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Login Name Post: DIY kettle anyone?        (Topic#307565)
Tall Hat 
32 Cal.
Posts: 18
06-03-18 08:17 PM - Post#1688045    


I have seen some stuff on the net about a DIY kettle, it sure looked like it was made of a grease pot.
Mainly looking for a personal kettle I can boil some water in or make coffee,small meal, stuff like that.

Anyone made a kettle or bought another type container to make a kettle out of?

 
Tall Hat 
32 Cal.
Posts: 18
06-03-18 08:36 PM - Post#1688050    

    In response to Tall Hat

I think it would also be called a corn boiler.

 
Black Hand 
Cannon
Posts: 7450
Black Hand
06-03-18 09:25 PM - Post#1688063    

    In response to Tall Hat

  • Tall Hat Said:
Anyone made a kettle or bought another type container to make a kettle out of?


Why not just buy a pot or kettle? It avoids wasting $500 worth of time and effort for a $15-30 item....


 
Tall Hat 
32 Cal.
Posts: 18
06-03-18 10:30 PM - Post#1688071    

    In response to Black Hand

I like to tinker.
And I have not seen any kettles for that kind of price.
Ill likely keep shopping but thought Id see if any one had made one.

 
Black Hand 
Cannon
Posts: 7450
Black Hand
06-03-18 10:43 PM - Post#1688073    

    In response to Tall Hat

  • Tall Hat Said:
I like to tinker.
And I have not seen any kettles for that kind of price.
Ill likely keep shopping but thought Id see if any one had made one.


OK - Wasting $500 worth of time and effort for a $40-50 item.

Look at the 1/2 gallon Brass bucket for $38. The ears aren't the most period correct, but the kettle is sound. I've carried one for years.

 
Colorado Clyde 
Cannon
Posts: 14577
Colorado Clyde
06-03-18 11:43 PM - Post#1688085    

    In response to Tall Hat

Grease pots are usually made from aluminum or stainless steel.....Neither are period correct materials. Not to mention the design would likely be wrong as well.
But, if it's a "bushcraft" thing, have at it.....Post a picture when you're done cause now we're all curious.


 
fleener 
50 Cal.
Posts: 1281
06-04-18 06:19 AM - Post#1688097    

    In response to Black Hand

To each his own. Perhaps he will get $500 worth of satisfaction in making it.

He did not ask our opinions on if he should do it or not, just how.

Live and let live.

Fleener

 
Loyalist Dave 
Cannon
Posts: 6761
Loyalist Dave
06-04-18 07:46 AM - Post#1688104    

    In response to Tall Hat

I took a "Soldier's Mug" and punched two holes in it near the rim..., one by the handle, and one opposite, and used some wire to make a bale for it. (The location of the holes keeps the bale away from the mouth when drinking).

Instead of coming up with something they didn't necessarily have (the domed lid "corn boiler" is documented only as far back as 1976 ), why not convert something they did have and was common?



LD

 
Black Hand 
Cannon
Posts: 7450
Black Hand
06-04-18 08:22 AM - Post#1688107    

    In response to fleener

  • fleener Said:
To each his own. Perhaps he will get $500 worth of satisfaction in making it.

He did not ask our opinions on if he should do it or not, just how.

Live and let live.

Fleener


If we have knowledge, even if the specific question is NOT asked, why should/would we not share it? To omit information that would be useful/valuable, even if not specifically requested, would be intellectually dishonest.

The original question suggests the OP has little knowledge in this area and the first thing I would suggest is READ MORE. Learn everything you can about the question THEN proceed forward. Until you have done this, you still don't know what you don't know and are proceeding somewhat blindly....




 
Claude 
Cannon
Posts: 13825
Claude
06-04-18 08:35 AM - Post#1688109    

    In response to Black Hand

  • Black Hand Said:
  • fleener Said:
To each his own. Perhaps he will get $500 worth of satisfaction in making it.

He did not ask our opinions on if he should do it or not, just how.

Live and let live.

Fleener


If we have knowledge, even if the specific question is NOT asked, why should/would we not share it? To omit information that would be useful/valuable, even if not specifically requested, would be intellectually dishonest.

The original question suggests the OP has little knowledge in this area and the first thing I would suggest is READ MORE. Learn everything you can about the question THEN proceed forward. Until you have done this, you still don't know what you don't know and are proceeding somewhat blindly....


