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Copperhead 65 
32 Cal.
Posts: 43
Copperhead 65
11-14-17 05:03 PM - Post#1651737    


Several years ago I read a historical novel about the F&I war. I can't remember the title or author. There was a chart in the book that listed how the native Americans labeled scalps taken. Different colors and markings on leather attached to the scalp. Examples would be a certain marking would be for a farmer, another for an enemy killed in battle.... Probably not historically accurate but interesting. Does anyone know the book I'm looking for? Thanks

 
Wes/Tex 
Cannon
Posts: 7448
Wes/Tex
11-14-17 08:53 PM - Post#1651787    

    In response to Copperhead 65

I'd like to know too, I've never read or even heard of a chart like this.


 
simonbeans 
36 Cal.
Posts: 55
simonbeans
11-14-17 10:14 PM - Post#1651801    

    In response to Copperhead 65

In Allan Eckert's THAT DARK AND BLOODY RIVER: CHRONICLES OF THE OHIO RIVER VALEY is quoted a letter to Frederick Haldimand, British Governor of Canada from apparently Col. Guy Johnson, British superintendent of Indian affairs and nephew of Sir William Johnson. It was dated January 3rd, 1782 and describes "eight packages of scalps, cured, dried, hooped and painted with the Indian triumphal marks". An example is that in No.1, that "the inside of the skin painted red, with a small black spot to note their being killed by bullets." "Also, 62 of farmers killed in their homes; the hoops painted red, the skin painted brown, and marked with a hoe, a dark circle all around indicate their being surprised at night, and a black hatchet in the middle, signifying their being killed with that weapon."
The other 7 packages are described in similar detail of the symbolism for the scalps.

 
Copperhead 65 
32 Cal.
Posts: 43
Copperhead 65
11-15-17 12:38 AM - Post#1651813    

    In response to simonbeans

That's not the book I read but exactly how the scalps are labeled. Each scalp was marked as what type of person and what they were doing when killed. Thank you sir.

 
Flint62Smoothie 
50 Cal.
Posts: 1230
Flint62Smoothie
11-15-17 08:35 AM - Post#1651843    

    In response to Copperhead 65

Holy cow ... never knew that!


 
necchi 
Cannon
Posts: 11627
necchi
11-20-17 05:05 PM - Post#1652592    

    In response to simonbeans

  • simonbeans Said:
In Allan Eckert's THAT DARK AND BLOODY RIVER: CHRONICLES OF THE OHIO RIVER VALEY


Your quoted statement was actually made in Allen Eckerts Historical Fiction novel "Sorrow in Our Heart, The Life of Tecumseh" on page 284.
It is fiction,, written by an "agent",, a fictional character of the novel.
https://books.google.com/books?id=5fo_jbEl6AIC&pg=PA284&...
JohnT
Molon Labe~


 
wattlebuster 
69 Cal.
Posts: 3499
wattlebuster
11-23-17 04:54 AM - Post#1653017    

    In response to Copperhead 65

Darn Now I've got to order another book
Nothing beats the feel of a handmade southern iron mounted flintlock on a fine frosty morning


 
simonbeans 
36 Cal.
Posts: 55
simonbeans
11-23-17 09:25 AM - Post#1653059    

    In response to necchi

I don't think it is fiction. Although many of Eckert's books are historical "narratives", the DARK AND BLOODY RIVER is more of a chronological study of the Ohio River. He has extensive footnotes of research for his novels. That quote was in a couple of his novels and I have seen it elsewhere. Eckert acknowledges that the author is a conclusion based on location, time frame and circumstances.

 
Grumpa 
54 Cal.
Posts: 1912
11-23-17 11:17 PM - Post#1653209    

    In response to necchi

The chart appears in more than one of Eckert's books, including That Dark and Bloody River. He refers to his books as "historic narratives".

Whether the account is historically accurate or a bit of anti-British propaganda from the time is not something we can readily determine at this date. But, the fact is that the British did pay the "Indians" for scalps taken from Colonial rebels, and the Americans paid for scalps taken from their "Indian" adversaries.

Ranger Captain Samuel Brady, operating out of Fort Pitt, was paid for scalps taken by his men during the rescue of captives from "Indian" raiding parties. The money received for these scalps (and weapons etc. taken from men who had no further use of them) was routinely given by him to the survivors, or the families of those who did not survive. These were brutal times. Atrocities were committed by all sides.

Whether the above inventory of scalps was a true account or not, the fact that it was widely accepted across the frontier indicates the tenor of the times.

Richard/Grumpa

 
necchi 
Cannon
Posts: 11627
necchi
11-24-17 01:11 PM - Post#1653276    

    In response to Grumpa

Oh yes your right, there sadly was trade and profit made in scalps and as you point out scalps from both sides.

I also enjoy Historical Fiction,, when an author writes in that designation it brings the fun of actual historical figures and events in a place or time but also lends the author license to create or add his own fictional characters/events to the story line.
I could be wrong, but seein's how this is the first time I've heard of marks on scalps to designate the victim or where they came from,, I tend to believe it's more artistic expression then something that was common practice.
JohnT
Molon Labe~


 
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