1st Serious Bead Attempt

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This will be my first attempt with Seed Beads, I have done edge beading and simple string beads but now I want to step it up.
Looking for critiques, suggestions, corrections before it begins.

Project: will be covering a 3.5×11 inch piece of smoked brain tan that will then be laced onto/into a buckskin rifle sleeve (wrapped around about mid barrel region).

Materials:
Smoke brain tan buckskin
Seed beads #11
Ash colored beading thread (nylon but has 'look' of sinew or old thread)

Planned Meathod:
Lazy Stich (row stitch, I think sometimes called block stich?)

My pattern I created myself after reading a lot of theories about mountan men and bead work in regards to Native Indians.
Points I noted:
*Becareful of colors/combinations due to their meaning to Natives and between tribes.
*Don't copy designs from any particular tribe unless thourally researched
*Using any design from one tribe may get you in serious trouble with another tribe.

Now, this is Not to be a "character", I am not trying to depict any particular person from a particular year or region. Just something that will, hopefully, not offend any particular tribe or belief (other then being a pale-face not traveling with a native woman).

My design as I have it planned so far:
* Light Blue background: color of friendship
* White Dove: I have not found it in any existing design but I did base it off Plains Indian 'Thunderbird' images.
* Weeping/Sweeping Heart: Not a Native Indian design but seen among various white man art and I have seen it back as far as the 1400s in Scottish work. It is in Red which I have read can be "War" but also read it can symbolize "Life" (color of blood).
* the top center geometric design may be leaning toward Plains Indians but is not copied but rather my 'doodle work' as is the boarder.
* I know the Black Boarder may be a bit 'bold' as black has some powerful meaning but I thought it sets the rest off; hopefully not crossing any lines with any particular tribe(s) east-to-west....?

So, I am still waiting for a few beads, and a magnifier so I can See what the heck I am doing.
Any critiques, criticisms, suggestions are welcome before I begin...?
(If all goes well, i may also do Bear Paws on either side of the muzzle afterwards)
 

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I’ve done my share of bead work, as I was really into it.
I think some of those things you said about it are not applicable to MM period.
Just offering an opinion here.
Most colors today were seen in the MM period. However before 1840 the big collars were white and a medium blue. Two colors Indians couldn’t produce.
All the earliest westren bead work taken from tribes tended to be splashes of color. The complex geometric designs tend to be from later period. Mostly reservation period.
Beads down to 13s we’re known. However again most early beadwork was in 5s and 8s. Along with the end of the MM period about 1840 machine made cheap sewing needles became common. And I think that effected bead trade.
Almost all early bead work forms a straight line or a box of color around quill work
Indians took clothing from dead or not so dead enemies. Often enemy tribesman would meet randomly. Instead of fighting they would trade clothing and go in different directions.
Women were often captured and married in to a tribe. They tended to keep their style. During MM period I doubt if tribes were very particular about a design shape or color being applicable to a tribe.
The Great Lake tribes did get deep in to bead work. And by the 1780s had a market of selling bead work to whites around the Great Lakes and even into Eastern Canada. The Canadians, English or French seem to have had little interest in native geometric designs. But scarfed up floral designs.
Floral became very popular and Great Lakes and Canadian tribes were soon producing floral bead work for own use.
Métis also seem to have preferred floral.
By the time of the Buffalo hunters floral bead work was common on whites frontier clothing.
While beads were going west sailors were embroidering their clothing. Almost all in floral.
I would hazard any beadwork on a MM outfit was done by him and in floral. Unless he took something from an Indian. And in that case I this time I would expect it to be a block of one color. Most likely blue.
 
