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Tennessee.45 
40 Cal.
Posts: 115
04-27-17 02:31 PM - Post#1626568    


I'm thinking about putting together a Ranger impression (not Rogers) during the F&I war what would the correct uniform be? Is it still a green regimental or would a hunter frock be appropriate?

 
Ranger1759 
40 Cal.
Posts: 397
04-27-17 04:45 PM - Post#1626591    

    In response to Tennessee.45

Whatever they were wearing at the time they were recruited....most were common men...the coy I'm with, Spikeman's Company, were recruited from the docks in Boston....they were not issued much....and fought in the clothing on there backs....

 
satx78247 
Cannon
Posts: 6208
04-27-17 10:29 PM - Post#1626656    

    In response to Tennessee.45

From the earliest days of the Colonial wars to the Spanish-American War it was quite common to "soldier" as a militiaman to serve his city/county/parish/State in whatever uniform that an individual chose to wear, IF he had anything that vaguely resembled a uniform.

According to LT Jack Pershing (later GEN "Blackjack" Pershing) some FL militia showed up in "leftover Butternut" from TWBTS era.
Those militiamen were NOT "told to go home" & some evidently went to Cuba & fought with the various volunteer companies.
(The "local volunteers" may or may NOT have been issued USVT uniforms in Cuba.- As far as I can tell there simply aren't any "clothing issue records" extant, so they may well not have ever been issued uniform items.)

Stephen Crane, author of THE RED BADGE OF COURAGE, (and a childhood friend of his, who acted as an escort & "combat photographer") went to Cuba as a war correspondent with THE NY POST newspaper & reported that: The only thing uniform about the attire of the volunteers was it's lack of uniformity.

yours, satx


 
Elnathan 
50 Cal.
Posts: 1265
04-29-17 08:01 AM - Post#1626808    

    In response to Tennessee.45

  • Tennessee.45 Said:
I'm thinking about putting together a Ranger impression (not Rogers) during the F&I war what would the correct uniform be? Is it still a green regimental or would a hunter frock be appropriate?



I know nothin', but I suspect neither would be appropriate. I'm not aware of any unit other than Roger's wearing a green uniform, and I don't believe that the hunting shirt has been demonstrated to have been around as early as the F and I war.

I think your best bet would be to figure out what particular ranging company you are trying to portray and go from there.

 
Mike payne 
36 Cal.
Posts: 54
04-30-17 05:52 AM - Post#1626923    

    In response to Elnathan

I have read that Prestons Co. of rangers from the McDowell area of the western side of the Shenandoah Valley wore early a early form of hunting shirt. I believe it was in the 1750s.

Mike

 
Artificer 
Cannon
Posts: 7684
04-30-17 02:10 PM - Post#1626979    

    In response to Tennessee.45

  • Elnathan Said:


I think your best bet would be to figure out what particular ranging company you are trying to portray and go from there.



Very sound advice, there.


If you are thinking of doing a Virginia Ranger, here are some quotes you may find very useful.

The Indians discover our parties by the track of their shoes. It would be a good thing to have shoe-packs or moccasins for the scouts.”
COL Adam Stephen to COL Washington, 27 September 1755

“I am very much surprised to hear the great irregularities which were allowed of in your Camp. The Rum, although sold by Joseph Coombs, I am credibly informed, is your property. There are continual complaints to me of the misbehavior of your Wife; who I am told sows sedition among the men, and is chief of every mutiny. If she is not immediately sent from the Camp, or I hear any more complaints of such irregular behavior upon my arrival there; I shall take care to drive her out myself, and suspend you. It is impossible to get clothing here for your men. I think none so proper for Rangers as Match-coats; therefore would advise you to procure them. Those who have not received clothing, for the future will receive their full pay without stoppages; and those already made, will be repaid them. Those who have been clothed must either return them or allow stoppages. “
COL Washington to CPT John Ashby at Winchester, 28 December, 1755.

As to those fifty suits delivered Colonel Fairfax for the Rangers I have no cognizance of them; they were delivered by himself, Colonel Martin, Lord Fairfax, and the Officers of the said Rangers with the greatest irregularity; as indeed some other of the public Stores have been by their order's; such as ammunition &c.
COL Washington to LT GOV Dinwiddie at Alexandria, 2 February, 1756.

