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Login Name Post: “Prescribed” flints?        (Topic#307161)
Sparkitoff 
36 Cal.
Posts: 90
04-15-18 09:58 PM - Post#1679881    


I purchased a lock from a very common large scale lock maker. When I spoke with them on the phone they recommended I use their prescribed flints for best performance. They sent a few along with the lock and I purchased a few more because the price was very reasonable. These flints happen to be a tan color. I hear a lot about black English Flint. What would make the lock manufacturers recommended flint any different or any better than a different kind?

 
stubshaft 
40 Cal.
Posts: 435
stubshaft
04-15-18 10:34 PM - Post#1679884    

    In response to Sparkitoff

It is possible that the manufacturer wants to insure that you use the most efficient size of flint. They also may be only interested in turning a profit.

 
azmntman 
75 Cal.
Posts: 5505
azmntman
04-15-18 10:43 PM - Post#1679887    

    In response to stubshaft

  • stubshaft Said:
It is possible that the manufacturer wants to insure that you use the most efficient size of flint. They also may be only interested in turning a profit.



Like Honda would recommend you not put an aftermarket hood on the accord and order only OEM. Though the difference is non existent nowadays other than the "made in" label that gets peeled off prior to paint.

 
Stophel 
75 Cal.
Posts: 5314
Stophel
04-15-18 10:44 PM - Post#1679888    

    In response to Sparkitoff

I would guess they are "Blonde French" flints. Some say they are better quality. They are considered harder, and throw hotter sparks, but it is reported that they are hard on frizzens.

The only question is, do they work well in your lock?

 
Spence10 
Cannon
Posts: 6938
04-15-18 11:00 PM - Post#1679890    

    In response to Sparkitoff

What kind of flint are they, knapped or cut/sawed? What color are they?

Spence

 
19 16 6 
40 Cal.
Posts: 387
04-16-18 02:12 AM - Post#1679894    

    In response to Stophel

  • Stophel Said:
but it is reported that they are hard on frizzens.



That being hard on the frizzen is a given, is it not ?
Seeing as how more or bigger & hotter sparks are all pieces of steel frizzen face scraped off by the flint.
Still gotta be a good thing for ignition.
O.


 
Grenadier1758 
58 Cal.
Posts: 2316
Grenadier1758
04-16-18 08:25 AM - Post#1679909    

    In response to Sparkitoff

The lock manufacturer is recommending a prescribed flint based primarily on optimal size for his lock.

There's only subtle differences between black English, French amber, Texas chert, Missouri chert or wherever is the source of the flint. Some may be a bit more brittle and not last as long. Some will require more knapping.

Optimal flints will have two flats for best grip in the jaws and a good tapered bevel. Some will have two good edges so as the first edge wears, you can turn the flint around to bring a sharp edge to face the frizzen.

 
Rifleman1776 
Cannon
Posts: 14554
Rifleman1776
04-16-18 09:57 AM - Post#1679925    

    In response to stubshaft

  • stubshaft Said:
It is possible that the manufacturer wants to insure that you use the most efficient size of flint. They also may be only interested in turning a profit.



Yeppers, both reasons.
If price is competitive with other suppliers, go with it. But this game involves a lot of testing. Shop around and don't be afraid to try English black or (very expensive) German sawed.

 
Pete G 
50 Cal.
Posts: 1054
04-18-18 10:36 AM - Post#1680317    

    In response to Sparkitoff

Although the manufacturer supplies a good flint, others may work equally as well. Rest assured that the flint supplied has proven to work well with the lock. A lock builder would not supply a flint that reflects poorly on their lock.

FWIW French flints have a reputation for being one of the best.

 
White Fox 
40 Cal.
Posts: 414
06-13-18 07:29 PM - Post#1689607    

    In response to Pete G

I've tried many types of "flints", many which were some kind of chert. Even had a dozen made up by a local knapper out of a chunk of "Alibates Flint", a beautiful chert from the Texas Panhandle. Almost too pretty to shoot with.

Have come to like the blond French flints. When I get in a supply of gunflints I sort them into good to go, use for practice and rework piles. Most of the blondes are good to go, with very few having a rocker bottom, pointed top or major slope from side to side.

Flints in the rework pile get worked over with a tile saw to make a platform on the pointy tops, or level out those with major side to side slopes. Found the best way to hold flints for this was to pad jaws of a pair of cheap slip joint pliers with a bit of glued on leather.

 
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