1814

Discussion in 'Share Your Persona' started by 54ball, Aug 3, 2012.

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  1. Aug 3, 2012 #1

    54ball

    54ball

    54ball

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    Fort Jackson Mississippi Territory
    May 10 1814

    Dear Elizabeth,

    My Beth I take pen in hand to give my love to you. Please give my love to the the children and my mother. Tell James I thank him for I know all is safe under his care. Many haere have thanked me for the work James and our boys have done at their farms while they are away.
    I got a scratch on my foot from the Battle of the Horseshoe. I now have a scar and a story but do not fret all is healed fine. I have a real redstick club for Cole but do not tell him as I want it to be a surprize.
    I still think about the fine land I seen October last under Coffee.
    I miss you and will see you soon.


    My Beth This page will wind up ash but I write you all the same.
    Only now am I able to fit my shoe. Many a time i thought I mite die. It is just now I am able to rite you with a clear head. I feel as if I Have Awoken from a dream but the Dream was my Youth. Years ago seem like yesterday the Horshoe seems like years ago.
    I remember my father how he would have me read The Scripture to James.
    I see my Uncle coming to the house with his warriors when my father was away telling my mother that the Great General and his Red headed woman were killed at a place called Kings Hill. This would be bad for the Cherokee and he and his band were heading deep to the mountains.

    I see Col. Sevier at the door with father's horse and rifle. The only time I ever saw tears on James' dark face is when I presented to him our father's rifle.

    I returned to the times of peace when my Uncle taught me the ways of the Cherokee. My first and only ball game along with my cousin Edward Turkey Eye. Our hunt our fight with with Creeks.

    I remembered the wars. Uncle came along with that cannibal DoubleHead. I remember how Uncle was proud that the Cherokee were going to treat peace with the Wataugans.

    Then I am awaken by James, Rifle fire far away. Then we see smoke from over the ridge far away from the Cavlvert's cabin. Edward Turkey Eye alone and on foot appeared later from over the ridge. He was covered in blood. He cradeled a book not just a book but The Book stained with the blood of the Innocent.

    DoubleHead and his band after treating and feasting with the whites headed home. On their way they met a Creek murder party. The old cannibal could not resist and joined the Creeks in atacking the whites they have just treated with.

    Turkey Eye struggled with the next. As they traveled home they fell upon Calvert's station that morning. After an exchange of fire Doublehead compelled the Calverts to come out with terms of peace promising to spare their lives.

    Calvert agreed and threw down their rifles. When the men came out Doublehead and his trusted fell upon them killing them. Sarah Calvert tried to protect her children. She held the Book as if a shield from Doubleheads murderous companions. They stopped as if afraid to step further. It was at this moment Doublehead rushed forward burying his hatchet in Sarah's head.

    Turkey Eye at this moment took aim at Doublehead with his rifle, Uncle knocked him from his horse with his. Saving both their lives. Turkey Eye watched in terror as Doublehead finished the Children. Vann another chief tried to take a child to safety Doublehead sank his hatchet agin into the head of the child as he lay in Vann's lap. The other child was delivered to the Creeks for safty. I found out later they bashed her brains out a few miles up the trail.

    James and I tended to the Calverts. The Indian in me dying. I knew these people. When Sevier came I joined him. Turkey Eye was safe in the root cellar. We burned a few towns but fired no shots. It was like they had vanished. Uncle fell later that year, I'm glad not at my hand.

    Then my mind came to you my Darlin. How you were mistreated by your dead mother's husband. I remember as if yesterday seeing you bruised. I hardly knowed of you but that did not stop me from busting down old Horton's door and bringing you home. O had I Knew all you Endoured I would have killed him, instead the bottle cheated me.
    I remember how we said our vows in front of mother, James and the servants. I remember Preacher Jason the Methodist rider repeting the same a year later to deliver us from "sin".

    Our children Erskine my first born son whom we knew only a day, our Daughter Francina of thirteen years and our son Cole of twelve.

