.32 cal Kibler SMR?

Discussion in 'Flintlock Rifles' started by Hubertus, Jan 3, 2020.

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  1. Jan 3, 2020 #1

    Hubertus

    Hubertus

    Hubertus

    40 Cal. MLF Supporter

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    I'm interested in some feedback on the .32 Kibler SMR...I'm looking to build one in either .32 or .45 but am waffling back and forth. Do you have trouble keeping that 46" barrel loadable or does it cake up real bad in the small caliber? (I follow Dutch's (Dr5x) teaching's so I wipe between shots and am wondering if the extra long barrel makes it more challenging). Would the round-bottom rifling in the Rice barrel help with the caking in this small bore?

    Again, I'm trying to decide if I want to go with the .32 or if it'll be too much of a pain.
    If I got it in .45 then I could use it for deer hunting too...but I have other rifles for that..so it isn't a "must". I just think a SMR in .32 would be a sweet little shooter and great in the squirrel woods. Btw, how well does the .32 or the .45 Kibler SMR balance? I suppose the .32 will be more muzzle heavy being the same barrel profile.
    Thanks for your input!
     
  2. Jan 4, 2020 #2

    Scota@4570

    Scota@4570

    Scota@4570

    36 Cl.

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    I assembled one in 45. It handled like a dream, sort of like a long barreled Winchester M42 410 shotgun. Long and lean but still had the momentum of the long barrel, it was very unique. It had super fancy wood, somebody offered me a lot of money. I reluctantly sold it. I now regret selling it.

    I now have an SMR in 36 cal. It is noticeably less "lively" . Loading the smaller balls is more difficult and frustrating. I have the beginnings of arthritis. It messes with my dexterity.

    I may get another 45 cal in the future and sell the 36.
     
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  3. Jan 4, 2020 #3

    tenngun

    tenngun

    tenngun

    Cannon

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    Had a .36 not a .32. Kept a jag on ramrod. Swabbed between shots. In fact that’s when I started doing that, before I had a .36 I would just load till it got tight.
    Them ittybitty balls are hard to handle if the weather gets a bit chilly. And ittybitty ramrod also is a pia.
    A wipe a dry and then load will make it a lot easier to play with.
     
  4. Jan 4, 2020 #4

    The Crisco Kid

    The Crisco Kid

    The Crisco Kid

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    I like a 32. It's a lot of fun and cheap to shoot. The fouling doesn't seem to be much of an issue. The thing I would consider is the weight and the balance. The 32 will be quite a bit heavier than a 45 of the same barrel dimensions.
     
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  5. Jan 4, 2020 #5

    Spikebuck

    Spikebuck

    Spikebuck

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    From Kibler's website...32 is 3/4 of a pound heavier than the 45

    Complete Rifle Weights |
    Approximately 7 lb 6 oz in 32 caliber, 7 lb 3 oz in 36 caliber, slightly under 7 lbs in 40 caliber and 6 lb 10 oz in 45 caliber

    As far as handling the small roundballs when cold...I always used a loading block when I had a .32 and a .36 (not Kibler). Put the patch and balls in the loading block at home where it's warm...easy to use in the field.

    Both of those rifles needed swabbing frequently to be able to load...the .32 more than the .36.

    I'd like to have another .36 some day and if I do, I am going to get Swiss 3F as that's probably about as clean burning as one can get.
     
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  6. Jan 4, 2020 #6

    Eric Krewson

    Eric Krewson

    Eric Krewson

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    I built a .32 SMR, I found a swab between shots helps keep the crud level down. When cleaning time comes be sure to use a breechplug scraper because there will be a bunch of fouling on the plug.

    The sad thing about my rifle is it has the standard dovetail spacing for sights and my eyes have gone downhill over the years to the point where I need the back sight over the rear ramrod entry pipe. I can see the sights good enough to shoot if the sun is going down behind my back but can't see them at all in the woods. I found this out on my first evening trip out to whack some squirrels, I tried to sight on a tree limb and it was the same as if I had no sights on my rifle, I couldn't see anything. I went back to the house, shot rifle empty, cleaned it well and put back in the gun safe.

    Nice rifle;

    kibler best side.JPG

    I thought about selling the rifle but it is the prettiest one in my stable, I am going to check and see if there are any tang mounted peeps at the Alabama Kentucky rifle show. Cataract surgery is not far off for me and that should solve my problem.
     
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  7. Jan 4, 2020 #7

    Grimord

    Grimord

    Grimord

    Fyrstyk MLF Supporter

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    Eric, I can feel your pain. I too was in the same boat. Had a custom .32 flinter made for me, but could not see the sites worth a darn. I purchased a Skinner "Low Pro" peep site. I had to drill and tap a 6/48 hole in the tang and it has made a world of difference. The Low Pro is adjustable for elevation only. Windage adj are via the front site. I think you will like it as it is very unobtrusive.
     
  8. Jan 4, 2020 #8

    Smokey Plainsman

    Smokey Plainsman

    Smokey Plainsman

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    One benefit of s .40 is it can use a 3/8” ramrod (.375”). Have you ever tried a .40? They’re nice.
     
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  9. Jan 6, 2020 #9

    The Crisco Kid

    The Crisco Kid

    The Crisco Kid

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    It may not seem like it at the time but cataracts may be the best thing that's happened to you for awhile. Getting the surgery, that is. Get the best you can find and if it costs more for specific lenses spend the money. You won't regret it.
     
  10. Jan 6, 2020 #10

    Kyblackpower

    Kyblackpower

    Kyblackpower

    32 Cal

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    I have a 32 cal made by tip Curtis. It’s shoots great and i just swapped it about every 5 shots . I use 12 grains of 3 f. I also have a Kibler kit in 32 smr. I may put it for sale . To fund the other projects.
     
  11. Jan 6, 2020 #11

    hanshi

    hanshi

    hanshi

    Cannon

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    Being a .45 fan the Kibler SMR I want is the .45. I own a .32 and a .36 and have fired them extensively on the range and in the squirrel woods. I have never had to swab either one anytime during a shooting session. My experience is that they do not foul any quicker or worse than much larger calibers. When I take either to the range I fully expect to spend all my time loading and shooting and only wipe the bore when finished. I normally use thick patches and lubes I'm confident in.
     
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  12. Jan 7, 2020 #12

    simonbeans

    simonbeans

    simonbeans

    36 Cal.

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    I built a Kibler SMR in .36. It shoots a .350 ball with .015 pillow ticking patch over 35 gr FFFg. It shoots great and loads easy. I use Hoppe's Black Plowder lube (used to be 9+). No issue with loading.

    [​IMG]
     
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  13. Jan 7, 2020 #13

    Hubertus

    Hubertus

    Hubertus

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    Thanks for all the great posts...So I went with the .45 in the end, ash wood... I’ll work up a reduced load for squirrels as others have posted in other threads. Should be a nice light and versatile rifle...now the wait begins...
     
  14. Jan 7, 2020 #14

    Hubertus

    Hubertus

    Hubertus

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    Is that a cherry stock?
     
  15. Jan 7, 2020 #15

    simonbeans

    simonbeans

    simonbeans

    36 Cal.

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    No, maple with Aqua fortis stain. I like a bit of reddish undertone. Just completed a Kibler Colonial rifle. It is at my buddy’s work shop being carved. He is an excellent builder and far beyond me with carving talent.
     
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