Muzzleloading Forum .....


Contact - Can't Login?
 Page 2 of 2 <12
Login Name Post: Hudson Bay blanket        (Topic#303911)
Kansas Jake 
54 Cal.
Posts: 1531
01-28-18 07:46 PM - Post#1666376    

    In response to Colorado Clyde

She really doesn't want it, but just wants to pull my chain.

 
Stophel 
75 Cal.
Posts: 5314
Stophel
03-12-18 08:39 PM - Post#1674027    

    In response to Kansas Jake

I'm a wool blanket freak. I just the other day received two I recently ordered! I only have one Hudson's Bay blanket that I got on ebay for 50 bucks a couple of months ago. It's a 4 point, but I'm not sure it's still its original size. "Tan with brown stripe", with "tan" meaning more like "orange sherbet color" I like it anyway. Honestly, while it is a decent blanket, it is not exactly magical, and not nearly as impressive as I had long been lead to believe they were supposed to be. Twill wove and a bit tighter than the average blanket, but not any thicker or much heavier.

Among my many others, my most impressive blanket is an OD green Dutch military AaBe brand that I got many years ago (before the wool blanket craze really started to sweep the land) and it is THICK, and DENSE, and HEAVY, with nothing else I have even coming close, except for a dark gray German military blanket, which is nearly as thick and dense, and a brown-gray "French" blanket (so it was marketed as), which rates just behind the German one, and which I also am about to make a blanket capote out of.

I'm always on the lookout for 18th century-ish looking wool blankets (which are out there, but not super easy to find). At this point in my life, "close enough" is close enough, and I have a few that are close enough.

Ebay is chock full of vintage wool blankets. Unfortunately (for me, anyway), most of them are from the 50's, so they are all pastel colors like sea foam green, dusty rose, sky blue, and sunny yellow...

"Bushcrafters" have pretty much wiped out the surplus and "camo color" blanket supply, and even plain white is getting harder to come across.



 
Rifleman1776 
Cannon
Posts: 14827
Rifleman1776
03-13-18 10:27 AM - Post#1674095    

    In response to Stophel

I have several wool blankets and garments made from them. When I first started this game and wanted a capote I was given the advise to buy a Whitney. Was told just as good as a HB but much less expensive. I bought two. Big misteak. While nice blankets they do not provide anywhere near the warmth of a HB. Wind goes right through the Whitney. Might as well be standing nekkid on a cold windy day. I have a couple plaid and a white, all no-name, I use for bedding. And two garments made from lighter weight no-name. Wood is great but there is no match for a real HB.

 
Dutch Schoultz 
50 Cal.
Posts: 1141
03-15-18 08:01 AM - Post#1674383    

    In response to Stophel

Your post about blankets etc got me thinking about the gear the Army gave us to keep warm in Korea during the awkwardness over there. All kinds of garments, none of which did much against the Siberian weather Korea enjoys..
The great break through came when the Chinese handed our posteriors to us in the great retreat from the northern border when thousands of them appeared wearing the great padded coats thatmmade them look like mIchelin men and which I noticed on all sorts of people yesterday while at the local Walmart.
Lots of people, even young ladies wearing coats and jackets the marines would have killed for during that great retreat.

Dutch

 
Stophel 
75 Cal.
Posts: 5314
Stophel
03-15-18 06:50 PM - Post#1674484    

    In response to Dutch Schoultz

We, of course, tend to want the thickest, fullest, tightest blanket possible. And we can literally search the globe to find it with only a few mouse clicks. I'm sure they would have liked that too 200+ years ago, but my own belief is that they were pretty limited in the quality of blankets available. We demand impenetrable armor against the cold... they were happy to get whatever they could get.

