1730's Colonial Arms

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zimmerstutzen

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I live within a couple miles of Cresap's Fort which in the 1730's was part of Maryland's effort to repulse Pennsylvania's attempts to "steal" Maryland territory. For almost a year, a 300 man Maryland Militia force occupied the West shore of the Susquehanna to keep Pennsylvanians out, and to collect taxes from those who settled south of the 40th parallel. (the border according to both charters)
I know Matchlocks were pretty well phased out in Europe by that time. What would the Maryland Militia men be equipped with? I suppose they may have still been using some antiquated weapons, but what?
 

Alden

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They almost certainly would not have been using matchlocks then but, at worst, converted them to Jacobean or simpler doglocks. Those would have been quite old by then but around I'm sure. Probably alot of older doglock muskets and even early traditional flintlock-locked guns by then too which would have been around for decades (especially in Europe)...
 

Flintlock1640

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Are matchlocks found in America in the archaeological record? It was my understanding that the colonists usually had better firearm technology than Europe. A colonist can buy a flintlock but the Europeans had arsenals full of matchlocks so they were more or less forced to continue using them past their expiration date. I would be amazed if a matchlock was in use in America after 1700.
 

tenngun

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There is an American made matchlock at the Museum of the ozarks. The feeling was it was some sort of apprentice piece.
I would bet on doglocks, and oarbutts as ‘old militia guns’.
 

Cruzatte

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My sense in reading The French Trade Gun in North America by Kevin Gladysz, and The Fusil de Tulle in New France 1691-1741 by Russel Bouchard is that the French military had abandoned the matchlock mousquet by 1700 and went entirely over to the flintlock.
Flintlock trade guns were available in New France in the 1690s, and maybe earlier. I'm not sure about the Dutch in Nieuw Nederland before the English took possession.
 

tenngun

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There was a shooting match from the 1730s Pennsylvania that offered as a prize a “snaphaunce’ rifle.
I’ve mentioned this before on the forum and a response I got was :
A) it may have been a word misapplied to a flint lock, or dog lock
B) it may have been a new gun or a rebuild made with an out dated lock
C) snaphaunces were made longer in to the eighteenth century then we credit
 

Rudyard

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I would opt for A, But no doubt snaphances where still used till they wore out, But unlikely to be made anew by that date. The Italians persisted with Snaphances but they where an exception . Rudyard
 

buckskinner35

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I would opt for A, But no doubt snaphances where still used till they wore out, But unlikely to be made anew by that date. The Italians persisted with Snaphances but they where an exception . Rudyard
I agree with Rudyard on this. I suppose it could also have been a old smoothbore snap which was rifled by a gunsmith somewhere to make it more useful. But that would have been a lot of someones time and money to put into an old gun.
 

tenngun

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I would think A is the best bet.
They weren’t as picky about language then.
 

Loyalist Dave

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I suppose they may have still been using some antiquated weapons, but what
A Particular of such Armes and Ammunition as are intended & required by the Conditions abovesaid to be provided & carried into the said Province of Maryland for every man betweene the ages of sixteene & fifty yeares wch shalbe transported thether.

Imprmis one muskett or bastard muskett with a snaphance lock
Item ten pound of powder
Item fourty pound of lead bulletts, pistoll & goose shott, each sort some
Item one sword and belt
Item one bandelier & flask
dated at London, tenth day of November 1641


17th April 1666
In the Lower Howse of Assembly

Mr Speaker motions the House Concerning a magazine to be kept in every County for the Security of each County against the Incursion of Indians or otherwise & whither it be judged necessary or not ?
In the Affirmative Necessary
Then as to the proportion of powder Shot & other Implements of War and put to the Vote
Voted necessary that there be 400lb Gunpowder 4200th Shot or lead Snaphance Musketts high Caluver [caliber] bore
140 Cutlashes & Belts
fifty Carabines for Horsemen
two dozen Bullettmolds high Caluver bore
two dozen of Carabine Bullet Moulds
to be equally distributed into the several Countys of this Province when purchased to remain there in the Charge & Custody of such Person or Persons as the Lieut General of this Province shall nominate & appoint for a publick Magazine for each County


