Ardesa Mountain Rifle

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Kansas Jake

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My Ardessa doesn't have a name or model on it and I was using the terms as related to a Hawken and not the TC style Hawken. Sorry for the confusion.
 

Notchy Bob

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Good score, brother!

I know about Ardesa, but have never heard of that particular model of rifle. It is a nice looking rifle. That trigger guard is nicely sculpted, and not overbuilt, as on some of the modern rifles. I like the clean look, without the cap-box. I find it interesting that the manufacturer took the trouble to fit an entry pipe in addition to a for end cap, like many of the finer rifles of the mid 19th century. Most of today's brass-mounted half stocks just have the nosecap, with a hole for the ramrod. The heavy barrel, a full inch across the flats is a plus in my opinion. Heavy barrels were the norm back in the day. I don't think I've seen inlays like those on a production built rifle of this type before.

I would just shoot it as it is. Maybe change to a fixed rear sight some day... Like you, I prefer them, but adjustable sights can be very practical. As for the finish, we know that many original Hawkens were blued. Time has changed the coloration to make us think they were all browned, and some were, but many of them were originally blued.

Another thing to consider is the resale value. If you find it's too heavy or doesn't fit you, and you want to resell it, refinishing will likely decrease its value. I know you don't have much in it, but I've never seen a rifle just like that one before, and I'm thinking it might be from a limited run. There's probably not much collector demand for those, but most people who buy guns want them as close to factory original as possible.

In any event, you got yourself a nice rifle!

Notchy Bob
 

Widows Son

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That was a good find and congratulations.
As mentioned already, Ardessa had/has intertwined links to CVA, Traditions, Jukar and Dikar.
And they are known to have excellent accuracy.
 

Mknight702

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I have an Ardessa in .45 that i paid too much for. Unless you need to hit what you are shooting at. Most accurate muzzleloader i own, and therefore one of the most fun to shoot.
mid 1970`s model.
I have an Ardesa Hawken in .451 with the 1:20 twist, shoots conical bullets through the same hole at 100m, I have shot steel at 200m but couldn't see where the shot was falling at 300m to adjust the sights properly. One day I want to see if I can take it out to 600yards, but need the ranges to open first!
 

toot

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A guy on a local gun exchange site had posted for sale a couple of .50 caliber muzzle loaders. One was an Ardesa mountain rifle made in Spain, and the other was a TC New Englander. I'd saved them in my box and was in the process of clearing it out with item that had sold when I noticed these two hadn't. For fun I made the guy an insanely low offer which I figured he would refuse. Much to my surprise, he accepted and now I'm the proud owner of a couple more cap locks. I'm curious about the Ardesa as I'd never heard of it before. Therefore, I'll post a couple pictures of it for your comments. Two things I want to do with it is to remove the modern (Thompson Center looking) rear sight and dovetail it for a traditional one, and remove what's left of the barrel bluing and brown it. Other than that it is has a solid walnut stock and a full, 1 inch thick 32 inch barrel. Needless to say, it is quite heavy. Obviously solidly built.
I for one like it. NO BELLS & WHISTLES!! nothing that is not needed!
 

Capnball

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AFAIK, while original J&S Hawken plains rifles had double keys, the CVA/Ardessa single key guns were called Hawken; the double key guns were called Mountain Rifles.
Learn something new every day here
Neil
 

Bucky

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Yes, this seems to be the Ardesa version of the CVA mountain rifle. Has a little more embellishment but the basic structure is that of the kind they supplied to CVA. Has anybody got an idea of the bore twist? Roundball friendly like the older CVAs or middle of the road 1:48?
 

Trot

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Other than that rear sight, I like that a lot better than the CVA Mountain rifle.
 

Bucky

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I agree about the sights. Well, if any of you guys are impressed enough with this rifle, it's twin is on Gunbroker right now..only it's in a .54!!. I saw it a few days ago and was tempted.......
 

Russ T Frizzen

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I agree about the sights. Well, if any of you guys are impressed enough with this rifle, it's twin is on Gunbroker right now..only it's in a .54!!. I saw it a few days ago and was tempted.......
That rifle has some notable differences from the CVA Mountain Rifle. The lock is very different from the usual "Maslin" style that CVA used and the nose cap/entry pipe area is much more elegantly developed. The CVA version generally used a maple stock. I've never seen one with a walnut stock before. I don't know what you have there, but it is definitely a cut above the CVA product in terms of style and finish. You did well.
 