“The incorporating of the Rangers in the Regiment will be very agreeable, if done with their consent, and I hope by arguments you may prevail on them, for the fund appropriated for paying them as Rangers is exhausted; they will now receive 8d. a day and a suit of clothes as soon as they arrive, without paying for them.”
LT GOV Dinwiddie to COL George Washington, 19 August 1756

Gus

 
Black Hand 
Cannon
Posts: 7626
Black Hand
04-30-17 04:52 PM - Post#1627006    

    In response to Artificer

“kind of armour, being peculiar to America:” The American Hunting Shirt - Neal Hurst
https://digitalarchive.wm.edu/handle/10288/18158

 
Wes/Tex 
Cannon
Posts: 7787
Wes/Tex
04-30-17 09:50 PM - Post#1627048    

    In response to Tennessee.45

All depends on who and when. Most common would probably been green, grey, brown or reddish brown. Goreham's Rangers were even issued captured French coats at one point in 1755, which would have been an unbleached wool and definitely a soft white color! Lots of possibilities!

 
Loyalist Dave 
Cannon
Posts: 6853
Loyalist Dave
05-02-17 07:51 AM - Post#1627268    

    In response to Tennessee.45

"
July 10th, 1755...,
[Governor Sharpe to Dinwiddie}

..., I shall endeavour to regulate our Militia as well as the Law will support me in doing & I hope I shall be able to draft & form a Company of Eighty out of them to range on our Extreme Borders to protect the Frontiers; provisions I shall order to be impressed where it can be found, & for Subsistance they must trust to the Generosity of some future & more benevolent Assembly. I intend to go to Frederickton
[Frederick Town, now Frederick, MD] next week to review the Militia & the Company of Rangers therefrom to be drafted before they march.

So in Maryland they are first using volunteers from the ranks of soldiers, probably in red uniforms, to become rangers.


Saturday Morning, 2d October, 1756.

On Motion, Resolved, That 300 Men be kept in Pay. to range on the Western Frontier, at the Expence of this Province, until the 10th Day of April next.


Here they increase the number of Rangers, but no mention of clothes, BUT they do get into the details later in the records...,

"By the Committee appointed by the Honourable the Lower House of Assembly to make an Estimate of the Cost of Arms and Ammunition, for the Use of this Province, and the Expence of raising and supporting 100 Men for the Defence of the Western Frontier, until the 10th Day of April, 1757.

The following Estimate is made and submitted to the Consideration of the Honourable House.

100 Muskets, Bayonets,Belts, and Cartouch-Boxes,

100 Ibs. Powder,

100 lbs. Barr Lead,

Casting Moulds for the 100 Muskets,

Provisions for 100 Men 160 Days,

97 Blankets

97 knapsacks

Kettles, Spoons, Bowls, and Knives,

Cloathing, consisting of a Coat, a Pair of Breeches, 1 Pair of Stockings, 1 Hat, 1 Shirt, and 1 Pair of Shoes, for 97 Men,"


So they are back to the 100 rangers (they also authorized 200 standard troops) and IF they drew these fellows from uniformed ranks, WHY would they provide "coats", which the soldiers would already have? On the other hand, WHY provide coats to civilians as militia when they already have them, OR is this an indication that a different coat (perhaps a different color) was to be issued ??? (The list also shows equipment issued to the Rangers.)

Then we find that the British commander is commandeering the Maryland uniformed troops from the frontier, and the governor has a contingency plan if he cannot convince the British Lord not to take all the men from the Maryland frontier, to supplement the frontier garrison with militia..., who would have been in civilian attire....,

[Sharpe to Denny.] 27th of Nov 1757.
..., I presume you know that His Ldp has been determined to undertake this Journey at least sooner than he otherwise would by the Resolution of the Assembly of this Province to have our Provincial Troops immediately withdrawn from Fort Cumberland & to reduce them forthwith to 300 Men that number being in their opinion as many as are necessary for the Defence of this Province & the Protection of our Frontier Inhabitants & lest the Earl of Loudoun should not know how to dispose of them...,
..., I suppose the Event will be that I shall find myself under a necessity of obliging three or four Companies of Militia to march & serve on our Frontiers instead of the Soldiers that are now there & in this Expectation I have already ordered that Number to hold themselves in readiness to move on the first notice.



Apparently, additional Rangers were needed, either because enlistments had expired, or the British did take the men...,

Saturday April 7th 1759

Resolved, That 100 Men be raised, to act as Rangers, for the Protection of the Inhabitants on the Western Frontier of this Province.

Resolved, That the Sum of £5 Bounty Money be paid, out of the Supplies to be raised, to each ablebodied Man who shall voluntarily enlist to act as a Ranger, for the Protection of the Inhabitants on the Western Frontier of this Province. "


So..., it seems that the first Rangers in Maryland, were taken from the ranks of men already enlisted in the pay of the colony, AND that they were issued coats. One could surmise that these were different from the uniformed coats already issued to those 100 (well 97 men with 88 of them privates). Later, the colony is raising 100 more men, and paying a bounty, but no mention of uniforms.