1696
An Accot of the Arms &ca brought in and in Good Ordr lodged at the House of Majr Dorsey within the Port of Annapolis, the 18th day of September Anno Domini 1696.
Armes lodged
200 Pistolls with Round locks, Varnisht Stock and brass Caps
100 Carabines with round locks & Varnisht Stocks
80 Byonets


Some of the above references are close to 70 years before Cresap's Fort, and it's quite possible that the muskets used at Cresaps were English Lock (dog-lock) muskets

LD
 

Rudyard

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Exellent references ,Don't you just love the flowery quaint style . 'Which is the hight of the bore & not the Piece' ' The bigger shoots are better than the smaller shoots , Sith they doth murder more be it far or nere & better cheap." Wonderfull stuff . "Most of our pieces Goe with English locks' ect . The' round locks' would likely be flintlocks by that later date .
Rudyard
 

Baxter

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These quoted documents are delightful to read.
An observation: The more historical reference which I read, the more favorably I perceive France in arms development and colonial warfare, if not continental.
 

zimmerstutzen

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Your sources are more contemporaneous to the Battle of the Severn. The fights between the colonies, All Englishmen, seems a hoot except that people were killed. Invasions, prior claims, retaking territory by force etc. Maryland was fighting off errant settlers, round heads, other countries, the Pennsylvanians, Indians and Virginians for almost a century. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_the_Severn
 
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I live within a couple miles of Cresap's Fort which in the 1730's was part of Maryland's effort to repulse Pennsylvania's attempts to "steal" Maryland territory. For almost a year, a 300 man Maryland Militia force occupied the West shore of the Susquehanna to keep Pennsylvanians out, and to collect taxes from those who settled south of the 40th parallel. (the border according to both charters)
I know Matchlocks were pretty well phased out in Europe by that time. What would the Maryland Militia men be equipped with? I suppose they may have still been using some antiquated weapons, but what?
Interesting! BTW, as a Pennsylvanian, I'm glad we didn't get any of Maryland! You're current gun laws are a bit harsh! Seriously, I didn't know about Cresap's, will look into it! Thanks.
 

zimmerstutzen

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Actually, Pennsylvania won a strip of about 27 miles by 300 miles from Maryland. The cities of Philadelphia Chester and York were all in territory that rightfully belonged to Maryland under the two royal charters. Penn sold off land so fast in Chester County, PA that the Marylanders couldn't act fast enough to keep them out. They did send tax collectors who were largely ignored or even arrested by the Pennsylvanians.
 

FlinterNick

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I live within a couple miles of Cresap's Fort which in the 1730's was part of Maryland's effort to repulse Pennsylvania's attempts to "steal" Maryland territory. For almost a year, a 300 man Maryland Militia force occupied the West shore of the Susquehanna to keep Pennsylvanians out, and to collect taxes from those who settled south of the 40th parallel. (the border according to both charters)
I know Matchlocks were pretty well phased out in Europe by that time. What would the Maryland Militia men be equipped with? I suppose they may have still been using some antiquated weapons, but what?
1700-1730 Flintlocks were pretty standard. I wouldn't’ expect to see too many matchlock or rudimentary flintlocks such as wheel locks, or snapnaches, Your standard Smoothbore Arm of the time was a single bridled flintlock (with some upgrades such as a pan bride to make the lock double bridled).

Imported Dutch Muskets were very common throughout the colonies, these guns were larger heavier guns with 44-50 inch barrels a round face lock and larger buttstock, some caliber as high as .80 and wooden ramrods. Often these muskets were stocked to the muzzle, not allowing for a socket bayonet, so a plug type of bayonet was used.

Your standard type of British muskets would have been earlier English muskets, such as a James Musket and or Queen Ann Musket, some of these muskets were equipped with older Dog Locks, Iron Furniture and wooden ramrods.

One key feature of earlier smoothbore musket was that the barrels were often 1/4 Octagon at the breech and then round for the remainder of the gun.
 

Rudyard

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Very nice mix of styles & dates I particularly like the early original flint piece beutifull gun it just screams charecter . Thank you for showing us it. Regards Rudyard
 

rickystl

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WKD: Yes, very cool pics!!! I've always liked these earlier guns. Here are a couple of pre-1730 pistols:
First one is a 1690's French pistol. The second is a 1710 British Queen Ann period pistol.
RickDSC00029 (Medium).JPG DSC00790 (Medium).JPG
 
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