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Login Name Post: baker lean toooo        (Topic#305010)
satx78247 
Cannon
Posts: 6184
09-17-17 09:58 PM - Post#1644590    

    In response to pondoro

Fwiw, I have done it alone BUT it's NOT something that I'd care to repeat.

yours, satx


 
beavertrapper 
40 Cal.
Posts: 198
beavertrapper
09-18-17 02:54 PM - Post#1644644    

    In response to pondoro

ya, agreed once its up right it will be nice just very cumbersome.


BT

 
satx78247 
Cannon
Posts: 6184
09-18-17 08:32 PM - Post#1644681    

    In response to beavertrapper

YEP.

yours,satx


 
Nomad Expedition 
32 Cal.
Posts: 16
01-09-18 11:52 PM - Post#1662460    

    In response to satx78247

I like the look of the baker tent but sounds like it is a difficult tent to setup so what tents would be better for setting up?

 
satx78247 
Cannon
Posts: 6184
01-10-18 12:01 AM - Post#1662461    

    In response to Nomad Expedition

ImVho, as I used to live in a Baker every Summer, when I was a BSA Camp Program Director, Waterfront Director & (previous to those 2 jobs) a SM of my own troop.
(My "Summer Place" had a twin bed w/mosquito nets, folding domino table, porta-potty, book shelf/paperbacks, full-size picnic table. HUGE ice chest & 12V lights.)

The Baker is a LONG-TERM "residence" (imo) & utterly UNSUITABLE for overnight/weekend camping.

yours, satx


 
satx78247 
Cannon
Posts: 6184
01-10-18 12:24 AM - Post#1662465    

    In response to Nomad Expedition

For overnight or a couple of nights out, I like a "plain Jane" water-proofed painter's tarp OR the FORESTRER, as each sets up fast & is pretty much weather-proof even in a BAD rain/snow storm IF staked/guyed solidly/securely.

yours, satx


 
Loyalist Dave 
Cannon
Posts: 6784
Loyalist Dave
01-10-18 07:48 AM - Post#1662496    

    In response to Nomad Expedition

  • Quote:
I like the look of the baker tent but sounds like it is a difficult tent to setup so what tents would be better for setting up?



IF you just want a canvas tent, and are not stuck with event requirements, a Pyramid tent, sometimes called a Miner's tent, or a Hunter's Tent, or a variation on the pyramid called a Canoe Tent, or another variation called a George Tent are good. They all use a single pole for the most basic configurations.

I think the best variation on the Pyramid is something called a Royce Tent. You'd have to contact Tentsmiths or another maker to have it made for you, and it's pretty much an elongated Pyramid with the door in the side. You can find it on page 86 of volume one of Camping and Woodcraft. The Pyramid tent benefits from using two poles, as do the variations, for this gives you maximum interior room, and is still easy to set up.

Another variation is the single pole, conical tent, from the 19th century.


A Diamond Shelter is pretty versatile, and often needs but a single pole..., and they meet requirements at events. If you get one made from oil cloth, and are careful to make your fire at a distance they are light too. This is probably the most versatile shelter out there. Alone, or combined with another persons diamond shelter, they can be configured in many ways. Not only as a shelter for you, but also they work as a makeshift fly, and also sometimes are used to cover equipment and wood, when used with another type of tent. THIS would be the best possible recommendation, but you will need to get it and experiment with it to find what works best for you.

The wedge tent needs three poles, and is also pretty easy to set up, and is good for events with restrictions. It's the most complicated to set up of the above recommended tents.



LD



 
Colorado Clyde 
Cannon
Posts: 14653
Colorado Clyde
01-10-18 10:20 AM - Post#1662516    

    In response to Nomad Expedition

  • Nomad Expedition Said:
I like the look of the baker tent but sounds like it is a difficult tent to setup so what tents would be better for setting up?



Off the top of my head, The three most difficult tents to set up are; The Tee-pee, The baker, and the Marquee....The reasons being, the amount of canvas you have to handle and the number and length of poles.

A tent can be a pricey investment. I suggest showing up at an event on set-up day and helping people set-up....This will help you decide what you want..

P.S. I owned a Baker tent for years.....It was nice, but I would not buy another.