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I’ve done my share of bead work, as I was really into it.
I think some of those things you said about it are not applicable to MM period.
Just offering an opinion here.
Most colors today were seen in the MM period. However before 1840 the big collars were white and a medium blue. Two colors Indians couldn’t produce.
All the earliest westren bead work taken from tribes tended to be splashes of color. The complex geometric designs tend to be from later period. Mostly reservation period.
Beads down to 13s we’re known. However again most early beadwork was in 5s and 8s. Along with the end of the MM period about 1840 machine made cheap sewing needles became common. And I think that effected bead trade.
Almost all early bead work forms a straight line or a box of color around quill work
Indians took clothing from dead or not so dead enemies. Often enemy tribesman would meet randomly. Instead of fighting they would trade clothing and go in different directions.
Women were often captured and married in to a tribe. They tended to keep their style. During MM period I doubt if tribes were very particular about a design shape or color being applicable to a tribe.
The Great Lake tribes did get deep in to bead work. And by the 1780s had a market of selling bead work to whites around the Great Lakes and even into Eastern Canada. The Canadians, English or French seem to have had little interest in native geometric designs. But scarfed up floral designs.
Floral became very popular and Great Lakes and Canadian tribes were soon producing floral bead work for own use.
Métis also seem to have preferred floral.
By the time of the Buffalo hunters floral bead work was common on whites frontier clothing.
While beads were going west sailors were embroidering their clothing. Almost all in floral.
I would hazard any beadwork on a MM outfit was done by him and in floral. Unless he took something from an Indian. And in that case I this time I would expect it to be a block of one color. Most likely blue.
Good stuff. I did read a few writings and a couple videos where a 'now living' Native woman dispelled the idea that 'only women did bead work's as many say, all said men too did bead work "but most" was done by women.
As for floral; I was trying to do a Thistle on my pattern maker but couldn't get anything I liked.
My reason for the Dove: my patch box is a brass dove.
Reason for the Heart: I couldn't get a thistle worked out and I know I have the sweeping (or weeping) heart traced back to at least 1400s in Scotland, my mother's side of family, and we've seen it a lot on bags and such...was also considering a German Hunting Star but read that "Yellow has special meaning, and not used a lot".

The reason for #11 beads...well, that is because Wandering Bull and another Native tutorial I watched said they were using #10...my pattern generator said #11 so I thought 'one size larger, no big deal' - after I ordered I found that #11 is Not larger but Smaller...oh well, I have #11 so...

Now, on the Pony Beads, several old 'examples' shown by Wandering Bull and others were very small seed beads...and several examples in the Carson City Museum (Washoe tribe and another) are very small, around #10, 9, maybe 8, with some perhaps around #13. Don't have dates on them but I am guessing back into at least late 1800s (forget off hand when Carson City and Genoa were founded).

Good info you have and Thanks for the input.
 
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Nice - well beyond my patience and skill levels !
Its Therapeutic and Relaxing.
At least that is what I told my wife when I was knitting Watch Caps and a Gunister Purse (the Gunister was like knitting with thread). I would come home from long stressful day at work (angry nasty customers and a horrible boss, body aches all over), take shower and start knitting till 10, 11 o'clock at night.....it calmed me down. Plus, once the pattern begins to emerge, you start getting a sense of: Ya, I Can Do This!
 
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This will be my first attempt with Seed Beads, I have done edge beading and simple string beads but now I want to step it up.
Looking for critiques, suggestions, corrections before it begins.

Project: will be covering a 3.5×11 inch piece of smoked brain tan that will then be laced onto/into a buckskin rifle sleeve (wrapped around about mid barrel region).

Materials:
Smoke brain tan buckskin
Seed beads #11
Ash colored beading thread (nylon but has 'look' of sinew or old thread)

Planned Meathod:
Lazy Stich (row stitch, I think sometimes called block stich?)

My pattern I created myself after reading a lot of theories about mountan men and bead work in regards to Native Indians.
Points I noted:
*Becareful of colors/combinations due to their meaning to Natives and between tribes.
*Don't copy designs from any particular tribe unless thourally researched
*Using any design from one tribe may get you in serious trouble with another tribe.

Now, this is Not to be a "character", I am not trying to depict any particular person from a particular year or region. Just something that will, hopefully, not offend any particular tribe or belief (other then being a pale-face not traveling with a native woman).

My design as I have it planned so far:
* Light Blue background: color of friendship
* White Dove: I have not found it in any existing design but I did base it off Plains Indian 'Thunderbird' images.
* Weeping/Sweeping Heart: Not a Native Indian design but seen among various white man art and I have seen it back as far as the 1400s in Scottish work. It is in Red which I have read can be "War" but also read it can symbolize "Life" (color of blood).
* the top center geometric design may be leaning toward Plains Indians but is not copied but rather my 'doodle work' as is the boarder.
* I know the Black Boarder may be a bit 'bold' as black has some powerful meaning but I thought it sets the rest off; hopefully not crossing any lines with any particular tribe(s) east-to-west....?

