Quantcast

A List Of Goods For Indian Presents. 18th Century.

Help Support Muzzle Loading Forum:

Le Loup

32 Cal.
MLF Supporter
Joined
Feb 15, 2010
Messages
431
Reaction score
207
Location
New England Australia

From a memorial from Benjamin Martyn, agent for Georgia, to the Board of Trade, Jan. 28, 1755. This is directly from a 1750 list of goods that was used to suggest what should be purchased with £1500 for Indian presents to be distributed to the groups bordering the colony of Georgia, reused by Martyn.
From the Colonial Records of the State of Georgia.
Enclosure A
A list of goods for Indian Presents.
20 pieces striped Duffils, the stripes bright
28 half pieces blew Strouds
14 half pieces red Do.
10 pieces blew plains corded and Wormed for Women
200 Yards of embroider’d Serge the patterns large
2500 lb F. Gunpowder
150 Wilson’s trading Guns
40 Fowling Pieces
12 Saddles with Cruppers and Bridles
8 Do. a better Sort with Housings
2 Gross Stone Rings
12 Doz. Horn Combs
6 Doz. Ivory Do.
4 Gross black and spotted Clasp knives
12 Doz. Razors
12 Doz. pair Scyssors
12 Doz. looking Glasses
12 Nests of red gilt trunks
19 Doz. check Shirts
18 Doz. white Garlics Do
15 pieces of Calicoe 18 yards in Each
50Cnt trading Bells
34 second hand scarlet, red, and blew coats
6 Do. a better sort, and 6 Waistcoats for head men
34 tinsel laced hats
6 tinsel laced hats a better Sort for Head Men
6 Gross Body Cadis in pieces 12 yards each
6 Gross figured and Star Gartering
30 lb Vermilion
14 Gross long Pipes
60 Gross Hunters Do
100 lb. Shag cut tobacco
40 lb. bright brass wire sorted
6 Gross Hawks Bells smallest size
12 Dozen Oval-eyed Hatchets
250 lb brass Kettles sorted
10 Nests tin Kettles 15 in Each
4 Doz. quart tin Pots
4 Doz. pint Do
4 Doz 1/2 Pint Do
4,000 Black flints for trading guns
1,000 Do for Fowling Pieces

Source: Coleman, K., Ready, M., (1976). The Colonial records of the state of Georgia. Vol.27, Original papers of Governor John Reynolds, 1754-1756. Athens: University of Georgia Press. pp. 30-31
https://woodsrunnersdiary.blogspot.com/2017/02/a-list-of-goods-for-indian-presents.html
Keith.
 

Ranger Boyd

40 Cal
Joined
Nov 23, 2018
Messages
106
Reaction score
79
Location
Newville, PA
Very interesting. I have occasionally seen coats appear on trade lists, but this is the first I have seen that specified "second hand."
 

Spence10

Cannon
Joined
Aug 8, 2010
Messages
7,646
Reaction score
997
Location
Kentucky
Keith, there is a fascinating document available called the Pittsburgh Waste Book, 1759-1760, a sort of scratch pad of notations re the expenses and activities of Fort Pitt immediately after it was built. I've enjoyed trying to decipher it quite a lot, have been able to extract a fair amount of info from it. It's a good way to spend some spare time. ;)

https://digital.library.pitt.edu/islandora/object/pitt:31735061278424

Spence
 

Le Loup

32 Cal.
MLF Supporter
Joined
Feb 15, 2010
Messages
431
Reaction score
207
Location
New England Australia
Keith, there is a fascinating document available called the Pittsburgh Waste Book, 1759-1760, a sort of scratch pad of notations re the expenses and activities of Fort Pitt immediately after it was built. I've enjoyed trying to decipher it quite a lot, have been able to extract a fair amount of info from it. It's a good way to spend some spare time. ;)

https://digital.library.pitt.edu/islandora/object/pitt:31735061278424

Spence
As the Aussies say over here Spence, you little ripper! Well done mate & thank you for the link. Very much appreciated.
Regards, Keith.
 

Spence10

Cannon
Joined
Aug 8, 2010
Messages
7,646
Reaction score
997
Location
Kentucky
Keith, when this ledger was first posted to the forum in 2016 there was a long thread discussing it, and there is a lot if information about and from it in the thread. Scattered through it are list of things of interest, items I was able to decipher, etc. If you have any interest, that thread might save you some time and give you a look at what was going on at Fort Pitt at that time.

https://www.muzzleloadingforum.com/threads/fort-pitt-trading-ledger-1759-to-1760.105516/

Spence
 

Le Loup

32 Cal.
MLF Supporter
Joined
Feb 15, 2010
Messages
431
Reaction score
207
Location
New England Australia
Keith, when this ledger was first posted to the forum in 2016 there was a long thread discussing it, and there is a lot if information about and from it in the thread. Scattered through it are list of things of interest, items I was able to decipher, etc. If you have any interest, that thread might save you some time and give you a look at what was going on at Fort Pitt at that time.

https://www.muzzleloadingforum.com/threads/fort-pitt-trading-ledger-1759-to-1760.105516/

Spence
Appreciated Spence, good man! I will definitely check it out, thank you.
Keith.
 