Edited by Colorado Clyde on 01-10-18 10:23 AM. Reason for edit: No reason given.

 
satx78247 
Cannon
Posts: 6184
01-10-18 11:35 AM - Post#1662540    

    In response to Colorado Clyde

AGREED 100%. = I once saw a fellow, who set up a full-size teepee by himself & quickly decided that I didn't want a teepee.
(He had the numerous poles "roped on top of" a long-wheelbase F350 Ford van & was pulling a trailer with the teepee's canvas/ropes/pulley arrangement/other gear, inside.)

yours, satx


 
Colorado Clyde 
Cannon
Posts: 14653
Colorado Clyde
01-10-18 04:52 PM - Post#1662601    

    In response to satx78247

  • satx78247 Said:
AGREED 100%.

yours, satx



I like when we agree...

But, I'm glad that everyone at a rendezvous doesn't share my opinion....It would be very boring if everyone had the same tent...And confusing at night.


 
satx78247 
Cannon
Posts: 6184
01-10-18 04:58 PM - Post#1662604    

    In response to Colorado Clyde

100% TRUE.

yours, satx


 
Coot 
69 Cal.
Posts: 3119
01-10-18 05:54 PM - Post#1662624    

    In response to Colorado Clyde

When we were campers, Mrs Coot & I had a big wedge & never had any issues with set up or living with storms. Easy to erect & to take down and acceptable at any event. Once we became vendors, we switched to a square marque (one center pole & no ridge pole). The marque is not difficult to set up - I can do it by myself if necessary, BUT it is time consuming to set up with a pile of stakes & a forest of wall poles - sort of a wood & canvas erector set. I suggest that prior to a major purchase, to talk to as many owners as possible about what they like, don't like or would do differently as far as their tent goes.

 
Mad Irish Jack ODonnell 
40 Cal.
Posts: 483
Mad Irish Jack ODonnell
02-06-18 05:46 PM - Post#1668060    

    In response to beavertrapper

Below's a pic of the Baker I had when I had the family or friends in tow. Made by Panther Primitives in WV with customized add ons.
8'X11.5' with 3' back wall and 7'front height. The left side had a 9' flap and the right had a 6' flap. And it had a 8" sod cloth around. The attached front awning flap was 11.5'X7'. I also had a 11.5'X7' removable privacy curtain which I could use as a trail tarp. I had an extra tarp for a floor.
I had two 7.5' front and two rear 3.5' corner poles with 'Y's at the top to support the weight. I use a hand sledge to make holes on the ground for their stability. I did that when it was basically up. I didn't dig.
I had 6-12' cross poles and three main supports about 15' long (I liked the look of the longer poles sticking over the front). I laid the canvas, top up, where I was going to live. Put 1 pole each across the back and the front (Side to side), Then three 15 footers one in the center, the others on each side, back to front. The other four side to side, between the front and back supports. Tie them all together snug. I had two 13' side flap poles and a 13' front flap pole, tie them to the flap (Sides first,with the thicker ends forward to set on the ground if closing awning down to close tent; Then front on top) with the extra lengths overlap the Top brace resting toward back. Then I had two flap raising poles that raised the flap up to cool and down for night or rain runoff. I had 2 front and 2 back corner adjustable guide ropes that had a loop(10") in the middle and long enough, and some to tighten, to go at 90 degrees to support the tent.
I had access to property where I was permitted to take Poplar trees that were for my poles. I'd carefully select them for straightness and cut (sawing is better) down 5 or 6 at a time. Let them set in the warm sun for 30-45 minute while cutting 5-6 more. Then using a utility knife, cut the bark lengthwise. Then peel it off. It should peel like a banana. Do this until you have all the poles you need. It's best to store them flat (maybe on 6 (2X4s 3-4 ft long. Let the sap leak out & the poles will dry and be so light you won't think they can support anything. Break a toothpick, easy. Grab a bundle of toothpicks and try to break that, It's how these poplar polls work. Do NOT put a finish on the poles. The rain will soak and then drain out the low ends. I used sugar maple for the corner Y poles. You should be able to assemble and set the back wall and poles before needing some for a short time to help with the front corners. After a year I added a wood burner stove for cold weather. The pic was in late Sept. I mostly used the baker for 4 or more days camping. I used the wedge on the right in the pic or a trail tarp for one night and short weekends. If you have questions, send a PM

The extra high pole on the left front corner is my flag pole. My wedge on the right is for equipment storage etc.




 
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