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Login Name Post: Colt Navy or 3rd model Dragoon?        (Topic#265606)
MU3Thompson 
Pilgrim
Posts: 2
01-22-12 04:04 PM - Post#1100082    


Greetings all! I grew up around muzzleloaders with my father's .58 caliber custom Hawkins, .36 Navy Remington and .44 Remington New Army. I have never owned my own cap and ball revolver but am ready to take the plunge into my first one. I am a fan of the Colt designs myself and am drawn to the Navy London and 3rd model Dragoon. Financially owning both is not an option at this point so I was wondering if you a could direct me in one direction or the other. I kind of like the hard hitting .44 but the history and nostalgia behind the famed Colt Navy is an attraction to a former US Navy man. Thanks!

 
Zonie 
Moderator
Posts: 25572
Zonie
01-22-12 05:36 PM - Post#1100111    

    In response to MU3Thompson

I suppose it depends on what you want to do with it but the Dragoons are all very heavy pistols.

If you intend to wear it on your hip, unless your a very large person you would find its 4 pound weight to be a bit much. These were called Horse Pistols because they were usually carried in holsters that were mounted on the saddle.

The 1851 on the other hand was designed to be carried in a holster. They are easy to shoot and their pointability is better than almost any other pistol. That's why Colt, when the company made the 1873 cartridge gun used the 1851 as the model for the grip.

If you want to combine the power of a .44 with a slightly larger grip than the 1851, give the Colt 1860 Army some consideration.
It too was designed to be carried by people rather than horses.
Just Jim...



 
dcriner 
40 Cal.
Posts: 268
01-22-12 06:18 PM - Post#1100124    

    In response to MU3Thompson

  • MU3Thompson Said:
I kind of like the hard hitting .44 but the history and nostalgia behind the famed Colt Navy is an attraction to a former US Navy man.

I share your feeling about the 1851 Navy. That's a valid reason to get one, I think.

The 1851s have a Texas naval scene rolled on the cylinder (not sure about the London model). And, .36 has come to be known as a navy caliber.

Many 1851 navys were carried by ground-pounders and cavalry in the Civil War - and later, by western gunslingers. Maybe they preferred the lighter weight, etc.

I have both a .36 Colt and a .44 Remington army. They are equally fun to shoot, with no difference in recoil that I can detect. For the .44, I have a replacement cylinder for shooting cowboy action cartridges - not sure if they are available for the .36. But personally, I prefer shooting my replica revolvers with lead balls, rather than cowboy cartridges - If I want to shoot cartridges, I'd rather use my 1911 automatic pistol.


 
Zonie 
Moderator
Posts: 25572
Zonie
01-22-12 07:02 PM - Post#1100134    

    In response to dcriner

For what it's worth, although Colt tried to get a military contract for these guns from the Navy he was not successful. The 1851 Colt Navy was called Navy because of the Texas/Mexican Navy battle that is engraved on the cylinder.
Colt originally called it a "intermediate" or "belt pistol" but after production started he too called it a Navy.

The engraving on all Colt revolvers was his method of making identification easy for the civilians buying his pistols.
There were ad's warning the buying public to make sure the cylinders are engraved to be sure the gun is an actual Colt.

This was probably a good idea because there were several companies that produced very similar pistols at the time.
Just Jim...



 
Steve Fink 
32 Cal.
Posts: 34
Steve Fink
01-22-12 07:13 PM - Post#1100140    

    In response to MU3Thompson

had a 51 navy & 2nd model dragoon (and others) before my long hiatus - time to get them all again - I think my favorite is 2nd model dragoon - like the squareback trigger guard. think I will probable get a 49 pocket model first as I didnt have one of those. anyways -

an additional consideration is the navy uses less powder and lead per shot

 
lonehunter 
58 Cal.
Posts: 2106
lonehunter
01-22-12 07:27 PM - Post#1100145    

    In response to MU3Thompson

There is really only one solution to your problem, Get them both!


 
GoodCheer 
75 Cal.
Posts: 5910
GoodCheer
01-22-12 07:27 PM - Post#1100146    

    In response to Steve Fink

If you want a shooting tool of fine design and handling get the London. If you want a big clunky powerhouse get the Dragoon.

