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Login Name Post: just starting out clothing        (Topic#306521)
rusty 
45 Cal.
Posts: 573
rusty
02-09-18 05:25 PM - Post#1668596    


If a person was just starting and wanted to buy some clothing can anyone recommend what clothing and where to get it.ie pants shirt etc.

 
Bo T 
40 Cal.
Posts: 352
02-09-18 08:21 PM - Post#1668634    

    In response to rusty

I picked up a pair of pants from Kootenai River Traders. High quality, excellent fit, good price.

 
tenngun 
Cannon
Posts: 8043
tenngun
02-10-18 12:35 AM - Post#1668668    

    In response to rusty

Pick up your stuff slowly, it’s easy to mismatch. A rifelmans coat fit for the revolutionary war is to late for f&i, and too early for 1812 or the settlement of Texas.
Shirts are less time specific, weskits are only good for about ten years, trousers are iffy, narrow falls cover a long time broad falls not as much. So be careful in your purchases as you don’t want stuff you can’t use later.

Edited by tenngun on 02-10-18 12:36 AM. Reason for edit: No reason given.

 
Black Hand 
Cannon
Posts: 7756
Black Hand
02-10-18 07:56 AM - Post#1668686    

    In response to rusty

X2 for Kootenai River Traders

You'll need a shirt, breeches/trousers, waistcoat, coat, leggings (maybe, depending on your persona), footwear (boots/shoes/moccasins) and some sort of head covering. Mark will keep you on track and provide you with excellent period-correct clothing.

 
tenngun 
Cannon
Posts: 8043
tenngun
02-10-18 04:33 PM - Post#1668776    

    In response to Black Hand

Be sure to check out paintings and importantly cartoons of the time. People in paintings were often set, cartoons often tried to exaggerate often unpleasant aspects of life. However you can get a good idea of the common Joe by combining the two.
A word on moccasins. They are the go to for many living history folks. However moccasin wear out quickly so be prepared to make a lot.
Shoes/ boots on the other hand are hc for any time and last. F you don’t have a good supply of leather you will be making a new pair of moccasins after most every event.

 
Black Hand 
Cannon
Posts: 7756
Black Hand
02-10-18 05:16 PM - Post#1668779    

    In response to tenngun

  • tenngun Said:
...you will be making a new pair of moccasins after most every event.


Maybe if you are walking on blacktop for 8-10 hours a day, 5 days a week. Otherwise, you might need to replace moccasins or soles every couple of years (or more)...

 
Kansas Jake 
54 Cal.
Posts: 1528
02-10-18 09:11 PM - Post#1668805    

    In response to rusty

Determine what era you will be buy clothing for and location. This will have an impact on what is appropriate.

 
tenngun 
Cannon
Posts: 8043
tenngun
02-10-18 10:12 PM - Post#1668819    

    In response to Black Hand

  • Black Hand Said:
  • tenngun Said:
...you will be making a new pair of moccasins after most every event.


Maybe if you are walking on blacktop for 8-10 hours a day, 5 days a week. Otherwise, you might need to replace moccasins or soles every couple of years (or more)...




Maybe the ozarks are tougher on them then your neck of the woods, art of southren plains hard soles I could get a couple of weeks. Sideseams maybe a week in wear. I normally made half a dozen at a time.

 
Grumpa 
58 Cal.
Posts: 2077
02-10-18 11:45 PM - Post#1668822    

    In response to tenngun

My impression is that the most common activity around the campfire was repairing moccasins.

Richard/Grumpa

 
tenngun 
Cannon
Posts: 8043
tenngun
02-11-18 03:30 PM - Post#1668905    

    In response to Grumpa

I know that when I trekked in moccasins I had to carry at least four pair. Wear one all day, put on a new pair at night one to change in to if what I was wearing got too wet. And one to replace the one that would catch a hole. I note that boots and shoes were sent by the pack horse load to rendezvous and aboard the Arabia there were barrels and barrels full of shoes and boots. A new town was often founded around a tavern/ inn/ general store. A blacksmith moved in next and quickly a shoe maker,barrel maker, and tannerie.

