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Login Name Post: Need guidance. East Texas 1716        (Topic#307475)
Cruzatte 
50 Cal.
Posts: 1097
Cruzatte
05-30-18 09:21 AM - Post#1687120    

    In response to Dutch Schoultz

  • Dutch Schoultz Said:
I know it is considered to be kind of sexy to speak in codes but sexy is no longer in my didictionary.
Would some knd person define FDC.
In the Muse´d'l'Armee in 1998 I saw several hundred or more French flintlocks in gogeous condition including multiple barrel rifles with as many as four flint mechanisms that must have weighed a ton (or tone)

Gutch Schoultz ETP


FDC= Fusil de Chasse; translation: Hunting Gun. Yeah, I hear you. Abbreviations and acronyms do get a little tedious, don't they?

On a side note (and not to derail the thread) but the French still refer to a shotgun as a fusil de chasse. At least that's what the Google English/French translator gives me.

 
tenngun 
Cannon
Posts: 7726
tenngun
05-30-18 09:24 AM - Post#1687123    

    In response to Dutch Schoultz

We use terms often with definitions not used then. Musket, is a large bore military flintlock that fitted for a bayonet. However it started as a large two man gun with out a bayonet, or later a rifled wepeon made to fire a minnie.
We now have terms of transitional, late classic, Virginia Maryland, early southren, late southren, Tennessee,Ohio,Michigan,early plains late plains.... back in the day they just called them ‘rifles’.
I think todays hunting shot guns are still called fusils de chase in France.

 
Loyalist Dave 
Cannon
Posts: 6771
Loyalist Dave
05-31-18 08:44 AM - Post#1687416    

    In response to Cruzatte

In addition you may see:

QAM = Queen Anne Musket, precursor to the Bess..., sometimes the folks in Europe reference this piece, but not often seen on forums in America

LLP = Long Land Pattern [King's Musket] (Brown Bess) Earliest, versions of the Bess.

SLP = Short Land Pattern [King's Musket] (Brown Bess), the model currently sold by Pedersoli and most commonly found at reenactments.

IPM = India Pattern Musket (Brown Bess) also called the 3rd Model, first used by the British East India Company, and later adopted by the British Army, it's the one used in the Napoleonic Wars.

ECW = English Civil War



Dutch, these you probably know:

AWI = American War of Independence, aka the Revolutionary War.

F&I (or 7YW) = the French & Indian War, which over in Europe is called The 7 Years War.

WONA = War of Northern Aggression, aka the ACW (American Civil War), acronym when it is used, is used most often by those who reenact the Southern side of the ACW



LD


 
Hairy Clipper 
40 Cal.
Posts: 202
Hairy Clipper
06-01-18 01:03 PM - Post#1687688    

    In response to Dutch Schoultz

Dutch-I am guessing here. FDC=Fusil de Chasse

 
satx78247 
Cannon
Posts: 6172
06-01-18 01:39 PM - Post#1687697    

    In response to Hairy Clipper

EXACTLY SO.

yours, satx


 
tenngun 
Cannon
Posts: 7726
tenngun
06-01-18 03:37 PM - Post#1687713    

    In response to satx78247

I’m sorry Dutch I thought you were looking at the Cr 1690 French trade fusils as opposed to the Cr 1740 models. Although both would have been called hunting guns: fusils de chase. Although today we refere to the iron mounted guns of the 1740s as an FDC while the early guns go by different names, names that were meaningless then.

 
Dutch Schoultz 
50 Cal.
Posts: 1063
06-01-18 04:25 PM - Post#1687720    

    In response to tenngun

The French are great when it comes to museums. The problem, as I remember it is that there was case after case of brilliantly lit flintlocks but little signage to tell you what you were looking at.
Now the following is based on a faulty memory but I do not recollect a single percussion rifle.Could that be?
The other thing that stands out in my memory is that the flintlock mechanism seemed to be about 25 to 30% larger than what I am used to on both English and some American guns.
All the while you explore the enormous collection there is an officious gentleman following you shouting No Flashrepeatedly even though you are using the Flash part of your camera…
It isn't easy to go over there and just drop in but I can't recommend a visit to that Museum hihly enough.

When in the Paris museums you get the feeling that Napoleon died about a week ago.


Dutch Schoultz

 
Artificer 
Cannon
Posts: 7519
06-03-18 04:10 AM - Post#1687946    

    In response to Loyalist Dave

David,

I'm not trying to nitpick you, but many of these arms would have been too late for the OP's period between 1716 and more recently when he said he was thinking of going to 1750.

So I took the liberty of removing the ones that do not fit into the time period and these are the ones that remain.

  • Loyalist Dave Said:
In addition you may see:

QAM = Queen Anne Musket, precursor to the Bess..., sometimes the folks in Europe reference this piece, but not often seen on forums in America

LLP = Long Land Pattern [King's Musket] (Brown Bess) Earliest, versions of the Bess.

ECW = English Civil War

Dutch, these you probably know:


LD




Personally, I would have to rule out the LLP British Muskets as the only ones anywhere close to Texas during the period were the P1730's issued to Governor Oglethorpe of GA. There were some skirmishes with the Spanish where some may or would have been lost, but how would those have wound up in Texas in the hands of a French Hunter/Soldier?

I think Dutch Arms would be a possibility, but only after the most probably French Arms of the period.

Maybe I'm missing something here?

Gus

 
tenngun 
Cannon
Posts: 7726
tenngun
06-04-18 09:48 AM - Post#1688122    

    In response to Artificer

Only addendum I would add, that while a Frenchman living on the French Spanish borderlands in America would most likely have a French arm lots of Dutch guns flowed in to the Caribbean and the French did buy guns from the Low Countries.
The Spanish were stingy with their guns. So I would doubt any Spanish gun could get there.
Just before this time was the great age of piracy. And the ‘Carabee’ was the Wild West. Most ships sailed with a stand of private arms. And those stands were loot to be sold. How many could get in to New Orleans and sold up the Mississippi.

 
treestalker 
45 Cal.
Posts: 698
treestalker
06-10-18 06:10 PM - Post#1689205    

    In response to tenngun

Take a look at the article 'A Hunter's Contract' in the May/June 2016 issue of Muzzleloader magazine. It takes place in Nachitoches (pronounced Nack-o Tish) in 1764 and involves a French trader and a hunter. The trader supplied the hunter with 'one gun, a demi-tulle or better kind if it can be found'. I don't know what a demi-tulle is but I would guess a long slim smoothbore French beauty. Good luck in your quest, George.

 
mancill 
40 Cal.
Posts: 151
06-14-18 07:11 AM - Post#1689660    

    In response to treestalker

I have read that article and I think it's the one that put the idea in my head from when I first read it.

 
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