Muzzleloading Forum .....


Contact - Can't Login?
Login Name Post: Flintlock rifle with "Spain" stamp on barrel        (Topic#251370)
fatdog5 
Pilgrim
Posts: 3
11-01-10 04:05 PM - Post#910608    


I purchased a used flintlock rifle today at our gunshop, very clean but it has only "Spain" stamped on top of the barrel. No other marks. For what I paid it will look fine over the fireplace if it turns out to be a lemon, but I would really like to shoot it with my grandkids. I am brand new to flintlocks.
Can anyone share any information or ideas about this rifle? thanks

 
tac 
62 Cal.
Posts: 2783
11-01-10 04:30 PM - Post#910615    

    In response to fatdog5

  • fatdog5 Said:
I purchased a used flintlock rifle today at our gunshop, very clean but it has only "Spain" stamped on top of the barrel. No other marks. For what I paid it will look fine over the fireplace if it turns out to be a lemon, but I would really like to shoot it with my grandkids. I am brand new to flintlocks.
Can anyone share any information or ideas about this rifle? thanks



Prolly made by Armas Jukar in the 1970's...not usually highly thought-of and definitely at the lower end of quality.

Leave it over the fireplace unless anybody here tells you better than me, and get a nice American-made gun.

tac
Supporter of the Cape Meares Lighthouse Restoration Fund

 
zimmerstutzen 
70 Cal.
Posts: 4674
11-01-10 04:56 PM - Post#910620    

    In response to tac

There were literally dozens of importers bringing various quality Spanish made guns into the US in the 1960's through today. Some were just veriations of others. There was Dikkar, Jukar, Ardessa, and other actual factories. The early ones were truely cheaply made. But then again there were some even lesser quality guns brought in from Belgium in the 1960's and 1970's. And some from China that were real junk. By the early 1980's there were some good quality guns made in Spain. The rifling was better and the parts were better in general. Of the cheaper guns were some long rifles with two piece stocks and brass spacers. The cheaper locks had neither a bridle or fly. There were some incredibly cheap early ones and the interior lock parts were not hardened properly and went to mush in a few shots. I had a Markwell Arms Hawken that was an incredible POS. The lock tumble broke the full cock notch off within 12 shots.

CVA sold some of the junk, as well as some of the better stuff. Traditions sold a slightly cheaper version of the same CVA models. Without a picture, it is really hard to id your gun. In addition, there were variations in models depending on what the importer wanted. Slightly better lock, slightly lesser quality finish, etc. Brass or steel furniture, There were some real classic well made guns from Spain. The CVA Squirrel rifle was a great little gun. I and a few others here have old CVA catalogues. If you can post a picture or give a better description, maybe we can be more specific.

 
fatdog5 
Pilgrim
Posts: 3
11-01-10 08:09 PM - Post#910724    

    In response to zimmerstutzen

Well it turns out this is one of the cheap split stock models with the brass spacer. The bore looks like it has never been fired, and the action seems to have plenty of spring to it.
Were these safe to shoot? If not, what does it cost to get a good "plinker" for the grandkids and I to have some fun with.
Even this cheapo is pretty neat!

 
zimmerstutzen 
70 Cal.
Posts: 4674
11-01-10 10:47 PM - Post#910775    

    In response to fatdog5

There were two different locks used on that basic model. The early flintlock was of questionable quality. The later one, even though bare bones basic was a good sparker. They are made and sold as shooters. Use an appropriate sized Eglish flint and it should be fine. Some of them had touch hole liners and some just had holes drilled through the barrel for a touch hole. Several thousand black powder fanatics started with such guns.
Other than the trigger pull they were fair hunting guns.

 
fatdog5 
Pilgrim
Posts: 3
11-02-10 06:02 AM - Post#910803    

    In response to zimmerstutzen

Thanks for the info. I think we will go ahead and try this rifle out. It will be fun and probably will lead to a better one.


 
Zonie 
Moderator
Posts: 25659
Zonie
11-02-10 04:53 PM - Post#910984    

    In response to fatdog5

Your "Made in Spain" gun is safe to shoot with real black powder.

None of the new synthetic powders like Pyrodex, Seven7seven or what'shisnames gold will work in the pan or in the barrel.

Even priming the pan with real black powder seldom sets off a main charge if it is one of these synthetic powders.

Also, when you prime the pan make sure the priming powder does not cover the vent hole in the barrel.

If the vent hole is covered by the priming powder it will produce that old "CLICKWHOOOOOOOOOOOOFF BANG" we've seen so many times in the movies.
Just Jim...



 
Icon Legend Permissions Topic Options
Print Topic


3748 Views
Welcome Guest...
Enter your Login Name and password to login. If you do not have a username you can register one here

Login Name

Password

Remember me. Help



Login Not Working?...

Registered Members
Total: 31623
Todays
Birthdays
12-18ToddBro
Current Quote
"A fanatic is one who can't change his mind and won't change the subject."
~ Sir Winston Churchill

PRIVACY POLICY
FusionBB™ Version 3.0 FINAL | ©2003-2010 InteractivePHP, Inc.
Execution time: 0.106 seconds.   Total Queries: 38  
All times are (GMT-6.0). Current time is 12:35 PM
Top