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Login Name Post: squirrels        (Topic#306507)
Colorado Clyde 
Cannon
Posts: 14045
Colorado Clyde
02-13-18 12:11 PM - Post#1669191    

    In response to Colorado Clyde

Louis Pasteur , a French chemist and biologist, began closely studying bacteria while investigating the cause of souring in milk and other beverages. This led him to develop the process of pasteurization, where a liquid is boiled and then cooled to kill the bacteria that cause the souring.

This work led Pasteur into a more thorough study of bacteria, enabling him to prove that these microscopic organisms occurred naturally in the environment and did not simply appear spontaneously, as was then generally believed.

As the director of scientific studies at the Ecole Normale in Paris, Pasteur pursued his germ theory, which posited that germs attack the body from the outside. Proved right again, his work led to vaccinations being developed for many germ-borne diseases, including anthrax, tuberculosis, cholera and smallpox. It also led to further work on rabies, which was much more prevalent in Pasteur's time than it is today.

He developed his rabies vaccine by growing the virus in rabbits, then drying the affected nerve tissue to weaken the virus.


On July 6, 1885, the vaccine was administered to Joseph Meister, a 9-year-old boy who had been attacked by a rabid dog. The boy survived and avoided contracting rabies, which would have almost certainly proved fatal.

Good thing it worked: Pasteur was not a licensed physician and could have been prosecuted had the vaccine failed. The legalities were forgotten and Pasteur instead became a national hero.


 
satx78247 
Cannon
Posts: 6027
02-13-18 12:44 PM - Post#1669207    

    In response to Colorado Clyde

The so-called "furious form" & the so-called "dumb form" (sometimes called, "silent rabies") of rabies sare caused by at least THREE similar viruses: Lyssavirus, Ephemovirus & Vesiculovirus.
(There is also a similar virus, that seems to only affect bats in Australia/NZ, that MAY be yet another form of the rabies-causing virus.)

All of the known similar viruses that cause rabies are members of the non-segmented, negative-stranded genomes & are members of the "bullet-shaped" group of viruses called: Rhabdoviridae.

NOTE: Once the patient starts exhibiting symptoms of the disease, it is almost always fatal = There a a total of SIX known patients, who have survived the actual disease. All of those patients were treated using "The Milwaukee Protocol".

yours, satx


 
Colorado Clyde 
Cannon
Posts: 14045
Colorado Clyde
02-13-18 01:25 PM - Post#1669223    

    In response to satx78247

  • satx78247 Said:
The so-called "furious form" & the so-called "dumb form" (sometimes called, "silent rabies") of rabies sare caused by at least THREE similar viruses: Lyssavirus, Ephemovirus & Vesiculovirus.
(There is also a similar virus, that seems to only affect bats in Australia/NZ, that MAY be yet another form of the rabies-causing virus.)

All of the known similar viruses that cause rabies are members of the non-segmented, negative-stranded genomes & are members of the "bullet-shaped" group of viruses called: Rhabdoviridae.

NOTE: Once the patient starts exhibiting symptoms of the disease, it is almost always fatal = There a a total of SIX known patients, who have survived the actual disease. All of those patients were treated using "The Milwaukee Protocol".

yours, satx



Yes I gathered most of that from the CDC too, but, which genus where you referring to?

  • Quote:
Fwiw, there is a "form" of rabies that doesn't exhibit "the usual appearance" of rabies.



Are the symptoms different or are you talking about a latency period?

Also, is this "form" found in the USA?

Has it been detected in raccoons or squirrels?


 
satx78247 
Cannon
Posts: 6027
02-13-18 03:36 PM - Post#1669252    

    In response to Colorado Clyde

YES, the symptoms of the two forms are very different. = Until the victim is bitten or scratched, the carrier of "the dumb form" may exhibit few or NO obvious symptoms, other than a "certain unsteadiness, shortly before death occurs" upon their feet/paws.
(4 of the 6 survivors of the disease were infected by mammals that had the "dumb or silent form". - In one of those cases, the infection likely occurred from the saliva, urine or feces of an infected bat, with "actual contact with those substances" in a cave more than a year before the symptoms manifested themselves. - The 6th patient MAY have contracted his illness from "hand to mouth contact" with saliva of an "unknown source".)

As to latency period, the USDA GUIDE TO DISEASES OF LIVESTOCK FOR FARMERS, RANCHERS & STOCKMEN that I consulted, the obvious symptoms (IF ANY) of the disease may appear in as little as 5 days up to more than 2 years.
(The book says that the exact progression from infection is "variable" & "possibly unknowable".)

Both the "furious" & "dumb" forms MAY occur in "household pets, wildlife & domestic livestock", Worldwide.
(The book does not say raccoons or squirrels, specifically.)

As to genus, I had to go dig out one of my DoD PAMs from USAREUR Vector Control School. - The genus of all the KNOWN viruses is: Lyssavirae.
(The USAREUR 10th MedLab/MEDDAC-PAM indicates that it is POSSIBLE that there may be other tropical viruses that can cause rabies or "a similar & equally deadly disease", that are "are believed to have been contracted" from exposure to the body fluids of reptiles, birds & insects, as well as mammals.)

Fwiw, I'm neither a health professional nor a scientist, so I consulted the few sources that I had at hand.

yours, satx


Edited by satx78247 on 02-13-18 03:48 PM. Reason for edit: typos

 
Colorado Clyde 
Cannon
Posts: 14045
Colorado Clyde
02-13-18 03:45 PM - Post#1669254    

    In response to satx78247

Thanks, no further questions.

I think we both agree, shoot first and diagnose later.



Edited by Colorado Clyde on 02-13-18 03:48 PM. Reason for edit: No reason given.