Brokennock

62 Cal.
Joined
May 15, 2011
Messages
2,885
Reaction score
1,517
Location
North Central Connecticut
What be, "pieces blew plains corded and Wormed for Women"?

Figured "blew" is blue. But what are "plains" and how are they "corded" and "wormed"?
 

Brokennock

62 Cal.
Joined
May 15, 2011
Messages
2,885
Reaction score
1,517
Location
North Central Connecticut
"Body caddis in pieces,"? Hmmmm.

Interesting that we picked up the tobacco habit from the natives, and here this lists asks to be supplied with some to be gifted the natives. Might this be for the polite formality of greeting with tobacco?
 

Toklo Etee

36 Cl.
Joined
Nov 1, 2018
Messages
59
Reaction score
63
What be, "pieces blew plains corded and Wormed for Women"?

Figured "blew" is blue. But what are "plains" and how are they "corded" and "wormed"?
Brokennock
The method used to resist the dye when dying Stroud cloth. The white "list" is the undyed inset stripe seen on early to mid 18th Stroud. When it is corded it creates a thin stripe, wormed could be the description for a thin stripe that undulates.
 

Nativearizonan

54 Cal.
MLF Supporter
Joined
Feb 18, 2015
Messages
1,703
Reaction score
65
I noticed the 4 gross black and spotted clasp knives. That is 576 folding knives, and I don't see any non folding knives, such as butcher knives, listed. That sure doesn't fit the Hollywood version of life back in the day.

They also had over 10,000 pipes, if my ciphering is correct, to smoke that 100 lbs of tobacco in.

14 gross long pipes (14 x 144 = 2016)
60 gross hunters Do (ditto, meaning also pipes), (60 x 144 = 8640)

That's a lot of pipes.
 

Ketchakah

40 Cal.
Joined
Nov 29, 2009
Messages
393
Reaction score
58
Location
Cortlands Ford, Indiana territory
"Body caddis in pieces,"? Hmmmm.

Interesting that we picked up the tobacco habit from the natives, and here this lists asks to be supplied with some to be gifted the natives. Might this be for the polite formality of greeting with tobacco?
Welllllll Actuallly...... Depends what you are specifically talking about. Original Native "tobacco" was not the same stuff that was re-imported in later times. The habitual "recreational" use of tobacco was imported along with it. At least as far as MY people are concerned anyway.

But ill leave it at that, as we are treading on some deep spiritual grounds at this point.
 

Toklo Etee

36 Cl.
Joined
Nov 1, 2018
Messages
59
Reaction score
63
Brokennock
The method used to resist the dye when dying Stroud cloth. The white "list" is the undyed inset stripe seen on early to mid 18th Stroud. When it is corded it creates a thin stripe, wormed could be the description for a thin stripe that undulates.
This is an example of the most common style of mid 18th Stroud cloth that I reproduce
 

Attachments

Brokennock

62 Cal.
Joined
May 15, 2011
Messages
2,885
Reaction score
1,517
Location
North Central Connecticut
Welllllll Actuallly...... Depends what you are specifically talking about. Original Native "tobacco" was not the same stuff that was re-imported in later times. The habitual "recreational" use of tobacco was imported along with it. At least as far as MY people are concerned anyway.

But ill leave it at that, as we are treading on some deep spiritual grounds at this point.
Thanks S.M. I would be interested to learn more of such deep spiritual ground regarding this matter. Not sure if it can be addressed in another thread elsewhere here. If not, you know how to reach me.
 

Nativearizonan

54 Cal.
MLF Supporter
Joined
Feb 18, 2015
Messages
1,703
Reaction score
65
Not to tread on the spiritual realm, but as far as the biology goes, the tobacco that was grown and smoked by East Coast Indians was Nicotiana Rustica, sometimes called Aztec tobacco or mapacho. It was also grown in New Mexico when the first Anglos got there.

The species that was brought to VA from the Caribbean to be farmed and shipped to Europe for sale, as well as for sale to local inhabitants, was N. tabacum, and it is what's still grown today for 99% of the tobacco products available for sale.

Other forms of truly wild tobacco were available mainly in the SW, although sometimes further north, but not in the East. These included N. attenuata (coyote tobacco), N. obtusifolia (desert tobacco, punche, or tabaquillo), and a few others.
 

tenngun

Cannon
MLF Supporter
Joined
Jan 27, 2008
Messages
13,333
Reaction score
3,827
Location
Republic mo
"Body caddis in pieces,"? Hmmmm.

Interesting that we picked up the tobacco habit from the natives, and here this lists asks to be supplied with some to be gifted the natives. Might this be for the polite formality of greeting with tobacco?
The tabacco grown in North America was more harsh and bitter. The tabacco that grew inthe Caribbean and west coast of Mexico and central America is the sweeter milder tobacco that we smoke today. The Farms that grew up in American raised tabacco bred from southern leaf. Different growing conditions and soils and local cross breeding lead to world wide varieties. The Indians liked our sweeter leaf then native smoke. All the kinninkanic bleands was an attempt to extend the tobacco but also cover the more hash taste.
Exchanging tobacco was a sign of good will. So two groups meeting would exchange pouches to share a smoke while talking.
 

Latest posts

Top