 
crockett 
Cannon
Posts: 6351
02-12-18 10:17 AM - Post#1669031    

    In response to rusty

Well since this is in the mountain man section I'll figure you want mountain man clothes. It is a little bit of a big umbrella depending on your persona but as a general rule, I would get a red wool (or wool blend) box shirt that has pc features. Buckskin pantaloons or leggings. The shirt is usually worn over the leggings so they look like pantaloons. If you opt for pantaloons- go with a narrow fall. If you use suspenders- have them cross in back- not the Y type.
The belt is worn over the shirt and is about 1 1/2" wide with a flat center bar buckle, the tongue can be triangular rather than straight.
Make side seam moccasins.
A felt hat of stiff wool- white or black. For a coat- a capote in white with a blanket stripe. The capote styles changed with time and a lot of mountain men made they own so styles varied. On the white capote- when I first got started I figured green ought to be preferred- a sort of camouflage but the fur records clearly show white as the most common. It may be that white looked more like a wolf if the mountain men crawled up to within shooting range of buffalo.
The devil is in the details so as you consider each item- ask more specific questions for that item- might as well get all the details right.

 
tenngun 
Cannon
Posts: 8043
tenngun
02-12-18 10:44 AM - Post#1669035    

    In response to crockett

Crocket is spot on for an hc MM outfit. However.... premade woolen and linen trousers were in the goods taken to rendezvous. Premade capotes also went west in blue blanketing, side seam moccasins are discribed as being made by the boys in the field. Taos and Santa Fe was a sight MM made their way to a time or two. The New Mexican shoe would have been seen there. A two price hard sole moccasins with a shoe like tongue.
Weskits were popular wear at the time with short waist length working mans coats.
Stay away from crude, or big belts and buckle. Knifes went west by the ton. Big antler handled hand forged knifes look great but don’t reflect what was being sold.

 
tenngun 
Cannon
Posts: 8043
tenngun
02-12-18 10:48 AM - Post#1669036    

    In response to tenngun

And one other thing. Fringe looks great. Looking at the paintings long fringe was seen on the trousers. On coats it’s almost compleatly absent or just a little short fringe at the sleeve seam.

 
crockett 
Cannon
Posts: 6351
02-13-18 09:28 AM - Post#1669152    

    In response to tenngun

There is also a diary or two in which the writer mentions long fringe- but as stated, not everything had fringe. Also, the buckskins were worn because that was what was available. Gardner Johnson is on record for buying 2 pairs of wool pants at a post/rendezvous (I forget which).
There were some trappers out of Taos that went up the western slope in Colorado to the Green River Rendezvous around 1829 or so and they got trapped in heavy snows and had to boil down their supply of rawhide moccasin soles for food- the point being that soles were sewn on moccasins. The general opinion was hard soles were introduced from New Mexico and in time spread throughout the area. William Drummond Stewart wrote about stuffing grass, etc. into the bottom of his moccasins in anticipation of running over rocky ground- so soft soled moccasins were in use, maybe universally in the early years.
Wide brimmed hats with low crowns- it is what everyone wears but if you look at the period paintings it seems modest brims and modest crowns (some with a flat top) were also common.

 
tenngun 
Cannon
Posts: 8043
tenngun
02-13-18 10:35 AM - Post#1669173    

    In response to crockett

That’s all true, you can’t go wrong at about any time with moccasins and buckskin trousers or breeches in the east.
Hats you have a big choice. Wool caps, wheel hats, top hats and of corse the slouch hat are all shown in the paintings.
Keep in mind that the avarage MM was an employee of the fur companies. Most didn’t go up for a life time, two or three years at a time was more common. We often think Meek,Bridger, Carson, the avarage was a more short term trapper. Even Smith quit the mountains early in the heyday.

 
crockett 
Cannon
Posts: 6351
02-14-18 09:16 AM - Post#1669321    

    In response to tenngun

Getting back to the original question, not just what clothing but the "Buy" aspect. It's probably fair to say that a lot of clothing has to be home made. I'm not sure where you can buy authentic clothing.

 
Black Hand 
Cannon
Posts: 7756
Black Hand
02-14-18 09:58 AM - Post#1669330    

    In response to crockett

  • crockett Said:
It's probably fair to say that a lot of clothing has to be home made.


No, it doesn't.

  • crockett Said:
I'm not sure where you can buy authentic clothing.


He was give a recommendation. I have seen Mark & Charlotte's clothing first-hand, and it is excellent.



 
tenngun 
Cannon
Posts: 8043
tenngun
02-14-18 04:37 PM - Post#1669407    

    In response to Black Hand

CDJarigans offers trouser shirts hats and smoks from this time that’s historically correct for the time in woolen and linen. They are more for military but trouser are cut for the right time and in correct fabrics that were common. Townsend can set you up with correct working man outfits for the time. People mostly bought clothing off the rack as it were via cottage industry and not from taliors. Known pieces of buckskin clothing tended to be well made.

 
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