Muzzleloading Forum .....


Contact - Can't Login?
 Page 2 of 2 <12
Login Name Post: homemade buttermilk        (Topic#307214)
Spence10 
Cannon
Posts: 6938
05-17-18 01:00 PM - Post#1685066    

    In response to Colorado Clyde

  • Colorado Clyde Said:
Looks like yogurt....


No, totally different. The curd is soft as thistledown, as they say, and it essentially disappears with a quick stir.

Commercial buttermilk has half a dozen gums and gels in it to make it smooth and creamy, so there is some difference in the texture of the homemade, but not something which is obvious or objectionable.

Spence


 
Colorado Clyde 
Cannon
Posts: 14653
Colorado Clyde
05-17-18 03:04 PM - Post#1685089    

    In response to Spence10

I must admit, It is fascinating all the different things one can make from milk....


 
Spence10 
Cannon
Posts: 6938
05-17-18 04:09 PM - Post#1685099    

    In response to Colorado Clyde

Yes, and by fermentation, all sorts of foods.

Spence

 
Colorado Clyde 
Cannon
Posts: 14653
Colorado Clyde
05-17-18 05:34 PM - Post#1685114    

    In response to Spence10

It's funny, how the tiniest and most "seemingly" insignificant organisms are responsible for our existence...


 
Spence10 
Cannon
Posts: 6938
05-17-18 09:55 PM - Post#1685151    

    In response to Colorado Clyde

Bacteria-R-Us.

Only about 45% of the collection we call Colorado Clyde is made up of human cells, the other 55% are bacteria.

In addition to the bacteria which live on and in us, the power/energy producing factory within each of our cells apparently started as a symbiotic relationship between primitive cells and a bacterium. It has its own DNA and reproduction cycle which parallels cellular reproduction. So we may be bacteria even within most of our body cells.

It's true that we couldn't exist without bacteria, then and now.

We need them for bread and beer, too, of course. And buttermilk.

Spence



 
Colorado Clyde 
Cannon
Posts: 14653
Colorado Clyde
05-17-18 10:27 PM - Post#1685156    

    In response to Spence10

  • Spence10 Said:
Bacteria-R-Us.

Only about 45% of the collection we call Colorado Clyde is made up of human cells, the other 55% are bacteria.


Spence





Oh, I'm not even that much human...


 
Spence10 
Cannon
Posts: 6938
05-18-18 02:51 PM - Post#1685253    

    In response to Colorado Clyde

My 3 liter batch came out perfect. I had wondered if fermenting a big batch would take longer than a small one, it didn't, the process happened exactly on the same schedule, 2 cups or 10.

Spence

 
nhmoose 
58 Cal.
Posts: 2147
nhmoose
05-18-18 04:59 PM - Post#1685282    

    In response to Spence10

Ah lost me on liter?

 
Spence10 
Cannon
Posts: 6938
05-18-18 06:18 PM - Post#1685295    

    In response to nhmoose

  • nhmoose Said:
Ah lost me on liter?


Sorry. Think quart and you won't be far off.

Spence


 
Colorado Clyde 
Cannon
Posts: 14653
Colorado Clyde
05-18-18 07:48 PM - Post#1685316    

    In response to nhmoose

About 2 ounces more than a quart.. 1.8


 
Spence10 
Cannon
Posts: 6938
05-18-18 07:53 PM - Post#1685317    

    In response to Colorado Clyde

One liter = 1.06 quart.

Spence

 
Colorado Clyde 
Cannon
Posts: 14653
Colorado Clyde
05-18-18 07:59 PM - Post#1685320    

    In response to Spence10

33.814 ounces in a liter
32 in a quart


 
Spence10 
Cannon
Posts: 6938
05-19-18 09:59 AM - Post#1685383    

    In response to Colorado Clyde

Is there anyone here who remembers seeing butter made by churning fresh, raw milk which had been allowed to sour first?