So, I am still waiting for a few beads, and a magnifier so I can See what the heck I am doing.
Any critiques, criticisms, suggestions are welcome before I begin...?
(If all goes well, i may also do Bear Paws on either side of the muzzle afterwards)
Tight! I love it
 

Red Owl

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I don't know that much about but I thought the "lazy" stitch was more common on the western plains, around the Great Lakes the beads were individually sewn. Geometric patterns were more for women, only men got to wear floral designs, various animals meant different things. I think a turtle meant good luck. The tribes had their own colors, I think a light green background was Sioux, White Cheyenne or Arapahoe- once again- just working from memory. As stated, once the reservation system was established and all the tribes got mixed up- the designs all changed.
There is a magazine called Whispering Wind. if this subject is of interest- try to buy an issue- you might want to subscribe.
 
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I don't know that much about but I thought the "lazy" stitch was more common on the western plains, around the Great Lakes the beads were individually sewn. Geometric patterns were more for women, only men got to wear floral designs, various animals meant different things. I think a turtle meant good luck. The tribes had their own colors, I think a light green background was Sioux, White Cheyenne or Arapahoe- once again- just working from memory. As stated, once the reservation system was established and all the tribes got mixed up- the designs all changed.
There is a magazine called Whispering Wind. if this subject is of interest- try to buy an issue- you might want to subscribe.
Thanks, I will look for that magazine.
I found several publications describing the color preferences of the various tribes, and yes all I found said the lazy stitch was most popular (perhaps created by) the Plains Indians.
But for this project I am trying to Avoid copying any particular tribe...and I am in the Paiute, Washoe, Shoshone area.
 
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Thanks, I will look for that magazine.
I found several publications describing the color preferences of the various tribes, and yes all I found said the lazy stitch was most popular (perhaps created by) the Plains Indians.
But for this project I am trying to Avoid copying any particular tribe...and I am in the Paiute, Washoe, Shoshone area.
The tribe in YOUR beadwork is ISRAEL! VERY NICE! AND NO YOU
BETTER NOT CENSOR GOD!
 
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The tribe in YOUR beadwork is ISRAEL! VERY NICE! AND NO YOU
BETTER NOT CENSOR GOD!
Not sure what you mean by that?
The 'Dove' is of my own creation, working off various Thunderbird depictions. The blue background (bead color not represented in image, rough draft) is more Plains Indian (recalling from memory).
The Sweeping (weeping) Heart is again of my own design.
There is no branch in the dove's beaker and I left feet out, it is more shaped of my patchbox - sorry, I do not see "Israel" in any of it?

And not sure how you feel I am censoring God in any way shape or form? Please explain so I may understand
 
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Plz let me explain perhaps god is speaking through you
The dove (doesnt need a branch ) baptism of jesus the hear t, well god made you ,you made it right ? Also the color purple is royal(we are all preist kings ,are we not? Blue is the color god commands his people wear at least a single thread ,right.
And you are not censoring me .
But read the site rules about god?
Which I will never comply with!
 
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Plz let me explain perhaps god is speaking through you
The dove (doesnt need a branch ) baptism of jesus the hear t, well god made you ,you made it right ? Also the color purple is royal(we are all preist kings ,are we not? Blue is the color god commands his people wear at least a single thread ,right.
And you are not censoring me .
But read the site rules about god?
Which I will never comply with!
Uh....okay, I guess.
Wow, I had no idea that Native American Indians where so much into the Bible...who knew.
(btw: God is a 'proper noun', a 'name' and therefore the 'G' is capitalized)
 
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Uh....okay, I guess.
Wow, I had no idea that Native American Indians where so much into the Bible...who knew.
(btw: God is a 'proper noun', a 'name' and therefore the 'G' is capitalized)
God is not a name its a title
YHWH MOST HIGH well thats a whole different . And yes we were even before the first settlers!
Hey Jah jah jah think on that when you dance with your head bowed in reverenc!
 

