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Nomad Expedition 
32 Cal.
Posts: 16
11-08-17 03:56 PM - Post#1650887    


I like the old ways and like reading about them and adventures that other have.

I also like using a haversack over a backpack I did have to get another 1 liter container for water so I now have to 1 liter just was not enough for me for each days trek from water source to source.
I would love to find out how much water they took with them way back or were they just not that worried about being hydrated like people are now.
Yes they were a tough breed back then but they grew up with that then too dident they...

Bill

Edited by Claude on 11-08-17 05:01 PM. Reason for edit: Removed reference to modern firearms

 
Wes/Tex 
Cannon
Posts: 7787
Wes/Tex
11-08-17 05:16 PM - Post#1650907    

    In response to Nomad Expedition

Claude is correct, this is a traditional site when it comes to muzzle loading firearms. But hang around long enough and we'll convince you that percussion and flintlock is the only way. Before you know it you'll be in the woods with a fire pole, wearing dead animal skins and calling everyone 'Pilgrim"...it's an addiction. Welcome to the menagerie!

 
Grumpa 
54 Cal.
Posts: 1980
11-08-17 06:29 PM - Post#1650923    

    In response to Nomad Expedition

Welcome to the Forum!

We look forward to learning from your trekking experience. Like WesTex says, you will find it a lot more enjoyable with a traditional muzzleloader.

Richard/Grumpa

 
Stumpkiller 
Moderator
Posts: 17315
Stumpkiller
11-11-17 08:42 PM - Post#1651362    

    In response to Grumpa

How much water?

Surviving "cheesebox" canteens from the Revolutionary War hold about a quart or a little more.

Longhunters? Probably made do with what they could collect from streams and maybe similar to get between then to refill.

Not recommended with current populations and infestations of amoebas and E.coli.

Carry as much as you need. Or boil what you find.
"Don't take life too serious - it ain't nohow permanent."


 
Black Hand 
Cannon
Posts: 6749
11-12-17 08:55 AM - Post#1651398    

    In response to Nomad Expedition

  • Nomad Expedition Said:

I would love to find out how much water they took with them way back or were they just not that worried about being hydrated like people are now.



By all I've read, they drank from available water sources and rarely carried water with them. Do yourself a favor and make a minor concession as many of us do - put a good quality water filter in your pack and use it.


 
Loyalist Dave 
Cannon
Posts: 6227
Loyalist Dave
11-13-17 05:00 PM - Post#1651583    

    In response to Black Hand

Yep, something like a Life Straw in case you can't take the time to boil water in the trade kettle is mighty prudent thing to have. Some folks go a step further with a Micro Filter that will grab some of the chemicals too. The nice thing about the second option is that you can draw water for a whole trekking group with that thing, so only one needed for the group, and everybody else carries a Life Straw as backup.

LD


 
tenngun 
Cannon
Posts: 6821
tenngun
11-13-17 05:33 PM - Post#1651590    

    In response to Loyalist Dave

The Hessian rum ration canteen offered by a few dealers holds about half a gallon.
I carry a couple of wool covered d or kidney shaped canteens and water pills. Fill both from a clean source, refill the first when empty and add the pill. I have lean water by the time the second is full. I keep a couple of one qt mind ren water bottles hidden in my snap sack to be used in emergency. East of the Great Plains there are few places where a couple hours in the woods won’t find a water source.

 
NWTF Longhunter 
50 Cal.
Posts: 1150
NWTF Longhunter
11-28-17 11:12 PM - Post#1654157    

    In response to tenngun

Back in the day you could drink from any running stream. There's still places where you can do that. Back in the 80's a pard and I went on a 100 mile float trip in remote Alaska to hunt moose. I had a tin cup on a string that I dipped in the river when I needed a drink. Near the end of the trek when we were in the main river near civilization we couldn't drink from the river without boiling the water.

 
jrmflintlock 
45 Cal.
Posts: 611
jrmflintlock
11-30-17 02:41 PM - Post#1654438    

    In response to NWTF Longhunter

Those places are far and few between. even in some of the most remote areas there have been livestock and people. Many of the water pathogens are living things that nature does not filter.