From what I have seen, the average 18th century blanket was little different from the average (or even poor) 20th century blanket. Perhaps somewhat coarse, not really all that fulled, not really all that fluffy, not really all that dense. Granted, the existing old blankets may have lost some of their nap and fullness, but take a look at these and you'll see they're definitely not broadcloth (which WAS heavily fulled and dense). Some of these don't look too terribly bad, but some look downright flimsy. My impression (right or wrong?) is that the Dutch blankets may have been considered generally superior.

https://www.scribd.com/document/288097548/Bedding-Blankets



 
tenngun 
Cannon
Posts: 8045
tenngun
03-17-18 11:12 PM - Post#1674861    

    In response to Stophel

In southren Antarctic reaches of South America the natives were filmed in cold conditions with little clothing on. We live in warm world where it’s ‘ room temp’ all the time. So we want and need a warmer clothing. They lived in a unheated world, and because of that what we would think of as thin or at least not that thick and heavy.
That said it is interesting to note the word naked. Today we mostly use naked to mean nude. American and Canadians are often described as near naked. It’s not to say they were running around nude but they didn’t have what Europeans considered enough clothing. Shoes( not moccasins) stockings breeches shirt weskit coat overcoat or great coat gloves and hats were considered the norm. Less then that was naked or near naked as naked means defenseless against the cold. The blanketing we might consider to light to make a capote or great coat from might be seen with joy back then.

 
BillinOregon 
Cannon
Posts: 6548
03-18-18 08:08 AM - Post#1674898    

    In response to tenngun

Stophel, you have such a gift for finding images. Curious what pattern you plan to use to fashion your capote.

 
Stophel 
75 Cal.
Posts: 5314
Stophel
03-18-18 04:03 PM - Post#1674975    

    In response to BillinOregon

Since nothing fits me, I have to come up with my own pattern to work on me.

 
BillinOregon 
Cannon
Posts: 6548
03-18-18 05:59 PM - Post#1674990    

    In response to Stophel

Well, be sure to share images when you have completed your project -- please!



 
Rifleman1776 
Cannon
Posts: 14827
Rifleman1776
03-19-18 09:58 AM - Post#1675074    

    In response to tenngun

Yes, it is often a matter of being used to the cold. Some people seem completely resistant to cold weather. I am always amazed to see people in tee-shirts during cold weather when most, including myself, are bundled up in heavy coats.

 
tenngun 
Cannon
Posts: 8045
tenngun
03-19-18 01:20 PM - Post#1675098    

    In response to Rifleman1776

Went to see some relatives in Wisconsin one June. They asked me to man the outside grill at a dinner, as it was too hot to get near the fire. I was happy to as at the time I was thinking about putting on a sweater.
They opened the town pool that week, something that in the south we do wait until the ice is melted.
Yes what conditions your used to living in makes a big difference.

Edited by tenngun on 03-19-18 01:20 PM. Reason for edit: No reason given.

 
smo 
70 Cal.
Posts: 4062
smo
03-20-18 11:57 AM - Post#1675258    

    In response to Stophel

  • Stophel Said:
We, of course, tend to want the thickest, fullest, tightest blanket possible. And we can literally search the globe to find it with only a few mouse clicks. I'm sure they would have liked that too 200+ years ago, but my own belief is that they were pretty limited in the quality of blankets available. We demand impenetrable armor against the cold... they were happy to get whatever they could get.

From what I have seen, the average 18th century blanket was little different from the average (or even poor) 20th century blanket. Perhaps somewhat coarse, not really all that fulled, not really all that fluffy, not really all that dense. Granted, the existing old blankets may have lost some of their nap and fullness, but take a look at these and you'll see they're definitely not broadcloth (which WAS heavily fulled and dense). Some of these don't look too terribly bad, but some look downright flimsy. My impression (right or wrong?) is that the Dutch blankets may have been considered generally superior.

https://www.scribd.com/document/288097548/Bedding-Blankets







Great info Thanks for posting
Good Luck & Good Shootin'
Smo


 
 Page 2 of 2 <12
Icon Legend Permissions Topic Options
Print Topic


2497 Views
Welcome Guest...
Enter your Login Name and password to login. If you do not have a username you can register one here

Login Name

Password

Remember me. Help



Login Not Working?...

Registered Members
Total: 32199
Todays
Birthdays
10-21GoodCheer
10-21Mike in GH
10-21Pablom
Current Quote
"Patriotism is not short, frenzied outbursts of emotion, but the tranquil and steady dedication of a lifetime."
~ Adlai E. Stevenson

PRIVACY POLICY
FusionBB™ Version 3.0 FINAL | ©2003-2010 InteractivePHP, Inc.
Execution time: 0.26 seconds.   Total Queries: 53  
All times are (GMT-5). Current time is 02:49 AM
Top