    We have done well. James married Sally and our servents are happy most of the time. James reminds them sometimes harshly what life is like amongst the Georgians and Carolinians.
    Things were well, there was an occasional Creek tresspass and killing now and then but too few to worry.

    Then the Creeks Arose. Like an Indian screaming his war whoop from the past. The memories from the Cherokee Wars awaken the warrior in me once again. Murder on the Tensaw at Fort Mimms. Five hundered killt. Women and children murdered in the way only the perverse Savage mind could imagine. I think of the Calvert child, more blood spilled by Creek calling themselves Redstick hands.

    So I ride with Coffee. We Burn the Black Warrior towns in October. Then we have two big fights. Tuckabatchee and Talladega. In one they fought nearly to the last man the other many escaped. There was not one company with out some one wounded or killed. Then we starved. At the end of our term last December i returned to you. General Jackson said we had not done our term but we came home to Tennessee just the same.

    After seeing you and all mine in good repair I left out February last.
    When I return I find that Jackson was nearly beaten at Emfaukau. If not for the brave wounded Coffee and the heroic gun crew Jackson would have lost his guns. This was the first try at the Horseshoe.

    By March we had some real Bluebellies in the 39th Infantry. Plus some more west Tennesseans.

    We try agin for the Horseshoe. I am with Coffee's spies and the Cherokees across the Tallapoosa on the outside of the Horseshoe to prevent escape. While General Jackson and the bulk of the army assault the rude log wall inside the Horseshoe.

    At about ten that mornin Jackson's small battery begun it's cannonade. I found out later that the grape of his small cannon had little affect on that rude log palisade.

    The cannon fire was just too much for the friendly Creeks and Cherokee. We were able to fire at the few redstick warriors across the river. All at once a warrior who earned a new name "Whale" swam the river and fetched a Redstick canoe. Then nearly all the Freindly Indians including myself crossed the river. We easily swept through their few pickets. The Indian in me was filled. We swept through their village I can still hear the screams of the women and children. Some believed this to be holy ground that would kill invaders. So when they saw us they screamed as if their world was coming to an end. In away it was.

    When Jackson heard our firing behind the wall he sent his blue bellies and the bulk of the militia against it's jagged walls. The fighting was fierce. So much so my brain does not recall it all. When their line broke they had to go through us to make the river. Here is where I got my wound. A Redstick naked came charging i fired and he fell another followed close behind weilding a club. I countered his blow with my gun. Causing him to miss a fatal blow but still having enough swing to pierce my shoe with the iron of his club. I then fell upon him with my knife. With my weight upon him him I felt his life escape.

    I was in a trance after that I remember little. The next moment I remember is having my knife at the ready to take his scalp. I was about to do it when I came to. I let him go grabbed his club and found my gun, broken. I could hear the firing from across the river as the Redsticks tried to cross. They were shot on the banks and in the water. Even in roots of washed out great trees provided them with no refuge from Coffee's spies and riflemen across the river.

    As darkness approached the firing slowed. I began to see the carnage around me. A group of Cherokees were playing a game with a dead Redstick. The man was dead on a dead horse. The warriors would hold a bottle to his mouth and all would say he drunk, he drink too much as they pushed his body back and fourth.

    In the dim light I saw a Tennessean shoot a sitting ancient man wrapped in a blanket. I saw another group skin a Redstick to make a belt. I saw Cherokees and friendly Creeks cutting off noses for Jackson's count.

    In the midst of this I find Turkey Eye sitting on a log reading Sarah Calvert's Bible. With my help Turkey Eye had learned to read and had read it at least ten times through. he looked around and then at me, "savages, savages" I said at least we do not kill children, at least not on purpose". He said "We came to fight the savage but in doing so We have become savages ourselves". "We are the whirlwind from the wind they sowed at Mimms and even I at Calverts Station".

    It was here that the old ways died in me. I want no more WAr.

    Your loving husband
    Travis
     
  2. Aug 6, 2012 #2

    54ball

    54ball

    54ball

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    This was my attempt at a letter from Travis Marrs to his wife Elizabeth.
    Marrs had just recovered from a severe wound that nearly cost him his leg if not his life. Much of what he wrote was triggered by the severe battle he had exprienced. Most of the letter was burned when he had a clearer head.

