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  1. Stophel

    Linen pillow ticking for shirt?

    very, very heavy for a shirt. Think 5oz. ;)
  2. Stophel

    Barrel steels

    Oh, someone will... along with Remington shotgun barrels.... More frightening than the choice of steel, though, is someone making a gun barrel who has no idea what they are doing.
  3. Stophel

    Books of Buckskinning worth getting?

    I have some of the Books of Buckskinning, but not all. As has been said, they lean heavily towards the "mountain man ronnyvoo" aspects, and historicity is a bit off... Mark Baker's "A Pilgrim's Journey" is a collection of his magazine articles. These are also somewhat dated, particularly the...
  4. Stophel

    Anyone Ever see One of these J. Russwell &Co Green River Works

    This one has a completely different handle, but the same bevel on the spine of the blade that yours has.
  5. Stophel

    Anyone Ever see One of these J. Russwell &Co Green River Works

    Table knife. Late 19th, maybe early 20th century. Someone more familiar with the marks may be able to date it more precisely.
  6. Stophel

    d-rings

    I can only assume it is meant to be a shoulder strap that just isn't shown well in the picture. The decoration is just some squiggly lines, but I would bet is meant to represent some coat of arms.
  7. Stophel

    Small game loops on bags

    Probably a pretty good date. These were used well into the 20th century. They often have shell loops for shotgun shells inside (this one has clear impressions on the back where shells were carried). All the Rapid Rivets kinda indicate a later date too.... :)
  8. Stophel

    Small game loops on bags

    Looking around the internet for something else, I happened upon this. https://www.catawiki.com/lots/12827815-magnificent-small-game-bag-cartridge-bag-1900-1910-magnificent-piece-with-two-compartments-falconry-bag-falconry-saddle-leather
  9. Stophel

    d-rings

    A Beutler (bag maker). And something about him becoming a brother in a cloister.. or something... These are hardly average joe shooting bags. These would be used by the wealthy/nobility for shooting, or probably more likely, falconry. I believe falconers bags are still made in these types...
  10. Stophel

    d-rings

    In European art, I see probably at least as many belt bags as shoulder bags from the first half of the century. Even in Dodderidge's day, they were still being used, as he mentioned. The trend toward the latter half of the century was to put everything on shoulder straps. Look at military...
  11. Stophel

    d-rings

    Most likely. There is nothing more German than that cheek stock wheel lock gun. Even the coat cuffs are German. ;)
  12. Stophel

    d-rings

    I think the hat with cap descriptions are mostly referring to the practice of wearing your felt hat on top of a thin knit cap (ALWAYS shown as being red, white, and blue... at least as far as I have seen). I presume, basically mostly by men with shaved heads, in lieu of wearing a wig. So far...
  13. Stophel

    d-rings

    The image is an engraving by Johann Elias Ridinger. It is German, mid 18th century, but I would have to do some looking to find a more specific date. It is a wheel lock gun, which were made and used WELL into the 18th century. There is nothing Italian, nor Tudor about it. If one looks...
  14. Stophel

    Small game loops on bags

    18th century German duck hunter, with his game bag overflowing.
  15. Stophel

    d-rings

    "Authentic" for who, when, and where? The rings do provide for a much better hanging bag to fit the wearer better, and accommodate movement better, but if we're talking average Joe American 18th or 19th century, I think it's best to leave them off. I think we today sometimes want to get too...
  16. Stophel

    Small game loops on bags

    Historically correct for when and where??? The style of shot bag in the picture is German, 19th century. I don't recall off hand whether or not I have seen small game loops on an old bag like this or not, but it's possible. You'll run into less historical trouble if your loops were plain...
  17. Stophel

    I don't like to use a ball starter.

    Any time anyone comes along and says "there's no evidence that such-and-such was done or used in this period of history" there's always a number of people who seem to take great personal offense to such statements, and begin in with the "who are you to tell me what to do!" type "arguments", when...
  18. Stophel

    1860 vs 1851 Issues

    Before getting a cap rake, check the hammer nose and make sure there aren't any burrs or other ugliness there, and with a small stone or diamond file, gently knock off the sharp corners in the pin notch. See if that helps before going further. ;)
  19. Stophel

    I don't like to use a ball starter.

    Round grooves ARE "original style rifling". Both round and square grooves (among other oddball shapes) were used in the 18th century, with probably the large majority of them being round (and deeper than they are today...).
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