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Login Name Post: Tulle fusil de chasse        (Topic#273119)
Cap Smacker 
40 Cal.
Posts: 237
Cap Smacker
09-28-12 04:40 PM - Post#1195869    


hey guys, i know this has probably been asked before, but here goes: when it comes to a fusil de chase kit, given 3 choices, 1: TOW 2: R.E. Davis 3: Pecatonica, which one would reccomend to build.... something as close to being PC as possible for that particular gun?

 
Swampy 
Cannon
Posts: 15602
Swampy
09-28-12 05:03 PM - Post#1195882    

    In response to Cap Smacker

None of the above, although I would think seriously on the R.E.Davis French "Fine Fusil" Kit if I couldn't get parts for a Chasse from the Rifle Shop.....


 
Dansbess 
36 Cal.
Posts: 59
09-28-12 06:50 PM - Post#1195918    

    In response to Cap Smacker

Tracks barrel is too heavy..
if your building one, get larry zorns barrel. GREAT Barrel, and light too. Hardware is up to you. Track, or rifle shop is my 1st choice.

 
alex efremenko 
40 Cal.
Posts: 372
09-28-12 07:18 PM - Post#1195932    

    In response to Dansbess

Larry's are too short.You want one 44-46".
Get a barrel made from off an origial.Thats what I do now.

 
alex efremenko 
40 Cal.
Posts: 372
09-28-12 07:23 PM - Post#1195935    

    In response to alex efremenko

Or.........you can reshape the barrel[lose the taper,shorten the octagon section]but then you'll need a new stock.
Seriously,reshape the barrel,get a piece of proper wood,send it to Knob Mountain[Dave has 2-4 French patterns]And then youll be statred.

 
kmeyer 
40 Cal.
Posts: 188
09-28-12 09:02 PM - Post#1195994    

    In response to alex efremenko

I can only speak for the Pecatonica, but I love mine.

http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v719/kmeyer9/Guns/62cal%20...

 
jdkerstetter 
69 Cal.
Posts: 3029
jdkerstetter
09-28-12 09:13 PM - Post#1196001    

    In response to kmeyer

Everybody is talkin' barrels and nobody has mentioned the wood. I don't know of anybody offering French guns in European Walnut. Anybody??? I know Dave Keck will make dupe a stock out of whatever wood you want but what about the kit suppliers out there?

J.D.

 
War Hawk 
45 Cal.
Posts: 587
09-28-12 11:19 PM - Post#1196042    

    In response to jdkerstetter

I really want a FDC but I have heard the can be tough on your cheek bone, is there any truth to that?

 
alex efremenko 
40 Cal.
Posts: 372
09-29-12 06:39 AM - Post#1196080    

    In response to jdkerstetter

Suppliers & parts sets;not to my knowledge.
Hers one i just finished in euro pean Walnut:


Nothing fancy,a couple things on it I'm not happy about.But thats just between me & the gun....

 
wattlebuster 
69 Cal.
Posts: 3523
wattlebuster
09-29-12 07:14 AM - Post#1196084    

    In response to alex efremenko

I like it Alex. Specialy the metal finish
Nothing beats the feel of a handmade southern iron mounted flintlock on a fine frosty morning


 
Rich Pierce 
70 Cal.
Posts: 4109
09-29-12 12:23 PM - Post#1196172    

    In response to wattlebuster

Alex, that stock has great color and tone. Is that the "Jack Haugh 1750" Davis lock?

 
alex efremenko 
40 Cal.
Posts: 372
09-29-12 02:41 PM - Post#1196190    

    In response to Rich Pierce

Thanks, Its 'almost' the color Ive been wanting for a while. The metal was finished with cold blue and bleach misting.i let it sit about a week with an spritz of bleach every day or so. It got quite aggressive.atfer a season or two of use it will age pretty well. It is the RE Davis French lock.i couldnt wait for the new TOW one I'd ordered.I wish i waited.I'll use it on the next one.

Thanks all.

 
wahkahchim 
45 Cal.
Posts: 579
09-29-12 11:06 PM - Post#1196278    

    In response to alex efremenko

Alex do you ever make them browned and is that historically accurate? And did they ever use anything like a 12 gauge barrel or is .62 the most accurate modern alternative? I shoot my .62 Tulle Fusil and have no face-bashing at all. In fact it's one of the most easy-shooting guns I've tried.

 
alex efremenko 
40 Cal.
Posts: 372
09-30-12 12:10 AM - Post#1196289    

    In response to wahkahchim

I myself do not "brown" The FDC's I have built,or do I like to. I recall reading the term "well filed" somewhere. It'll turn brown soon enough[its called rust] with normal usage.At least the way I use them.
Most FDC's were around .600-.620 caliber ,give or take. I have two Tulle barrels that go around .630" and a St. E. barrel that goes around .650". There is a St. E FDC in the Parks CA collection that has a bore size of .660" But that was probably the exception more than the rule


 
1601phill 
62 Cal.
Posts: 2816
09-30-12 12:15 AM - Post#1196290    

    In response to alex efremenko

That is a job well done

 
Supercracker 
54 Cal.
Posts: 1791
Supercracker
10-01-12 01:11 PM - Post#1196733    

    In response to 1601phill

Alex. Would you happen to have a picture of the RR entry thimble? I'm helping a friend finish up his Tulle and I can't find a good view of how the junction of the upper and lower forestock is shaped.
"Crackers differ from savages only in their color, language and superiority of their depraved cunning"-Gov Zespedes 1780


 
alex efremenko 
40 Cal.
Posts: 372
10-01-12 06:14 PM - Post#1196830    

    In response to Supercracker


Heres one off another gun.Nothing fanct ,just a smooth transition from the EP forward.