A good teacher knows this.


 
tenngun 
Cannon
Posts: 7710
tenngun
06-04-18 08:43 AM - Post#1688110    

    In response to Tall Hat

  • Tall Hat Said:
I like to tinker.
And I have not seen any kettles for that kind of price.
Ill likely keep shopping but thought Id see if any one had made one.




Tinker? Was a pun intended?

 
Rifleman1776 
Cannon
Posts: 14540
Rifleman1776
06-04-18 10:16 AM - Post#1688132    

    In response to Tall Hat

  • Tall Hat Said:
I like to tinker.
And I have not seen any kettles for that kind of price.
Ill likely keep shopping but thought Id see if any one had made one.



This might sound like heresy
But, prowl through Walmart and other discount and import stores, like Pier 1. Keep a sharp eye and open mind for what they carry. You will (probably) find items that will blend in well with a rendezvous/trekking setting. Just make sure the metals and solders are food safe.

 
Black Hand 
Cannon
Posts: 7450
Black Hand
06-04-18 05:22 PM - Post#1688186    

    In response to Tall Hat

  • Tall Hat Said:
...Id see if any one had made one.


Yes, I've made two (back when I didn't have as much knowledge as I should have had). Neither are in use - one is complete (though the tin lining is patchy and the seams aren't completely sealed after tinning) and the other still needs to be soldered together. Buy a pot/kettle...


 
tenngun 
Cannon
Posts: 7710
tenngun
06-04-18 09:03 PM - Post#1688223    

    In response to Black Hand

We do likes our copper today, and lots of copper and brass pots were used in the old day and sent on to the frontier. In terms of avarage tin kettle was more common in general use.

 
crockett 
Cannon
Posts: 6332
06-06-18 09:59 AM - Post#1688484    

    In response to Tall Hat

From the number of your posts- it looks like you are just getting started- (but maybe I'm wrong ). In any event, I've made a huge amount of errors. I'll assume I know what's what and get some item that "looks old", and then find out it is not like the stuff actually used. I might actually repeat the whole thing, item 1, replaced by item 2, replaced by the even more PC item 3, and so forth.
So if you are going to go to a lot of trouble make sure you spend a lot of time on the research, find an original and get all the details and then copy that.
The other thing common to our past time is finding one original item and then jumping to an assumption this one original item was common. An example might be the heart shaped tobacco pouch shown in ONE PAINTING by Miller:
https://redcdn.net/adphoto/10/01/20/77_1_1200.jpg
All of a sudden it is a standard item thought to be carried by every mountain man, when in reality it might have been a one of a kind item.
If you make such a pot be sure to share, post pictures, etc. We are all on a learning curve

 
Native Arizonan 
54 Cal.
Posts: 1512
06-06-18 03:56 PM - Post#1688521    

    In response to tenngun

  • tenngun Said:
We do likes our copper today, and lots of copper and brass pots were used in the old day and sent on to the frontier. In terms of avarage tin kettle was more common in general use.



I think that depends on the time period. The earlier you go, the more likely it would be copper or bronze. The 1759-60 Ft. Pitt Ledger showed bronze kettles, but no tin kettles. The mass produced tinware was king after the 1830s and through the ACW, until it began to be replaced by "graniteware" in the late 1800s.


 
Black Hand 
Cannon
Posts: 7450
Black Hand
06-06-18 04:14 PM - Post#1688526    

    In response to Native Arizonan

You can't really go wrong with a brass kettle. Construction and ear shape (among other things) varied over time, but brass seems to have been commonly used. Copper seems to be less common, but this is only an impression. Tin-plate appears to be the least durable of all and likely the least expensive when it was available, but again this is an impression (for availability).

An inexpensive brass kettle can be purchased, the cast ears removed and replaced with Dog-ear lugs. This makes it look earlier. That said, very few people know enough about kettles to ID the differences and even less people care if you have cast lugs (I do F&I and left the lugs alone because it wasn't worth the annoyance of replacing them). I have a perfectly serviceable 1/2 gallon tin-lined spun brass kettle that has cooked enough stew and cornmeal to feed an army (enough for 4-6 people per meal) and enough coffee to keep Seattle going for a week....

 
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