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Crewdawg445 
58 Cal.
Posts: 2174
Crewdawg445
09-30-18 05:12 AM - Post#1704726    


Been in the family for awhile and remember seeing it at my grandmother's house as a child. My mother passed it on my way yesterday and obviously was tickled to death. Best I can find is early 1800's?

Walnut scales, single iron pin and poured pewter decorative designs. Beautiful little fork! It's the lite trinkets such as this that spark excitement and curiosity on it's past.



Listen, or your tounge will make you deaf.


 
Native Arizonan 
54 Cal.
Posts: 1606
09-30-18 08:37 AM - Post#1704741    

    In response to Crewdawg445

I have a few of those, just like that but every one with a different pewter design poured into the handle. I picked them up at a couple different yard sales, and don't know any of the history. I definitely would be interested in hearing what others think about the age and why.

 
BullRunBear 
45 Cal.
Posts: 651
09-30-18 12:41 PM - Post#1704787    

    In response to Crewdawg445

Nice family memento. My hometown was established about 20 years after Plymouth and I was lucky enough to grow up able to see these domestic items, the changing architecture and fashions in home life, etc. I suspect these things sparked my interest in history which eventually included BP weapons and accessories. This in turn led to curiosity about how they fed themselves (gardening, fishing and hunting), produced cloth and clothing (curing pelts, weaving and sewing/knitting), made tools and building materials (blacksmithing, knowledge of trees) and many other matters.

All this can start with a simple fork or candle mold. Kind of cool.

Jeff


 
Colorado Clyde 
Cannon
Posts: 15524
Colorado Clyde
09-30-18 12:47 PM - Post#1704789    

    In response to Crewdawg445

I have some identical to those....


 
Black Hand 
Cannon
Posts: 7763
Black Hand
09-30-18 02:11 PM - Post#1704808    

    In response to Crewdawg445

I have one very similar and a knife to match.

 
Black Hand 
Cannon
Posts: 7763
Black Hand
09-30-18 02:28 PM - Post#1704811    

    In response to BullRunBear

  • BullRunBear Said:
Nice family memento. My hometown was established about 20 years after Plymouth and I was lucky enough to grow up able to see these domestic items, the changing architecture and fashions in home life, etc. I suspect these things sparked my interest in history which eventually included BP weapons and accessories. This in turn led to curiosity about how they fed themselves (gardening, fishing and hunting), produced cloth and clothing (curing pelts, weaving and sewing/knitting), made tools and building materials (blacksmithing, knowledge of trees) and many other matters.

All this can start with a simple fork or candle mold. Kind of cool.

Jeff




I think mine started with a book - The Mystic Warriors of the Plains by Thomas Mails.


 
juice jaws 
45 Cal.
Posts: 502
juice jaws
09-30-18 05:39 PM - Post#1704847    

    In response to Crewdawg445

What is the over all length and how long are the fork tangs? Very nice and something to be proud of.

 
Crewdawg445 
58 Cal.
Posts: 2174
Crewdawg445
09-30-18 06:00 PM - Post#1704853    

    In response to juice jaws

Not entirely sure, it's certainly not a child's fork as I've seen some of those. I'll have to take some measurements.

Lucky my mother is also into period antiques and primitives!
Listen, or your tounge will make you deaf.


 
tenngun 
Cannon
Posts: 8044
tenngun
09-30-18 09:09 PM - Post#1704861    

    In response to Crewdawg445

I have several similar, have always thought they were Victorian era

 
Crewdawg445 
58 Cal.
Posts: 2174
Crewdawg445
10-01-18 07:04 AM - Post#1704883    

    In response to tenngun

Appears they may be more common, as to who the maker may be I'm clueless.
Listen, or your tounge will make you deaf.


 
Rifleman1776 
Cannon
Posts: 14825
Rifleman1776
10-01-18 09:54 AM - Post#1704906    

    In response to Crewdawg445

As nice as that keepsake is, it is a very common fork. I have several and they are often found in antique shops and flea markets.

 
tenngun 
Cannon
Posts: 8044
tenngun
10-01-18 10:48 AM - Post#1704917    

    In response to Rifleman1776

Lots in antique stores and junk shops around here... but never a spoon, I wonder why.
I mostly just carry a spoon any more to events or trekking.

 
Crewdawg445 
58 Cal.
Posts: 2174
Crewdawg445
10-01-18 11:16 AM - Post#1704920    

    In response to tenngun

It'll get used! Already found it's space within my market wallet along with my horn spoon.
Listen, or your tounge will make you deaf.


 
tenngun 
Cannon
Posts: 8044
tenngun
10-01-18 11:21 AM - Post#1704923    

    In response to Crewdawg445



 
Scott_C 
36 Cal.
Posts: 92
Scott_C
10-01-18 08:25 PM - Post#1705039    

    In response to tenngun

Pretty sure those stamped forks and knives are 1850s on. Prior to the industrial revolution they were forged and still partially round/oval instead of flat.


 
Artificer 
Cannon
Posts: 7872
10-04-18 06:28 PM - Post#1705615    

    In response to Scott_C

It will be interesting to see if some of this kind of forks/knives come up on the excavation of the Steamboat Malta, that sank in the Missouri in 1841. I don't believe the OP's fork is quite that early, but it would be a neat surprise, if so.

Right now, these are fine forks and knives for Civil War Era reenacting, but I'm not comfortable going further back than that.

Gus

 
Claude 
Cannon
Posts: 13940
Claude
10-04-18 06:38 PM - Post#1705617    

    In response to Artificer

If you Google "old three tine fork" and select "images"...





 
Scott_C 
36 Cal.
Posts: 92
Scott_C
10-05-18 08:42 PM - Post#1705767    

    In response to Claude

The older forks will be round where the handle attaches. Similar to a large two-tinned meat fork, but smaller with 3 or even 4 tines.

If they are flat/stamped they are Mexican War era or later.

Sorry I don't know how to post a picture. This site has them with fancy carved handles if you scroll down.
https://www.askandyaboutclothes.com/lifestyle/the-history-of...

Edited by Scott_C on 10-05-18 08:43 PM. Reason for edit: No reason given.

 
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