Spence

 
zimmerstutzen 
70 Cal.
Posts: 4859
05-19-18 12:18 PM - Post#1685394    

    In response to Spence10

That's just it. Around here, the cream was skimmed and turned to butter before the milk had a chance to cool. Butter milk had a slightly blueish tinge and was like drinking water. My mother did have a recipe for a sour milk cake which required milk sour to the point of lumpy before use. But there was still no sourness in the finished product.

 
nhmoose 
58 Cal.
Posts: 2147
nhmoose
05-19-18 01:58 PM - Post#1685419    

    In response to Spence10

  • Spence10 Said:
Is there anyone here who remembers seeing butter made by churning fresh, raw milk which had been allowed to sour first?

Spence


That is how my sister made butter from her 2 milk cows. 1 was a Durham the other a Guernsey. This was in the 1970's. The butter was great and then she baked with the milk or fed it to the pigs.

 
sidelock 
50 Cal.
Posts: 1366
05-19-18 09:07 PM - Post#1685474    

    In response to Spence10

YEP, during the BIG WAR.

Edited by sidelock on 05-19-18 09:10 PM. Reason for edit: No reason given.

 
Spence10 
Cannon
Posts: 6938
05-19-18 09:21 PM - Post#1685477    

    In response to sidelock

Sidelock, when milk sours it very soon makes 'clabber'. My memory of Grandmother's buttermilk left from churning butter is of a nice thick, creamy and sour milk, not the thin, blue, bland stuff often described as the milk left after butter is made. The only way that could happen, as I understand it, is if Grandmother's milk had clabbered before she churned it. If I ever knew about that, which I doubt, my 80+ year-old memory is failing me on that point.

Do you know if that is what happened when the old folks let their raw milk sour before making butter from it? Did they churn clabbered milk?

That thin, blue, bland stuff is what you get if you churn fresh milk that has not soured, you get sweet butter and basically whey.

Spence

 
sidelock 
50 Cal.
Posts: 1366
05-20-18 08:47 PM - Post#1685562    

    In response to Spence10

Yes I am sure they did. We had no refrigeration and they let it sit out for some time. You are right, it was much much better than what is available in stores today. I DO NOT feel underprivelaged to have grown up in that time.

 
Spence10 
Cannon
Posts: 6938
05-20-18 09:55 PM - Post#1685574    

    In response to sidelock

  • sidelock Said:
I DO NOT feel underprivelaged to have grown up in that time.


I couldn't agree more. What an experience it was, and what heroes our families were to have provided for us as well as they did in sometimes dire circumstance. My family were like the snake, so poor it didn't have a pit to hiss in, but the memories, the memories, and the life lessons we were taught.

Spence


 
sidelock 
50 Cal.
Posts: 1366
05-21-18 08:26 PM - Post#1685711    

    In response to Spence10

My Wife remembers her mother letting the milk clabber as well. This was happening into the early 1960's.

 
Spence10 
Cannon
Posts: 6938
05-21-18 09:21 PM - Post#1685719    

    In response to sidelock

Thank you, that's good to know.

Spence

 
m-g willy 
40 Cal.
Posts: 226
08-18-18 03:36 PM - Post#1698459    

    In response to Spence10

Never heard of making your own buttermilk before this thread.. So I tried it with the only milk we had in the house whole milk with a mix of 1 part buttermilk with 4 parts whole milk..After 40 hours it was thick and creamy..Chilled it and it is GREAT!..Thanks for the info!

 
 Page 2 of 2 <12
Icon Legend Permissions Topic Options
Print Topic


864 Views
Welcome Guest...
Enter your Login Name and password to login. If you do not have a username you can register one here

Login Name

Password

Remember me. Help



Login Not Working?...

Registered Members
Total: 32076
Todays
Birthdays
8-21curator
8-21Hefner
8-21Teleoceras
Current Quote
"We are never so likely to settle a question rightly as when we discuss it freely."
~ Thomas Babington

PRIVACY POLICY
FusionBB™ Version 3.0 FINAL | ©2003-2010 InteractivePHP, Inc.
Execution time: 0.082 seconds.   Total Queries: 84  
All times are (GMT-5). Current time is 03:53 PM
Top