33rd Regiment of Foot - Lord Cornwallis' Own

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I'm not certain if there is any interest in this unit of the army of George III, so if it's in the wrong place, or even the totally wrong forum, please let me know.

We went back to my wife's home town of Chester last weekend, and went to the first open day of Chester Castle to the public for a long time. A small 'recruiting detachment' of the local regiment of those days, the 33rd, was strutting their stuff - a recruiting sergeant, and drummer boy, a corporal and four private soldiers, and the regimental scribe, ready to take details and to sign on recruits.

Here they are drawn up in front of the main portico of the building -

View attachment 139898

In the Sergeant's 'harangue' he stressed that only men of good character should even think of joining, and offered not a King's shilling, but THREE GUINEAS to the joinee. They are wearing Home Dress, based on the 1768/70 regulations - the uniform prior to the posting of the regiment to the colonies where they came under the authority of the British commander, Lord Cornwallis.

Here is the Sergeant with his dress halberd -

View attachment 139902

As I noted, it might not be of much interest to you over in the USA.

Please comment, or not, as the case may be.


Very nice! I was with the 43rd of Foot here in Pennsylvania, where we have a nearby town named Chester, and a County named Chester, all near Philadelphia. Your uniforms are very familiar, I enacted with the 43rd for 10 years, also a regiment that turned our as American (Rebel!) as the occasion required. Best Regards.
 
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The regiment was not a skirmishing organisation, but a Line Regiment, as I'm sure you are well aware. I made the post with the aim of showing what a pre-Revolutionary War English county regiment looked like, not to engage in the unsuitability of their clothing for operations in North America. We ALL know how THAT ended.

It happens that their uniform for the then-upcoming conflict differed in many details from that of the Home Dress you see here. No doubt an American re-enactor of King George's Army could acquaint you with it.
Looks very familiar to my old reg't, the 43rd. of foot.
 

Pukka Sahib

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Back in the distant past, I did British Line Regiment re-enacting, and got to do it in the US and the UK. About 90% of the time, I was uncomfortable when in all the gear in the US. Mostly WAY too hot, or not warm enough in a cold snap. When in the UK, the reverse was true, and all the layers and wool were generally comfortable. As to visibility, it was more about intimidation and uniformity than anything else.
 
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Here is a photo of our reg't when the state dept. sent us to France for the Versatile treaty celebration back in 1983, taken from a billboard. We had a wreath laying ceremony at the Arch de Triumph, after marching on the cobblestones I had to buy new shoes from my feet swelling up! Those were some days.....memories!
 

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TFoley

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It is also good to see the men in uniform are younger and interested in history. So often ( on this forum) it is lamented as to the old age of our participants.


FYI, the drummer boy is the son of the private soldier standing next to the corporal -
1652908920790.png
 
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I'm not certain if there is any interest in this unit of the army of George III, so if it's in the wrong place, or even the totally wrong forum, please let me know.

We went back to my wife's home town of Chester last weekend, and went to the first open day of Chester Castle to the public for a long time. A small 'recruiting detachment' of the local regiment of those days, the 33rd, was strutting their stuff - a recruiting sergeant, and drummer boy, a corporal and four private soldiers, and the regimental scribe, ready to take details and to sign on recruits.

Here they are drawn up in front of the main portico of the building -

View attachment 139898

In the Sergeant's 'harangue' he stressed that only men of good character should even think of joining, and offered not a King's shilling, but THREE GUINEAS to the joinee. They are wearing Home Dress, based on the 1768/70 regulations - the uniform prior to the posting of the regiment to the colonies where they came under the authority of the British commander, Lord Cornwallis.

Here is the Sergeant with his dress halberd -

View attachment 139902

As I noted, it might not be of much interest to you over in the USA.

Please comment, or not, as the case may be.


Thanks for the photos, always interesting to see.
 
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I'm not certain if there is any interest in this unit of the army of George III, so if it's in the wrong place, or even the totally wrong forum, please let me know.

We went back to my wife's home town of Chester last weekend, and went to the first open day of Chester Castle to the public for a long time. A small 'recruiting detachment' of the local regiment of those days, the 33rd, was strutting their stuff - a recruiting sergeant, and drummer boy, a corporal and four private soldiers, and the regimental scribe, ready to take details and to sign on recruits.

Here they are drawn up in front of the main portico of the building -

View attachment 139898

In the Sergeant's 'harangue' he stressed that only men of good character should even think of joining, and offered not a King's shilling, but THREE GUINEAS to the joinee. They are wearing Home Dress, based on the 1768/70 regulations - the uniform prior to the posting of the regiment to the colonies where they came under the authority of the British commander, Lord Cornwallis.

Here is the Sergeant with his dress halberd -

View attachment 139902

As I noted, it might not be of much interest to you over in the USA.

Please comment, or not, as the case may be.


Thanks for sharing! I love this stuff!
 
