33rd Regiment of Foot - Lord Cornwallis' Own

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TFoley

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I'm not certain if there is any interest in this unit of the army of George III, so if it's in the wrong place, or even the totally wrong forum, please let me know.

We went back to my wife's home town of Chester last weekend, and went to the first open day of Chester Castle to the public for a long time. A small 'recruiting detachment' of the local regiment of those days, the 33rd, was strutting their stuff - a recruiting sergeant, and drummer boy, a corporal and four private soldiers, and the regimental scribe, ready to take details and to sign on recruits.

Here they are drawn up in front of the main portico of the building -

1652787277371.png


In the Sergeant's 'harangue' he stressed that only men of good character should even think of joining, and offered not a King's shilling, but THREE GUINEAS to the joinee. They are wearing Home Dress, based on the 1768/70 regulations - the uniform prior to the posting of the regiment to the colonies where they came under the authority of the British commander, Lord Cornwallis.

Here is the Sergeant with his dress halberd -

1652787630672.png


As I noted, it might not be of much interest to you over in the USA.

Please comment, or not, as the case may be.

 
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TFoley

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Snappy dressers for sure, just not too practical for backwoods concealment. Americans didn't play fair by European standards of warfare :thumb:

The regiment was not a skirmishing organisation, but a Line Regiment, as I'm sure you are well aware. I made the post with the aim of showing what a pre-Revolutionary War English county regiment looked like, not to engage in the unsuitability of their clothing for operations in North America. We ALL know how THAT ended.

It happens that their uniform for the then-upcoming conflict differed in many details from that of the Home Dress you see here. No doubt an American re-enactor of King George's Army could acquaint you with it.
 
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The regiment was not a skirmishing organisation, but a Line Regiment, as I'm sure you are well aware. I made the post with the aim of showing what a pre-Revolutionary War English county regiment looked like, not to engage in the unsuitability of their clothing for operations in North America. We ALL know how THAT ended.

It happens that their uniform for the then-upcoming conflict differed in many details from that of the Home Dress you see here. No doubt an American re-enactor of King George's Army could acquaint you with it.
Sorry, didn't mean to demean, just an observation.
 

Dutch7

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I can appreciate any group that strives to portray their intended character(s) as accurately as possible. Well done.

Just curios why in the first photo the guy on the left shoulders to the opposite side as the others, new guy?
 
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I find these photos fascinating!
The uniforms and clothing from back then are great!
I especially love the setting - the old stone walls with repairs, the adjacent buildings, the whole locale, I would love to visit there.
So, yes, please post more photos and videos of things over yonder (I won't say across the pond!) for us Yanks that might not ever get over there.
 

TFoley

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Well, Gentlemen, the location is Chester Castle, parts of which date back to the 11th C, although some of the structure was built with stone robbed from the Roman Walls that still surround the city for about 2 miles. Even the name of Chester is derived from the Latin for a Roman military fortress - Castra - as is every other place in the UK with -cester, -caster, -chester at the end of the prefix.

The whole place is a huge collection of magnificent older buildings dating from the early medieval church of St John to the magnificent read sandstone cathedral. Chester is famous for its unique 'rows' of black and white shops/stores that line the streets. The main city, of course, is built on top of the original Roman military camp outline - it was known as Castra Deva [the local river goddess] Romanum. You'd really benefit from taking a look at the hundred of videos on Youtube - many taken by the many thousands of American tourists that visit every year.

1652868893734.png
 
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Snappy dressers for sure, just not too practical for backwoods concealment. Americans didn't play fair by European standards of warfare :thumb:
I’m, yes the American army did use European battle tactics. Some adaptations were added of course. But the army didn’t run around hiding behind trees shooting at the nicely lined/up British fellas.
 

Loyalist Dave

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Snappy dressers for sure, just not too practical for backwoods concealment. Americans didn't play fair by European standards of warfare :thumb:

Yes the Crafty Continentals won by sneaking around the woods, not by going toe-to-toe with British Regulars, and the Continentals won most if not all of the battles.... those crossed white belts on blue coats blended sooo well too......

..., Wait.......

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LD
 
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I remember a comedy show with Bill Cosby about this. I think there was a coin- toss preceding the war. Winners got to hide and shoot from behind trees and logs while the losers had to stand in straight lines with red coats and white X’s over their hearts. It was hilarious to hear.
Unfortunately most people think that’s about how it really went, tactically.
 
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I'm not certain if there is any interest in this unit of the army of George III, so if it's in the wrong place, or even the totally wrong forum, please let me know.

We went back to my wife's home town of Chester last weekend, and went to the first open day of Chester Castle to the public for a long time. A small 'recruiting detachment' of the local regiment of those days, the 33rd, was strutting their stuff - a recruiting sergeant, and drummer boy, a corporal and four private soldiers, and the regimental scribe, ready to take details and to sign on recruits.

Here they are drawn up in front of the main portico of the building -

View attachment 139898

In the Sergeant's 'harangue' he stressed that only men of good character should even think of joining, and offered not a King's shilling, but THREE GUINEAS to the joinee. They are wearing Home Dress, based on the 1768/70 regulations - the uniform prior to the posting of the regiment to the colonies where they came under the authority of the British commander, Lord Cornwallis.

Here is the Sergeant with his dress halberd -

View attachment 139902

As I noted, it might not be of much interest to you over in the USA.

Please comment, or not, as the case may be.


Enjoyed your pictures. Always love history...we used to be British subjects you know.
 

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