Abusing Our Heritage

Discussion in 'Smoothbore' started by Feltwad, Jan 12, 2020.

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  1. Jan 15, 2020 #21

    RiverRat

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    Save it for a federal buy back program....I have several in that condition.
     
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  2. Jan 15, 2020 #22

    Rudyard

    Rudyard

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    While such a gun would definatly be something of a challenge. I have used old rifle barrels so rusted externally that the false breech, tang nail, trigger plate,& trigger where all fuzzed together with rust yet the bores where quite good . So I stocked them all up and they have given me years of service. One my favourite 24 bore two grouve. Another was just a 3 pounds rust streak off old Stan Share of Ardentiny who used to do Notts Arms fairs. The bore had three deep grouves with a pitch of 1 in 30" meant for some three winged bullet about 490 cal . But while so pitted you couldnt pick the makers name it had its circa 1850s sight it cleaned up internally and perhaps grateful of my efforts to save it it won matches at 300 and 500 yards and I've more moulds for that rifle than any other rifle I've owned inc a hollow nosed three winged ' shell 'I made That really did a number on deer plus it fires ball quite well .On it I just modified an old shotgun stock & both have ten Rupee Indian local trade locks. So I might have about 5 pounds apiece in them but there precious old friends to me .One other perhaps notable salvage was a pair of double Jacobs infantry rifle barrels so rusted they fell apart but the bores where good . So I later relayed them and made a mould and shot them succesfully in a jury rig stock, though I have them now partly restocked properly . Incidently while the Jacobs where parted I improvised one barrel into a rude common matchlock just for one shoot in Adelaide S Australia where one young 'Heelerau' saw them and remembers the gun the first matchlock he saw I gather . My first' got up' shotgun was using an old single 16 bore barrel in a pine stock & a ill suited Govt carbine flint lock .The bore was awful so I took it apart but kept it 50 years when I figured a 44 cal liner old Kit Ravenshear gave me might serve as a sleeve so I made up a flint gun ,shot it as a gun but soon after lined it to a useful bush rifle .. And finally the very first Matchlock I made while at school was with a Persian ? 40"about 10 bore just a test affair but I kept the barrel & now its stocked up with a big snaphance lock in the rare Scottish style . . Moral of story if there is one don't disparage old parts , in fact I feel I'me giving new life to these otherwise discarded bits and often muse that maybe the long gone makers might approuve. I regret I don't have Brit smoothies skill at photography and rather battle with these computer things to post good pics. Rudyard
     
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  3. Jan 15, 2020 #23

    springfield art

    springfield art

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    Yeah, but parts for what? Only thing seems to be good is the wood stock. Otherwise it's a "bar hanger"!
     
  4. Jan 15, 2020 #24

    springfield art

    springfield art

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    Yep. I remember a big Army-Navy store in the '60's had Springfield rifles in a barrel for $50 each; I was young, had no money. Another local sporting goods store had Carcanos for $18, again in a barrel. (Early '60's prior to '68 GCA)
     
  5. Jan 15, 2020 #25

    ppg1949

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    How would you restore the muzzle, cut it off? I had an old musket converted to a shotgun in better shape than that one and I had it only as wall hanger. Like Ames said "drive two railroad spikes through it to the wall just to remove the temptation".
     
  6. Jan 16, 2020 #26

    Feltwad

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    With just a general clean of the rust and squaring of the muzzle the gun will never be a shooter but a wall hanger which will not need two railroad spicks to fasten it too the wall has suggested by some.It is now in a stage which should save it from being scrap with the main object to save all the original parts and too look original thus saving our heritage . Enclosed are images of before and after .
    Feltwad
    Before
    [​IMG]
    After
    [​IMG]
    Before
    [​IMG]
    After
    [​IMG]
    Finish Job
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2020
  7. Jan 16, 2020 #27

    Robby

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    I'd stabilize it from further deterioration and make it as presentable as I possibly could. If I lacked wall space, which I surely do, I would give it to someone that would appreciate it for what it is, with only one caveat, no more attics, basements, or barns, you get sick of it you find a good home, return it to me and I will find a good home.
     
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  8. Jan 16, 2020 #28

    Rudyard

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    Good on you Feltwad, I admire your skill & patience Far more merit than the rail road spike nonsence . Regards Rudyard
     
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  9. Jan 16, 2020 #29

    russellshaffer

    russellshaffer

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    That cleaned up very well indeed. How are the lock internals? And did the nipples remove or are they frozen?
     
  10. Jan 16, 2020 #30

    Feltwad

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    Both locks were ok only one needed a new stirrup from the mainspring to the tumbler. Making sure the bore was clear and not loaded I remove the nipples with heat cleaned them and replaced to keep it original
    Feltwad
     
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  11. Jan 16, 2020 #31

    Blogman

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    Ya did a good thing there Feltwad, kudos to you man.
     
  12. Jan 16, 2020 #32

    flntlokr

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    If any of those were in that shape, they would still be wallhangers The only reason to attempt a restoration of one of those is to be able to point at it and say you did it.
     
  13. Jan 16, 2020 #33

    ppg1949

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    Superior work!
     
  14. Jan 16, 2020 #34

    Pukka Bundook

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    Feltwad,

    Very good job, and a real labour of love!

    As we would say back home, "I thowt that'un was about buggered".
     
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  15. Jan 17, 2020 #35

    Rudyard

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    Wer abart buggererd didn't need the ' was' Got to maintain proper spellin eh.
    In Jest Rudyard
     
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  16. Jan 17, 2020 #36

    russellshaffer

    russellshaffer

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    Is there a reason not to shoot it? Concerns about barrels and breechplugs maybe? From the pictures, I would be sorely tempted.
     
  17. Jan 17, 2020 #37

    Blogman

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    Ditto but I'm just that way.
     
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  18. Jan 17, 2020 #38

    Pukka Bundook

    Pukka Bundook

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    Rudyard and maybe Feltwad will know this type;
    Have had them where there is no longer a hole all the way down the barrel. rusted shut for half the length.
    Had to drill out the rust before boring it smooth again. Likely such barrels should be retired, but being (at that time) young and foolish we used them anyway. Now, being Old(er) and foolish, tend to still do the same...
     
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  19. Jan 17, 2020 #39

    Rudyard

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    Pukka. Your only saying that because its true , but giving new life to old parts is in its way paying homage to the old makers .That( and getting a gun on the cheap) appeals to my ingrained Yorkshire thrift !, Regards Rudyard
     
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  20. Jan 17, 2020 #40

    Pukka Bundook

    Pukka Bundook

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    That's our trouble, Rudyard, ( And Feltwads). ... Yorkshire thrift is our problem!

    On another station, they are talking about starting out with a smoothbore, ...buying wads and what-not.
    I bet all us "Thrifties" started out with balls of rolled up newspaper or brown paper.
    Apart from setting the marsh afire, paper always worked well enough, and "back then" no-one could afford "proper" wads.
    We all saved our shekels for powder and lead.
     
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