Arrow making was a art in it's self

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The native fletcher put a lot of work in making one. I would think most every one in the village had some skill in doing these.
 

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Most folks could do at least basics if needed. However that said Indians took much pride in their work. Most ‘basics’ were turned out by a master smith. While they didn’t have money in a westren sense they did have a thriving economy. And jobs could be very specialized.
All women could sew, but pottery making was a skill learned and traded inside the tribe.
Men tended to make points, bows and knifes or other weapons. Women may excel at art items.
Trade inside a village or band and even between bands was common
 

smo

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Here’s one I put together a few years ago..

Planning on killing a whitetail with it …..
If I ever get a roundtoit…

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Flint point was made by a Friend in Virginia…
Fletching was from a bird I killed & hand cut.

My first with a flint head….
 

Red Owl

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It's a subject well worth researching. I think some tribes used hollow reeds and fitted plugs at the end. The big deal was straightening the arrow and I think I read that every tribe had a few members who specialized in making arrows
 

waksupi

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It's a subject well worth researching. I think some tribes used hollow reeds and fitted plugs at the end. The big deal was straightening the arrow and I think I read that every tribe had a few members who specialized in making arrows
The local Flathead tribes made footed arrows as you describe. I have one here in my collection. It has been said, any stick can make a bow, but it takes skill to make a good arrow. I made many over the years for museum displays, movies, and collectors. I've not done any for some years, but recall I was getting $45 each even 30 years ago for museum grade arrows.
 

flntlokr

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It's a subject well worth researching. I think some tribes used hollow reeds and fitted plugs at the end. The big deal was straightening the arrow and I think I read that every tribe had a few members who specialized in making arrows
I would tthink that most would have been able to make or repair arrows at some level of expertise, but only a few would have outstanding skills, and they would be valued for that, and would be provided with the necessities of life by those who spent their time hunting rather than making the tools. Perhaps warriors who had been injured or crippled would develop their skills to become the band's armourer, thus providing a necessary service and remaining of value to the group.
 
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It's a subject well worth researching. I think some tribes used hollow reeds and fitted plugs at the end. The big deal was straightening the arrow and I think I read that every tribe had a few members who specialized in making arrows
I've made cane arrows, the cane has to be heat treated. They would build a fire in a long pit , cover the coals with dirt and put the arrows and any bow wood that needs drying on the dirt and cover that with more dirt and leave for a day or so to dry. I use buffalo horn for the nocks and metal trade points on the plugs. The point was the arrow point would penetrate and the shaft would fall of and be easy to be found and reused.
 

woodsnwater

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Here’s one I put together a few years ago..

Planning on killing a whitetail with it …..
If I ever get a roundtoit…

IMG-0799.jpg


IMG-0793.jpg


IMG-0781.jpg


Flint point was made by a Friend in Virginia…
Fletching was from a bird I killed & hand cut.

My first with a flint head….

Looks like a Kirk's corner notch point. The first quality head I ever found looked just like that.
 
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Almost like the one I found near Bird's fort in Arlington. Comanche attacks were often made there around Village Creek on the fort.

 

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deermanok

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In my younger years, I had a temporary job working as a courier.
One of my stops was at the business office of Yale University. Every day, I would arrive when they were closed for lunch, so I always had to kill an hour. Directly across the street was the Peabody Museum. I was always fascinated by the American Indian artifacts. One particular bow was actually made of 3 pieces of wood. One type for a riser and a different type for the limbs. They were all lashed together with sinue, I believe.
The arrows and quiver with it were excellently done. Whoever the maker was had great talent.
 

Loyalist Dave

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It's a subject well worth researching. I think some tribes used hollow reeds and fitted plugs at the end. The big deal was straightening the arrow and I think I read that every tribe had a few members who specialized in making arrows
My buddy grew up for a time in South America in the Amazon basin, and brought me some arrows made down there..., when he found out I was an anthropology/archaeology major. He had gone hunting with the local peoples, and they use really long arrows compared to my friend Ted and his North American versions. Ted thought his were better, but one of the men looked at his arrows and said, "How do you find them when you miss?" 😶

Ted decided then that they had been living in those jungles for too long not to know what works, and more importantly, what doesn't. So he said after that question he shut up and watched what they did to learn the "right" way.

One of the interesting things was how they fastened the points. They would prefer if the animal moves off after being hit, to track it after the head has parted from the shaft and remains in the animal, and the shaft has come free, and has been recovered.

LD
 

Tom A Hawk

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. They would prefer if the animal moves off after being hit, to track it after the head has parted from the shaft and remains in the animal, and the shaft has come free, and has been recovered.

LD
Rumor has it our Northeast Levanna points were also designed to detach after penetration. Some say they were "war points "

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LME

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I would tthink that most would have been able to make or repair arrows at some level of expertise, but only a few would have outstanding skills, and they would be valued for that, and would be provided with the necessities of life by those who spent their time hunting rather than making the tools. Perhaps warriors who had been injured or crippled would develop their skills to become the band's armourer, thus providing a necessary service and remaining of value to the group.
I read that the elderly were the arrow makers? I guess when they got the age I am they couldn't do some of the other things the tribe needed doing to exist so they made arrows and bows?
 

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