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beyu

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I'm not certain if there is any interest in this unit of the army of George III, so if it's in the wrong place, or even the totally wrong forum, please let me know.

We went back to my wife's home town of Chester last weekend, and went to the first open day of Chester Castle to the public for a long time. A small 'recruiting detachment' of the local regiment of those days, the 33rd, was strutting their stuff - a recruiting sergeant, and drummer boy, a corporal and four private soldiers, and the regimental scribe, ready to take details and to sign on recruits.

Here they are drawn up in front of the main portico of the building -


NOT INTERESTED? Are you kidding?

Many of us on this site shoot flintlocks for Pete's sake! We are all confirmed History Nuts!
 

stephenprops1

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I'm not certain if there is any interest in this unit of the army of George III, so if it's in the wrong place, or even the totally wrong forum, please let me know.

We went back to my wife's home town of Chester last weekend, and went to the first open day of Chester Castle to the public for a long time. A small 'recruiting detachment' of the local regiment of those days, the 33rd, was strutting their stuff - a recruiting sergeant, and drummer boy, a corporal and four private soldiers, and the regimental scribe, ready to take details and to sign on recruits.

Here they are drawn up in front of the main portico of the building -

View attachment 139898

In the Sergeant's 'harangue' he stressed that only men of good character should even think of joining, and offered not a King's shilling, but THREE GUINEAS to the joinee. They are wearing Home Dress, based on the 1768/70 regulations - the uniform prior to the posting of the regiment to the colonies where they came under the authority of the British commander, Lord Cornwallis.

Here is the Sergeant with his dress halberd -

View attachment 139902

As I noted, it might not be of much interest to you over in the USA.

Please comment, or not, as the case may be.


My 6th Great-Grandfather was in the Virginia Militia. They marched with Light Horse Harry Lee and fought at the Battle of Guilford Courthouse. Unfortunately, they were defeated in that battle, but inflicted enough damage that the British moved south instead of marching on to Yorktown and linking up with Cornwallis. Lee, his men, and the Virginia Militia went on to Yorktown. There they linked up with Lafayette. As you know the Yorktown surrender was essentially the end of the American Revolution. --- I mean no disrespect. I have British heritage in my family tree (English, Irish and Welsh).
 

TFoley

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My 6th Great-Grandfather was in the Virginia Militia. They marched with Light Horse Harry Lee and fought at the Battle of Guilford Courthouse. Unfortunately, they were defeated in that battle, but inflicted enough damage that the British moved south instead of marching on to Yorktown and linking up with Cornwallis. Lee, his men, and the Virginia Militia went on to Yorktown. There they linked up with Lafayette. As you know the Yorktown surrender was essentially the end of the American Revolution. --- I mean no disrespect. I have British heritage in my family tree (English, Irish and Welsh).

No offenc/se taken. I'm just one-eighth English from my maternal grandmother. What you guys got up to with the British back in the 1770's is of no real concern of mine, and never was more than historically interesting to me. My ancestors had their own problems. On my dad's side, trying to stay alive in rural Ireland, and the same deal in rural England.
 
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TFoley

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In case that some of you have never heard of Chester, the city is a World Heritage Site in its own right, and has a consistently documented history for almost two thousand years. This is just one of the many hundreds of videos on Youtube about it - take a look, I might see you there some day!

 
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I’m 75% Welsh and the rest blended between the Scott’s and Irish. My ancestors landed here in the colonies in 1678 and then headed straight for the hills of the up country of the Up state of North Carolina. The dislike of British has a long history in my family. I find the pomp and circumstance of the Brits to be their downfall as with the Romans thinking they were superior to anyone else. And history repeats itself as it always does and now we the USA are on the decline.
Celebrate your past with respect to those that served. It’s the only thing we can do to spite modern times
 

TFoley

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I’m, yes the American army did use European battle tactics. Some adaptations were added of course. But the army didn’t run around hiding behind trees shooting at the nicely lined/up British fellas.

You mean the Continental Army - they were not at that time called Americans. The Continental Army DID end up using similar formations and tactics, tactics that remained unchanged ninety years later in the Civil War. Only the Confederate General McClellan, an Irishman and former British soldier, brought any new way of battlefield tactics to combat, and sad for some, he did not last the course. His British tactics and use of the English cartridge could well have influenced the way that the war progressed. Not a win for the CSA, given the North's mighty industrial advantage, but, as I noted, a bloodier nose, more frequently administered, than was the end result.

Read Brett Gibbons' excellent book - 'The English Cartridge' - to see what I mean.
 

SmokepoleSam

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Tac, I don't mean to disagree with you but could you please point me to the information on this general? I do know about the union General George B. McClellan who commanded the US army for a while and was removed before the battle of Gettysburg.
Thank you for your help. Maybe I'm not looking in the right places. I do have a book on civil war generals but I can't get at it right now.
 

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