Bannock on a stick recipe?

Discussion in 'Camp Cooking' started by NW Territory Woodsman, May 21, 2019.

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  1. May 21, 2019 #1

    NW Territory Woodsman

    NW Territory Woodsman

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    Does anyone have a simple historic bannock on a stick recipe that would be good for trekking? I've made bannock in the oven before, but the recipe would be just to much/big to carry around.
    Plus tell any tips or tricks for cooking the bannock on a stick, as I have never cooked any kind of bread over the fire, eccept maby flapjacks.
     
  2. May 22, 2019 #2

    tenngun

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    Flour, salt and enough water to make a stiff paste, wrap around stick and twirl till cooked.
    A teaspoon of baking powder to a cup of flour will make it puffy. Dry buttermilk flour added about a third of a cup per cup of flour gives a nice flavor.
    A little butter or bacon grease added to the dough is tasty too.
    You can premix your stuff dry and carry it in a bag with a little water in the field.
    Bisquick or some such is handy and pre mixed.
    Corn meal can substitute for flour and it’s very historic and tasty. Steel cut oatmeal is also very historic and tasty.
    Making flour with baking powder and butter rolled, folded,rolled ,folded, rolled then twirled on stick makes it layerd and flakie.
     
  3. May 22, 2019 #3

    tenngun

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    You can also make a stiff dough and patty it flat, cooking on a rock near the fire, or ona board stood by the fire.
     
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  4. May 22, 2019 #4

    NW Territory Woodsman

    NW Territory Woodsman

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    Just not a rock from the creek!;)
     
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  5. May 22, 2019 #5

    Nyckname

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    Townsend demonstrated cooking on a Bannock board,
     
  6. May 22, 2019 #6

    Loyalist Dave

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    :thumb:

    I always found that straight cornmeal or oatmeal = a lot of dough falling off into the fire. So a little wheat four mixed in with the corn meal or oat meal helps make it stick, and a little rye flour instead of the wheat and it will stick to the stick quite well. Just pay attention that the flour doesn't get "musty".

    A green hardwood stick, hickory, oak, or maple, etc with the bark peeled off where you apply the dough is another key. The bark area of the tree can have all sorts of stuff ON it, and well as little critters IN it. So you remove the bark. (Saw some scouts a few years ago trying this with pine (yuk). )

    As Tenngun wrote, your hold the stick and rotate it to toast the dough, OR you can jamb the end of the stick, opposite the dough, into the ground, and turn it every so often.

    You can try this at home over an electric burner on the stove if you have an electric stove, OR you can try it after you're done cooking on the grill. That way you can find the recipe and water amount that works best for you ;)


    STICK BREAD WRONG.jpg STICK BREAD RIGHT.jpg


    LD
     
  7. May 22, 2019 #7

    kansas_volunteer

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    You might try a Hungarian chimney cake recipe. Just Google it.

    Don't use willow for your stick. It leaves a bad taste. Chew your stick like a beaver to determine its flavor. Any sort of wild cherry might be nice.
     
  8. May 23, 2019 #8

    Loyalist Dave

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    I wondered about yeast, since the addition of baking powder or soda isn't really right for my time period. What I usually end up with is something akin to non-rising pretzel dough toasted on the stick. That Hungarian stuff is pretty tasty sounding. Not sure if these guys are going to go for the wait time needed to use yeast (not to mention the eggs and the milk) , especially if they use an historic yeast. Ale yeast, the yeast of the 18th century, can take as much as 12 hours to properly rise. ;)

    LD
     
    Last edited: May 23, 2019
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  9. May 23, 2019 #9

    NeilMacleod

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    Well if you used a "Natural" beer then you could mix it up in the evening and cook it up in the morning.
     
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  10. May 23, 2019 #10

    Loyalist Dave

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    Yes you could, and I think that's how yeast bread was done especially in summertime, but most folks I think twisting bread on a stick want it sooner than that. :D

    LD
     
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  11. May 23, 2019 #11

    Nyckname

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    The Romans discovered yeast rising bread when they saw the Scots skimming the foam off of beer to make bread.
     
  12. May 23, 2019 #12

    Nyckname

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    Wheat and water does make a fine paste.
     
  13. May 23, 2019 #13

    tenngun

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    I think it’s a might earlier. Egyptians were making beer and raised bread at the dawn of civilization. On passover night the Israelites had to make unleavened bread. This may not have been written down for some centuries but predates Rome. There is a YouTube video of a man making sour dough Roman bread... ancient recipes not far removed from sourdough today.
     
  14. May 23, 2019 #14

    Eterry

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    Down here in the South we make what's called a hoe cake. I think some call it a Johnny cake.
    Farm hands would take the handle out of their I-hoe. If you've ever chopped a crop you know the hoe is bright and shiny.
    Put it on a fire, get it hot, pour on the batter, just like a pancake.
    I've never had or seen bannock... could you do likewise with a 'hawk or axe head?
    Just thinking...
     
    Last edited: May 23, 2019
  15. May 23, 2019 #15

    Nyckname

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    I believe their leavening was something naturally occurring on the grain or in the air.

    Currently, factories producing kosher for Passover matzoh have a tight time limit, maybe seventeen minutes, between when the water hits the flour and when the last of the dough in that batch hits the oven, to prevent natural rising, or the whole batch must be thrown away and the equipment cleaned.
     
  16. May 23, 2019 #16

    Loyalist Dave

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    Yeah it's called yeast, and it's in the air. ;) All brewing did from batch to batch is establish the local wild yeast as a dominant strain in that area. Same for the bread.

    LD
     
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  17. May 23, 2019 #17

    Nyckname

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    Yeah, that "something" shouldn't've been in there.
     
  18. May 23, 2019 #18

    Loyalist Dave

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    A proper bannock is done with oats from what I've read and learned, and is a sort of very large, unleavened oatmeal pancake, browned in melted fat in a pan or baked on a rock. Well toasted they aren't that bad, and taste much better after you've been without any food for about 24 hours.

    Not sure you'd want to use a 'hawk that way, especially since most were soft iron with a hardened steel bit put into place for the edge. Furthermore you'd probably be making ash-cakes anyway.

    LD
     
  19. May 23, 2019 #19

    Loyalist Dave

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    LOL yeah changes the sentence a bit..., sorta like the difference a comma can make, such as in :

    "Let's eat, Grandma!", and "Let's eat Grandma!" :confused:

    LD
     
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  20. May 24, 2019 #20

    Eterry

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    Can you say Donner Party?
     
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