Bucky

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Whoops, I meant it's twin is on Gunsinternational not Gunbroker, I try to be helpful and I still screw up....duh
 

Trot

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That rifle has some notable differences from the CVA Mountain Rifle. The lock is very different from the usual "Maslin" style that CVA used and the nose cap/entry pipe area is much more elegantly developed. The CVA version generally used a maple stock. I've never seen one with a walnut stock before. I don't know what you have there, but it is definitely a cut above the CVA product in terms of style and finish. You did well.
I agree 100%, about the only resemblance to a CVA Mountain rifle is that they are both half stock with 2 wedges.
 

mooman76

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I wanted a 36 cal for some time. I finally got one at a reasonable price. Turns out it was a Ardesa. I got it from a guy that bought it used and he said he never even fired it. Accuracy was poor when I got it, it literally destroyed patches. I lapped it some and kept shooting it and it did much better. Seems like every time I took it out it shot better. I think the guy fired it and sold it due to accuracy issues. Anyway, I kinda believe it was never even broken in yet. Rifling was crisp and I think had sharp edges.
Anyway it also has no markings saying model number but from some internet searching I believe it to be called a Ranger. I like it allot now that it shoots half way decent but I still have some work to do to improve accuracy. It's a fun little gun to shoot.
 

Pietro

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That rifle has some notable differences from the CVA Mountain Rifle.

The CVA version generally used a maple stock. I've never seen one with a walnut stock before.

FWIW, my CVA Premier Grade Mountain rifle has a walnut stock with a little fiddleback figure/graining near the butt plate

 

Treestalker

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Please send that pipe bomb off to be tested before you subject your face to the Spanish proof of only about 10,700lbs test. Just saying...
Since black powder is supposed to regularly generate 25/30 thousand pounds of pressure and U.S. Army tests back in the day achieved over 90,000lbs. of pressure with black powder they had Back Then, I'm leery of anything tested to such a low standard even though my first ML rifle was a CVA Kentucky. I guess since America has no proof houses, we should trust ourselves to the excellent reputations of foreign testing, and the forbearance of barrel steels.
 

Flinty Scot

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That's a fine looking rifle. The sights don't match the rest of it, in period or overall appearance.
A heavy barrelled .36 makes it even more attractive. I'd change them, but stop there & just shoot it.
Have fun.
 

Frontier's

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Cva never used ardesa. They used jukar and dikar. This rifle has zero in common with the cva mountain rifle. With that walnut stock and heavy barrel, they tip the scale at 10lbs, or close to it.
 

Hermanoshawken

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Hello. As I live in Spain I can give you some information about that Ardesa replica of the Hawken. That model and also in caliber 50 was the first rifle that I bought in 1988, when I was 25 years old. If it is a 50 caliber, it has a 66" twist. Therefore, it is a good rifle to shoot with a round ball, especially with not very high loads, since the groove is not very deep. At 50 meters it groups very well with 50 grains of black powder. Swiss No. 2 (3fff). Use 0.490 ball and 0.015" linen patch. And trade the rear sight for a semi-buckhorn. Walnut wood is of good quality and if it takes away the shine you can finish it with linseed oil, in a more natural way and with a very beautiful darker color. The nipple is metric thread 6x100. It is a very good heavy rifle for competitions for 50 meters (55 yards) or for hunting, but with a round bullet, because with a maxi bullet I don't think it will group well.
If the nipple does not transmit fire well, you may need to remove the side drum and trim it so that the fire from the nipple communicates well with the breech that closes the barrel. You can also change the side drum for a good quality steel one, like the one you sell for Spanish guns Track of the Wolf (from Dikar-CVA- and Ardesa -Traditions-).

Greetings from Spain.
 

Capnball

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Hello. As I live in Spain I can give you some information about that Ardesa replica of the Hawken. That model and also in caliber 50 was the first rifle that I bought in 1988, when I was 25 years old. If it is a 50 caliber, it has a 66" twist. Therefore, it is a good rifle to shoot with a round ball, especially with not very high loads, since the groove is not very deep. At 50 meters it groups very well with 50 grains of black powder. Swiss No. 2 (3fff). Use 0.490 ball and 0.015" linen patch. And trade the rear sight for a semi-buckhorn. Walnut wood is of good quality and if it takes away the shine you can finish it with linseed oil, in a more natural way and with a very beautiful darker color. The nipple is metric thread 6x100. It is a very good heavy rifle for competitions for 50 meters (55 yards) or for hunting, but with a round bullet, because with a maxi bullet I don't think it will group well.
If the nipple does not transmit fire well, you may need to remove the side drum and trim it so that the fire from the nipple communicates well with the breech that closes the barrel. You can also change the side drum for a good quality steel one, like the one you sell for Spanish guns Track of the Wolf (from Dikar-CVA- and Ardesa -Traditions-).

Greetings from Spain.
Now that's how you answer a question! That was great.
 

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