A good friend of mine was a Smokejumper and was in one of the wilderness areas in Montana on a fire. Nearest accessible hiking trial was 10 miles away. He drank from a cold clear spring about 5 ft from the source and now suffers from fused vertebrae in his neck. The bug that got him would have been filtered by any quality filter or killed if boiled but he figured he was in remote enough country drinking close to the source. Just cause water is coming out of the ground does not make it safe to drink.

He was very sick for a long time, almost died. Tough as nails he is! Still works as a Forester. But he can not turn his head or look up or down.

Just sharing what I know. I do not recall the name of the bug, but it was Identified. So it was not just "Oh I think this is what caused it".



 
nhmoose 
54 Cal.
Posts: 1780
nhmoose
11-30-17 04:45 PM - Post#1654459    

    In response to jrmflintlock

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giardia

First found 1681 , drink all you want I will filter or boil.

Reenacting is great fun but still play. Life is real. You cannot truly go back, play but be careful. Family counts to most of us.

 
tenngun 
Cannon
Posts: 6821
tenngun
12-01-17 07:40 PM - Post#1654666    

    In response to nhmoose

I doubt water was any safer in the old days. Beer was the fall back drink because water was deadly. Dysentery killed a lot of frontiersman. I trekked from grand junction to ft Bridget in ‘78drinking from streams without issue. Two days after getting to the fort I came up with chief Joseph revenge
Drank from a lot of springs here in the ozarks, got sick once, used pills ever since. Only takes one deer to spoil a stream for days.

 
tenngun 
Cannon
Posts: 6821
tenngun
12-01-17 07:40 PM - Post#1654667    

    In response to nhmoose

poted twice

Edited by tenngun on 12-01-17 07:41 PM. Reason for edit: No reason given.

 
Black Hand 
Cannon
Posts: 6749
12-01-17 09:28 PM - Post#1654684    

    In response to tenngun

  • tenngun Said:
I doubt water was any safer in the old days. Beer was the fall back drink because water was deadly. Dysentery killed a lot of frontiersman. I trekked from grand junction to ft Bridget in ‘78drinking from streams without issue. Two days after getting to the fort I came up with chief Joseph revenge
Drank from a lot of springs here in the ozarks, got sick once, used pills ever since. Only takes one deer to spoil a stream for days.


The incubation period for Giardiasis to manifest is up to 2 weeks...


 
tenngun 
Cannon
Posts: 6821
tenngun
12-01-17 11:22 PM - Post#1654699    

    In response to Black Hand

Well I could have got it well before on the trek. The point I was making was that I drank without ill effect often. In the Rockies and the ozarks.
Dysentery was a common cause of death on the frontier. They didn’t know about germs back then. They did know swamps and low lands caused malaria. They kewwater was ofte unsafe and avoided it when possible. They had some wrong ideas on the cause but they saw the effect. People drank from creeks people pooped them self to death.
I think we create myth about how pure the earth was before the industrial revolution. It was even pointed out in the 1860s that the Chinese railroad builders drank boiled tea and stayed healthier then European railroad builders who drank water.

 
Ames 
45 Cal.
Posts: 566
Ames
12-23-17 07:42 AM - Post#1658518    

    In response to tenngun

I'd just like to point out that the most remote, pristine, ice clear stream that you may have been drinking from for years is only as clean, on any given day, as the dead deer laying in it 50 yards upstream that you never saw.
True 400 years ago as it is right now. Think before you drink it.

 
Nomad Expedition 
32 Cal.
Posts: 16
12-31-17 02:38 AM - Post#1660171    

    In response to Ames

already lots of interesting posts.
I would have liked to get into flintlocks a while back but the locals here are not in any way newbie friendly their loss...
Yes I carry a water filter around with me but mostly boil my water when in/making camp and filter if I need water when on the move. Water quality is pretty good in the province of BC just some journeys take a long day or two till one gets to a water source. Must have been hell for them that traveled desert areas but I am sure you get used to lack of water or find ways to carry more of the wet stuff with you.
I am an avid reloader and cast my own boolits and lots of swan shot for my 30-06/12ga combination rifle love the thing and wont change now for any reason I even make my own 12 ga brass shotshells for it as well.
I assume trapping and foraging for plants was also done on these trips to procure food?

 
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