    Keep in mind this is 1813 not 2012. Marrs is a man of his time. He is not rich but nor is he a poor farmer.
    He is 41 in 1813. He is of mixed decent, mainly Cherokee and Scots-Irish. He is the son of an Overthemountan man who fell at Kings Mountain in 1780.

    I tried to make James a mystery. He has the features of a African American and Cherokee. He is Marrs' older brother. Whether he is from a union prior to his father or a full brother, Travis Marrs does not know for sure. James is a skilled farmer and hunter who is trusted like no other. He runs the farm and acts as overseer to the few servents or slaves on the Marrs farm. I tried to show the diversity of just about all old southern families. Just about all have secrets.

    Mother is Cherokee and the main reason the Marrs were not molested durring the Cherokee Wars of the 1790s.

    Uncle brother of Marrs' mother, it was his duty to raise his sisters sons as Cherokee. This he tries to do this after the death of his brother in law at Kings Mountain.
    Edward Turkey Eye is a Cherokee cousin. He is gifted with perception and incredible vision.

    Doublehead, Vann and Sevier are historical figures.

    The Calverts are based on Doubleheads raid on Cavett's Station outside of Knoxville in the Cherokee War of 1794.

    Fort Mimms was one of the bloodiest acts in American history. It was the Pearl Harbor or 911 of it's day.

    Horseshoe Bend was a brutal bloody conflict. Out of over 1000 Creeks in the Redstick faction 800 were killed an unknown number were killed in the Tallapoosa River that ran red with blood. The women and children were taken by the Cherokee and allied friendly Creeks. About 20 Redsticks were taken alive.

    The bible story is based on true events if my info was correct.
     
  3. Sep 22, 2012 #3

    redwing

    redwing

    redwing

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    My Grt Gf of that era was Capt. Jonas Loughmiller who led the charge on the Creek Fort at the Battle of Horseshoe Bend. He was in the East Tenn, Militia under Major Allison I think.

    I just found out that he was buried North of Bedford, Indiana in 1845. I hope to visit his grave some day. :thumbsup:
     
  4. Nov 2, 2017 #4

    md2020

    md2020

    md2020

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    Wonderful. .
    I am a descendent of George Washington Bankester, an Indian child found on the property of Cyrus Sibley in Baldwin County near what would become Blakeley. According to family stories, he was left in such a way that he would be found. Cyrus had allowed a group of friendly Indians, possibly some of Jackson's Cherokees, to camp on his property and the toddler was found when the property was inspected. Other than the possibility of these Cherokee leaving one of their own children, he may have been picked up from the battle at the Horseshoe ( you mentioned this). Side note: I know that some Cherokee were disgusted with Jackson, some walked away into Florida and I've heard of some going into LA. I have ties to Mims and Tensaw ancestors. ..Excellent persona.
     
  5. Nov 2, 2017 #5

    Nativearizonan

    Nativearizonan

    Nativearizonan

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    Nicely done, terrible story.

    My wife just took a DNA test which agreed with her family story of Cherokee ancestry. Her G-grandmother was carried as a baby on the Trail of Tears, and was still alive in the 1920s, anyway, as my wife's mother knew her, and she (wife's mother) was born in 1925, or thereabouts. Wife's G-grandmother would have to have been at least 90 years old at that time. Some of the family members had always said that story was a lie, but the DNA doesn't lie; she showed a very strong link. I think her aunt and sister just didn't want to be Indian, in that time period where they were always looked on as the bad guys in books, movies and such.

    History books have really ignored the large amount of mixing that took place in the South. Your story presents it well.
     
  6. Apr 19, 2018 #6

    Redstick Lee

    Redstick Lee

    Redstick Lee

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    really good !

    I live in the area that was both Cherokee and Creek depending on what season it was......i'm 10 miles north of Tallasehatchee and have sat on the rock wall atop Chocolocco mountain that was the informal division/property line.
     

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