'61 Springfield?

Discussion in 'Firearm Identification' started by Seagrave, Jan 16, 2019.

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  1. Jan 16, 2019 #1

    Seagrave

    Seagrave

    Seagrave

    32 Cal

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    Hello,
    A friend of mine acquired what may be an 1861 Springfield from his in-laws. It's in pretty bad shape; forearm has been cut down; and what looks like a repair to the wrist. The barrel has some faint signs of rifling in it, and looks like a .577 or .58 size bore, but is badly rusted. There are a series of numbers stamped on the tang and toe of the stock; which appear to be "28" and "96" and "26." Any idea if the numbers have significance for identifying the rifle?
    Thank you for any assistance you can provide.
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  2. Jan 16, 2019 #2

    curator

    curator

    curator

    45 Cal.

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    Those numbers may have been "rack" numbers or possibly unit or National Guard inventory numbers. They don't have any significance in identifying your gun. It is a typical 1861 musket made into a "barn gun." Many many muskets were treated so after the Civil War. Most were also bored out to make them into shotguns. The presence of the rear sight may mean that this gun remained as a rifle. Yours is just about "relic" condition; too badly corroded to restore. Nonetheless it is an authentic historical artifact and as such should be preserved as it is.
     
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  3. Jan 19, 2019 #3

    Seagrave

    Seagrave

    Seagrave

    32 Cal

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    Unfortunately my friend (person holding the rifle in the photo) didn't have much additional information, other than it was passed to him from a member of his wife's family. Thank you for the reply, and information regarding possible "rack numbers."
     
  4. Feb 16, 2019 #4

    tenngun

    tenngun

    tenngun

    Cannon

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    There is a photo of an elderly gent from Gettysburg who took up his war of 1812 musket and went off to defend his town on July 1st. He is seen sitting on his porch after the battle convalescing. His musket is by his side. It’s been cut down and turned into a half stock.
    We decry mutilating a gun, but that’s the living history of this piece. It deserves respect along side it’s better kept veterans.
     

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