Beau Robbins

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After years of trying many beading threads with limited satisfaction I finally settled on two things. The first is that I highly recommend beading almost exclusively with artificial sinew for size 12⁰ and larger. You really want to fill up the hole as much as you can to keep those things solidly in place. It increases the longevity and durability of the work. With the artificial sinew, you can split it down to exactly the thickness you need, it's cheap, super strong, and it comes already waxed. Secondly you'll want to bead on something sturdy like buckskin or a textile of similar thickness and firmness. For my contemporary work I've always preferred cotton baby sheeting like you'd see used to line cribs. It's hard to find these days though. I have had fully beaded wallets that have been carried in my back pocket for over a decade with little to no damage.
 
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After years of trying many beading threads with limited satisfaction I finally settled on two things. The first is that I highly recommend beading almost exclusively with artificial sinew for size 12⁰ and larger. You really want to fill up the hole as much as you can to keep those things solidly in place. It increases the longevity and durability of the work. With the artificial sinew, you can split it down to exactly the thickness you need, it's cheap, super strong, and it comes already waxed. Secondly you'll want to bead on something sturdy like buckskin or a textile of similar thickness and firmness. For my contemporary work I've always preferred cotton baby sheeting like you'd see used to line cribs. It's hard to find these days though. I have had fully beaded wallets that have been carried in my back pocket for over a decade with little to no damage.
I am using smoked brain tan buckskin and yes, artificial sinew - beading thread actually, its nylon so same thing.
Trouble I have found is keeping my rows straight, perhaps a smaller piece would be easier, but I go Big. In the future however I will draw my lines! A video tutorial said "You really dont need to mark your lines, they fall in place....." - Not so for this beginner, but I am making it work.

Another thing I found is to NOT over tighten, I have a few where the end bead(s) rolled over. But...pressing on
 

Beau Robbins

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Yeah tension is important. Keep it uniform. I should have mentioned these things that are coming to me now since it's been years since I've really beaded. Draw your patterns and lines!
 

waksupi

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Nylon thread deteriorates with extended exposure to sunlight. Cotton wrapped polyester in a tan color works well, well waxed. Artificial sinew is the absolute worst you can use.
You will find it easier to make an attractive piece with 12 or 13 beads.
As for not following old designs, not a good idea in the beginning. It helps learn tribal distinctions and color use. Doing your own pattern is a masters realm, and not for a beginner.
That being said, after the first 40-50 million beads, they go pretty easy. I'm pretty biased on this stuff, having done museum restoration for 32 years.
A few of my projects in my camp.
bear save.jpg

oldies 119.jpg
 
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Nylon thread deteriorates with extended exposure to sunlight. Cotton wrapped polyester in a tan color works well, well waxed. Artificial sinew is the absolute worst you can use.
You will find it easier to make an attractive piece with 12 or 13 beads.
As for not following old designs, not a good idea in the beginning. It helps learn tribal distinctions and color use. Doing your own pattern is a masters realm, and not for a beginner.
That being said, after the first 40-50 million beads, they go pretty easy. I'm pretty biased on this stuff, having done museum restoration for 32 years.
A few of my projects in my camp.View attachment 151394
View attachment 151393
Nice quiver!
By "12 or 13" I assume you mean 'beads per stitch'?
I have started out with 8/per but as my rows did not stay straight I am tweaking it 6 or 7 trying to straighten it back out.
It will work for this time around, next time I will certainly mark a grid to guide my rows straighter and be mindful of over tightening the thread.

Don't think UV Ray's will be much trouble with this piece as the beads cover the thread well and I dont plan on letting it set out in the sun much.
 

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waksupi

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Nice quiver!
By "12 or 13" I assume you mean 'beads per stitch'?
I have started out with 8/per but as my rows did not stay straight I am tweaking it 6 or 7 trying to straighten it back out.
It will work for this time around, next time I will certainly mark a grid to guide my rows straighter and be mindful of over tightening the thread.

Don't think UV Ray's will be much trouble with this piece as the beads cover the thread well and I dont plan on letting it set out in the sun much.
I meant the bead size.

I tell you of UV from my own experience. Don't be surprised when it rots away in a few years.
 

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