 
AlanA 
40 Cal.
Posts: 451
AlanA
01-22-12 07:31 PM - Post#1100147    

    In response to MU3Thompson

You will probably be happier shooting the Dragoon, and carrying the Navy.

 
DoubleDeuce 1 
69 Cal.
Posts: 3049
01-23-12 01:12 AM - Post#1100251    

    In response to MU3Thompson

Look at the 1851 Navy, 1860 Army and 1862 Navy. You might be heading for trouble. These things are like salted mixed nuts. You can't stop eating (collecting) them.

 
arcticap 
54 Cal.
Posts: 1519
arcticap
01-23-12 02:41 AM - Post#1100260    

    In response to MU3Thompson

If you would like a more of a bellowing
boom, larger holes in the target and the
feel of the additional raw power of the
.44 then get the Dragoon.
The larger pistols are somewhat easier
to load.





 
Cowboy2 
40 Cal.
Posts: 266
01-23-12 08:56 AM - Post#1100319    

    In response to arcticap

For what its worth, the 2nd Model Dragoon I picked up around Christmas has proven to be the smoothest running cap and ball pistol I've ever shot. But, the Navy is a close second. The former has lots of bang and smoke, and its easier to load. The second is a lot more manageable, and you don't need a pack mule to carry it through the woods. And it eats up a lot less powder, which depending on your mood, is either a good or bad thing.

 
MU3Thompson 
Pilgrim
Posts: 2
01-23-12 04:26 PM - Post#1100540    

    In response to Zonie

Actually I'm a pretty big guy - 6 ft 1. 255 lbs. I will carry it some but not all that often. I think the big boom, big hole draw is winning out!

 
Rafe Covington 
32 Cal.
Posts: 32
01-30-12 07:26 PM - Post#1103826    

    In response to MU3Thompson

I have two 2nd. Model Dragoons, both are accurate and very reliable. I generally on carry one at a time in a holster [have carried both revolvers before], they are heavy but personally prefer the power and accuracy. I have never owned a Navy Colt so have no opinion on them.

Rafe

Edited by Rafe Covington on 01-30-12 07:26 PM. Reason for edit: No reason given.

 
RGriffith 
40 Cal.
Posts: 165
RGriffith
03-10-12 03:08 AM - Post#1120407    

    In response to MU3Thompson

I don't own a Colt Navy, but I do own both an 1860 Army and a Second Model Dragoon. The smaller Army is much handier and winds up getting shot more, for sheer power the Dragoon wins hands down. With my loads, I am getting around 800 fps in the Army and 1200 fps from the Dragoon. Both of these velocities are using the same .454 round ball. I have used the Army with admirable results as a trapping gun on small to medium size game, but I consider it too light for deer. From what I understand, the navy should be suitable for this same range of game. At close range, the Dragoon gives complete passthroughs on deer with good broadside hits.

 
Cascade Pete 
40 Cal.
Posts: 315
Cascade Pete
03-10-12 03:36 AM - Post#1120410    

    In response to MU3Thompson

Many 1851 Navies were used By ground troops on both sides of the Civil War. I have owned many, and prefer them to the .44's. They are not as strong as a Remy, but easier to clean, and if maintained properly, will be accurate, and give many Years of service...

 
David Hoffman 
40 Cal.
Posts: 430
David Hoffman
03-13-12 10:43 AM - Post#1121679    

    In response to Cascade Pete

My vote is for a 61 navy

 
bob308 
45 Cal.
Posts: 967
03-13-12 12:57 PM - Post#1121728    

    In response to MU3Thompson

i would get a 60 army. it is almost as powerfull as a dragoon. it is .44. and yes the navy did use the 60 army. i saw a picture of a sailor standing guard with a 60 army with a full fluted cylinder and shoulder stock.

 
wahkahchim 
45 Cal.
Posts: 579
03-13-12 03:12 PM - Post#1121765    

    In response to bob308

I am enjoying shooting my 2nd Model Dragoon by Uberti, with full loads. Historically these guns were all over the place for most of a decade before the 1860 came on the scene, and they are genuine magnums. Lots of fun, but mine shoots about a foot high at 25 yards.

 
laufer 
45 Cal.
Posts: 513
03-17-12 11:28 PM - Post#1123425    

    In response to MU3Thompson

If you are going big, go big with Walker for the maximum bang.

 
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