 
Kansas Jake 
50 Cal.
Posts: 1383
02-13-18 05:43 PM - Post#1669272    

    In response to Colorado Clyde

Rabies is very scary, that is why we keep the dog and cat up to date on their vaccinations. No point in taking a chance. Our cat is strictly a house cat, but that doesn't mean a mouse or other vermin couldn't get into the house and expose her.

 
satx78247 
Cannon
Posts: 6027
02-13-18 08:55 PM - Post#1669294    

    In response to Kansas Jake

100& CORRECT. = The "silent form", that can even be spread by body fluids left on surfaces, is especially scary to me.
(Fwiw, I'm a TX Master Naturalist & I'm considering getting the vaccine against rabies, as all TMN "come in close contact with" various wildlife. - Remember, you need NOT be BITTEN to be exposed to the deadly virus.)

yours, satx


 
sidelock 
50 Cal.
Posts: 1363
02-13-18 09:00 PM - Post#1669298    

    In response to Kansas Jake

Did this topic drift away?

 
satx78247 
Cannon
Posts: 6027
02-13-18 10:17 PM - Post#1669303    

    In response to sidelock

Topic drift? NOPE.

Instead the thread took an entirely different direction (after an important question was asked,) once the original topic seems to have been exhausted.

yours, satx


 
Colorado Clyde 
Cannon
Posts: 14045
Colorado Clyde
02-13-18 10:33 PM - Post#1669304    

    In response to satx78247

The rabies virus doesn't survive long below 70 degrees....So don't eat your squirrels raw.


 
satx78247 
Cannon
Posts: 6027
02-13-18 11:43 PM - Post#1669309    

    In response to Colorado Clyde

I think that I can easily comply with that advice.
(CHUCKLE)

yours, satx


 
Rifleman1776 
Cannon
Posts: 14194
Rifleman1776
02-14-18 10:14 AM - Post#1669333    

    In response to satx78247

  • Quote:
Both the "furious" & "dumb" forms MAY occur in "household pets, wildlife & domestic livestock", Worldwide.
(The book does not say raccoons or squirrels, specifically.)




Raccoons are a common carrier of rabies. And, cattle are often victims of transmission from raccoons. This is because cattle are curious creatures. If they see a weakened raccoon they will investigate and, unfortunately, often get bitten and catching the disease. When I had cattle my rule was anytime I saw a raccoon or skunk in the daytime I shot it and removed wearing rubber gloves.

 
satx78247 
Cannon
Posts: 6027
02-14-18 10:41 AM - Post#1669336    

    In response to Rifleman1776

GOOD PLAN, imVho.

Also, grazing/licking on ground/plants that an infected animal has left bodily fluids upon MAY expose the livestock/persons to the virus.

"Passive transmission", as well as the danger of being bitten/scratched, is why numerous TX Master Naturalists are considering getting vaccinated against rabies, as we sometimes handle wildlife.
(For example, our Small Mammal Surveys require TMN to trap, weigh, measure, computer chip, record & release the native mammals back into the environment.)

Note: During these surveys, the invasive species are removed from the capture area.

yours, satx


 
Loyalist Dave 
Cannon
Posts: 6488
Loyalist Dave
02-14-18 01:51 PM - Post#1669380    

    In response to satx78247

We had a rabid canine in a public park area in the 1990's, and what folks forgot was that although nobody had been bitten, the dog's paws were raw and he licked them heavily. Then when he appeared at a daycare center, although he didn't bite a child, he did scratch the child as the child escaped through a door that closed behind him....

..., I showed up and the dog brought his fangs to a gunfight..., which was impressive since it took 11 body hits from a 9mm to put him down (he was moving the entire time) and the last three rounds I concentrated on his hips which broke. Rabies can really "juice up" an animal and they can take a lot of damage.

The family almost didn't take the kid to see the doctor since he hadn't been "bitten". I spotted the dog's cracked and bleeding paws, and animal control officers then convinced the family to immediately take the kid to a doctor. It was sorta close, but the kid made it.

LD

 
satx78247 
Cannon
Posts: 6027
02-14-18 02:09 PM - Post#1669386    

    In response to Loyalist Dave

GOOD. - Fresh saliva is a KNOWN hazard, when it comes to rabies transmission.

yours, satx


 
satx78247 
Cannon
Posts: 6027
02-14-18 10:52 PM - Post#1669461    

    In response to Loyalist Dave

I heard this afternoon that a TMN was recently scratched, while trying to "chip" a 200 gram native cotton rat. The email indicates that there was no obvious break in the skin.

And anyone wonders why some of us are considering getting vaccinated against the virus??

yours, satx


 
nhmoose 
54 Cal.
Posts: 1903
nhmoose
02-15-18 03:12 PM - Post#1669574    

    In response to satx78247

My son and I as animal control operators {NH State Term} got the vaccination.

 
satx78247 
Cannon
Posts: 6027
02-15-18 05:49 PM - Post#1669588    

    In response to nhmoose

The two of you are WISE in my opinion.

yours, satx


 
Loyalist Dave 
Cannon
Posts: 6488
Loyalist Dave
02-16-18 07:21 AM - Post#1669678    

    In response to nhmoose

How reliable is the formation of a titer? I had several Hep vaccinations, and never developed one for that.

LD

 
Black Hand 
Cannon
Posts: 7048
02-16-18 08:02 AM - Post#1669681    

    In response to Loyalist Dave

  • Loyalist Dave Said:
How reliable is the formation of a titer? I had several Hep vaccinations, and never developed one for that.

LD


It tells you your level of responsiveness to antigen challenge. The higher the titer, the better the response...

 
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