 
CrackStock 
69 Cal.
Posts: 3015
10-01-12 09:58 PM - Post#1196921    

    In response to Cap Smacker

I know that you suggested a couple of sources, but I would like to mention that I saw a great Tulle (Actually, he calls it a St Etienne, but it is clearly a De Chasse) at Tip Curtis' shop recently. It "pointed" better than any French gun that I have ever handled. Available in several stages. My buddy bought the one that I handled on the spot while I was still justifying the purchase of a second early French musket and thinking how I was going to smuggle it home. Now, I am still kicking myself for letting it get away from me while it was still in my hand.



I suggest that you give him a call and just explain exactly what you want.

CS

 
wahkahchim 
45 Cal.
Posts: 579
10-01-12 10:11 PM - Post#1196928    

    In response to CrackStock

Good to know Alex! Thank you.

 
Okwaho 
54 Cal.
Posts: 1864
10-02-12 08:59 AM - Post#1197008    

    In response to CrackStock

  • CrackStock Said:
I know that you suggested a couple of sources, but I would like to mention that I saw a great Tulle (Actually, he calls it a St Etienne, but it is clearly a De Chasse) at Tip Curtis' shop recently.

The term Fusil de chasse applies to the gun; the terms Tulle and St. Etienne apply to those two manufacturers. Both of them as well as others produced Fusils de chasse with Tulle probably producing more than the others.Without markings it can sometimes be difficult to tell them apart.

Tom Patton


 
Supercracker 
54 Cal.
Posts: 1791
Supercracker
10-02-12 09:09 AM - Post#1197010    

    In response to alex efremenko

Thanks a bunch. I inletted the thimbles last night and plan to do the final fine shaping and pre wood finish clean up tonight.
"Crackers differ from savages only in their color, language and superiority of their depraved cunning"-Gov Zespedes 1780


 
CrackStock 
69 Cal.
Posts: 3015
10-02-12 10:44 PM - Post#1197272    

    In response to Okwaho

As usual, you are right on the money. St Etienne, Tulle, Charleville and Maubeuge were all manufacturing sites where French arms/muskets were made.

What we hear termed a "Tulle" is like calling all soft drinks Cokes. Not exactly accurate, but most people get the idea in spite of the incorrect usage. I think that what most people actually mean is a de Chasse or hunting model of fusil fin rather than a true military musket.

I was throwing out the name so he can shorten the conversation when calling.

Now maybe you can help me with a question. I struggle with the differences between the Ordinaire and de Chasse.

By the way, you might want to take a look at one of Tip's new pattern French whatchmacallit guns. Whatever it is points quite impressively.

CS

 
Keb 
45 Cal.
Posts: 980
Keb
10-03-12 08:06 AM - Post#1197343    

    In response to Cap Smacker

I just finished a French fusil from the Mold & Gun shop. I picked this kit gun up from a fella who bought it & later had second thoughts about building a gun. It has a 42" barrel and a banana lock from M&G. The pre-carved stock is black walnut. It loosely resembles a St. 18 (Saint Etienne) Fusil De Chasse in Gladysz book (pg. 81-83) except it has brass mounts & a shorter barrel. I shaved the pied de vache so it's mostly a straight line, toe & comb. It's far from perfect and has it's short comings. I'd not make another one because of the available parts today.




 
Okwaho 
54 Cal.
Posts: 1864
10-05-12 09:46 AM - Post#1198074    

    In response to CrackStock

  • CrackStock Said:
As usual, you are right on the money. St Etienne, Tulle, Charleville and Maubeuge were all manufacturing sites where French arms/muskets were made.

What we hear termed a "Tulle" is like calling all soft drinks Cokes. Not exactly accurate, but most people get the idea in spite of the incorrect usage. I think that what most people actually mean is a de Chasse or hunting model of fusil fin rather than a true military musket.

I was throwing out the name so he can shorten the conversation when calling.

Now maybe you can help me with a question. I struggle with the differences between the Ordinaire and de Chasse.

By the way, you might want to take a look at one of Tip's new pattern French whatchmacallit guns. Whatever it is points quite impressively.

CS



Crackstop,sorry to be late responding about the Ordinaire-Grenadier dichotomy.The terms ordinaire and grenadier were applied to marine muskets for 1696,1716,1729,and 1734. The primary difference between the ordinaires and the grenadairs is that the the grenadier muskets had a center sling swivel to presumably allow the grenadier to secure the musket while throwing a grenade.This terminology seems to disappear after the 1734 marine musket.Apparently it never was used after the 1717 infantry musket which was the first standard French infantry musket.Remender that there is a difference between the marine muskets and the standard infantry muskets.

The Fusil de chasse{musket for hunting} on the other hand was a civilian gun made primarily by Tulle under contract with the Ministry de la Marine although it was also made by St.Etienne and a host of other manufacturers.

In addition there were Fusils de traite {muskets for trade}made mostly by St. Etienne as well as by Liege and others.

I hope this helps.
Tom Patton





 
yakimaman 
40 Cal.
Posts: 123
10-23-12 06:23 PM - Post#1205007    

    In response to Swampy

I'm not a builder at all so am limited to what I can find on a shelf. What is thought of the fusils from A. Palyszeski? I've been looking at one that's on consignment in a local gun shop for over 6 months and the owner of the gun and I finally agreed to a price and I brought it home Saturday. Beautiful gun, unfired and almost to pretty to shoot.

rm

 
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