So you could, IF you come from Maryland, have a military style coat, perhaps madder red though brown or gray would be possible and cheap (back then), and might have marched with the British forces out of Maryland, OR...,

..., you could simply be in civilian attire, coming from the civilian population, and be posted as a Ranger replacement on the Maryland frontier....


Wes/Tex is quite correct, other colonies may differ, but this is one "model" of how Rangers were clothed and equipped. Good luck to you.

LD

 
colmoultrie 
50 Cal.
Posts: 1489
05-02-17 12:41 PM - Post#1627300    

    In response to Loyalist Dave

Here's one uniformed unit from New Jersey, Dunn's Co.:
From: “Full Text of the Votes & Proceedings of the General Assembly of the Province of New Jersey, 1757” http://www.archive.org/stream/votesproceedings1754newj/votes...

That One Hundred Men, Officers included, be immediately raised in this Colony, to be employed as Rangers during the Winter Season, as his Excellency the Earl of Loudoun shall direct: ; and that said Company of Rangers consist of a Captain, two Lieutenants, four Serjeants, four Corporals, and Eighty-Nine private Men : And that the Wages to be allowed to each Commissioned and Non-commissioned Officer, and Soldier, be as follows, viz. The Captain Six Shillings per Day ; each Lieutenant Five Shillings per Day ; each Serjeant Four Shillings per Day, and each Corporal Three Shillings and Sixpence per Day, and each private Soldier Three Shillings per Day. And that each Officer and Soldier, be furnished at the Expence of this Colony, with a good Blanket, a Half-thick
Under- Jacket, a Kersey Jacket lapell'd, Buckskin Breeches, two Check Shirts, two Pair of Shoes, and two Pair of Stockings, and a Leather Cap, and a Hatchet : And that the Captain (lull have Twenty Shillings, for
each private Soldier he shall inlist in this Service, to be retained till the First
of April next.


 
Rich Pierce 
70 Cal.
Posts: 4228
05-03-17 12:39 PM - Post#1627434    

    In response to colmoultrie

Excellent, thanks!

 
crockett 
Cannon
Posts: 6351
07-07-17 10:11 AM - Post#1635638    

    In response to Tennessee.45

There may be some gray areas such as if a unit was a true ranger unit or local militia sent into service.
Here is a source:
http://www.gissar.org/pages/uniforms.htm
If you are in Tenn. I'd think Isaac Shelby would be a good persona.

 
Karl Helweg 
40 Cal.
Posts: 272
Karl Helweg
07-12-17 11:58 AM - Post#1636408    

    In response to Tennessee.45

Do you live close enough to attend events at http://tnstateparks.com/parks/about/sycamore-shoals ?
The F&I side of the Company of Overmountain Men was "Hardin's Rangers." This was may old unit when I lived there. These gentlemen have decades of resources and would be happy to help. Some of what they used as an inspector general's accounts of the colonial militia. He apparently was not impressed with the "brown & green ranger uniforms." but these are the sorts of materials that they can provide.

I heard of a Butler's Rangers unit showing up to Mansker's Station(?) http://butlersrangers.com/

I have an English account stating that the Queen's Rangers were at Kings Mountain http://thequeensrangers.us/join/ (Which runs contrary to claim of never losing a battle. )

Hopefully these reenactors can help provide you with more details and maybe even some horsetraded gear.

 
Loyalist Dave 
Cannon
Posts: 6853
Loyalist Dave
07-13-17 10:11 AM - Post#1636501    

    In response to Karl Helweg

  • Quote:
I heard of a Butler's Rangers unit showing up to Mansker's Station(?)

I have an English account stating that the Queen's Rangers were at Kings Mountain



Well you need to be careful with both Butler's Rangers and The Queen's Rangers as to uniforms, since they are both AWI regiments, and the uniform coat underwent a big change between the F&I and the AWI.

 
Karl Helweg 
40 Cal.
Posts: 272
Karl Helweg
07-26-17 05:04 PM - Post#1638083    

    In response to Loyalist Dave

  • Loyalist Dave Said:
  • Quote:
I heard of a Butler's Rangers unit showing up to Mansker's Station(?)

I have an English account stating that the Queen's Rangers were at Kings Mountain



Well you need to be careful with both Butler's Rangers and The Queen's Rangers as to uniforms, since they are both AWI regiments, and the uniform coat underwent a big change between the F&I and the AWI.



