these edges do not look good. What happens beneath the stock is less important, providing it is not binding..

    You can use an ordinary flat chisel to scrape across the grain, but there is a danger you will split it out. As you have an almost finished stock, do not be tempted to cut wood with a shaped cutter. The most you need to do is scrape or pare. You can use backed abrasives, but unless you are familiar with this technique, there is a danger of rounding edges. Abrasives cut much faster than most folk appreciate.. NEVER use a rasp for internal fitting. These are used for external shaping. Be very careful near edges or end grain as you can blow out chips and chunks..!

    Make haste slowly, unlike metal you cannot use a TIG to put back wood you have taken off!
     

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