OK, yeah. Still wouldn't hurt too much to pick their brains.


 
billraby 
32 Cal.
Posts: 44
08-07-18 10:55 PM - Post#1696630    

    In response to Tennessee.45

Depends on the officer in charge. They wore what they had on when recruited. It was quite common for them to start dressing about the same as the Indians once they got out in the wild. Just more practical. Some groups Pretty much just wore loincloths in the summer months. A lot of officers considered this unseemly and would have them dress a bit more civilized. The French tended to be a lot more likely to go native.

 
tenngun 
Cannon
Posts: 7913
tenngun
08-10-18 11:27 AM - Post#1697072    

    In response to Loyalist Dave

Isn’t it interesting that powder and ball were 1:1, or that there was just a dozen shots or so of lead.
Then 97 blankets???? Three guys not getting a blanket, or a knapsack hmmm,
Also note the check shirts. Shirts were considered under Clothing at the time. A working man might be in public with just a shirt on, sailors and some times farmers are shown this way. However this bespeaks of a shirt made to be seen.

Edited by tenngun on 08-10-18 11:33 AM. Reason for edit: No reason given.

 
Artificer 
Cannon
Posts: 7684
08-10-18 01:51 PM - Post#1697097    

    In response to tenngun

100 Ibs. Powder x 7,000 grains per pound equals 700,000 grains.
700,000 grains divided by 165 grains for a FIW period Musket cartridge load equals 4,242 typical period Musket loads/cartridges.


100 lbs. Barr Lead x 15 Balls per pound (Actual Average Size of Brown Bess Musket Balls excavated throughout the colonies according to Hamilton) equals 1,500 Musket balls. For 100 men, that’s only balls for 15 cartridges each.

Also, that leaves around 65 pounds of powder for which there would be no Balls. Because powder came in 100 lb. barrels, did they just decide to buy a barrel of powder to send and more lead later on as needed? (Not sure, but I don’t think Rangers had Artillery to use the other powder, did they?)

Gus


 
tenngun 
Cannon
Posts: 7913
tenngun
08-10-18 08:39 PM - Post#1697150    

    In response to Artificer

Sometimes you see 25 shots per pound, but even there there is a lot more powder then ball. I would hate to depend on recovering ball on the trail to have ball to shoot.


 
Loyalist Dave 
Cannon
Posts: 6853
Loyalist Dave
08-11-18 07:17 AM - Post#1697196    

    In response to tenngun

I think that in the 100 man company the captain and two other officers, either two lieutenants or a lieutenant and an ensign, were expected to supply their own gear.

As for the ratio, remember the possibility that the folks in Annapolis messed up. I've seen civilian lists of lead and powder going out on hide hunting expeditions, and it's normally 2:1, SO maybe it should have either been 200 lbs. of lead, or 50 lbs. powder ???

LD

 
tenngun 
Cannon
Posts: 7913
tenngun
08-11-18 10:45 AM - Post#1697227    

    In response to Loyalist Dave

That’s a possibility, sometimes folks were a little sloppy in note keeping. Also there was the ‘purses pound’ , the tendency to issue less then was charged for, and the suppliers sold off the extra privately.

 
Artificer 
Cannon
Posts: 7684
08-11-18 11:53 AM - Post#1697238    

    In response to Loyalist Dave

  • Loyalist Dave Said:


As for the ratio, remember the possibility that the folks in Annapolis messed up.

LD



Dave, that is a very good point. A Clerk or a Supply Officer/Official back in Annapolis may well not have known what was a good ratio of lead to powder and/or the order just got messed up. We sometimes forget that just because we have original documentation, it may have been a mistake at the time. So it is always best to get at least two or three bits of documentation, if we can.

Gus

 
Mad Irish Jack ODonnell 
40 Cal.
Posts: 493
Mad Irish Jack ODonnell
08-27-18 11:00 AM - Post#1699923    

    In response to Tennessee.45

Tenn 45,
My unit, ROC,
(https://rangersoftheohiocompany.shutterfly.com/ ) has many answers on our site. We are men, with some military and service as rangers, as well as others (civilians) working as surveyors, laborers, teamsters etc., for the Ohio Trade company of VA. The Ohio Comp. was a land speculating group of wealthy Virginians, Gov. Dinwiddey, the Washington brothers, etc. The VA House of Burgess wanted the Ohio country to be explored for westward expansion etc. Our site describes appearances (clothing and equipage)as well as some of our history. FYI

 
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