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Login Name Post: Suttlers for braziers?        (Topic#200393)
kjmillig 
36 Cal.
Posts: 96
kjmillig
12-02-06 06:20 PM - Post#339845    


Where did you get your brazier? I've seen them at Panther Primitives and James Townsend, but can't find anyone else online that sells them.

 
Ridge 
45 Cal.
Posts: 769
12-02-06 07:53 PM - Post#339893    

    In response to kjmillig

The ones that you see most commonly in camp are carried by all the major suppliers. I would add Smoke and Fire to the list for sure, but just about anyone who deals with 18th century gear and is large enough to have a mail order company sells them. I'm talking about the ones that look like a miniature grill.

There is another guy who I've been trying to find who makes much smaller unique ones. He even makes one small enough just to heat one coffee cup.

 
MattS 
36 Cal.
Posts: 85
MattS
12-03-06 12:38 PM - Post#340146    

    In response to Ridge

Crazy Crow has them at a good price:

http://www.crazycrow.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Product_Code=557...

 
Skagan 
54 Cal.
Posts: 1804
Skagan
12-04-06 08:15 PM - Post#340746    

    In response to kjmillig

Goosebay Workshop has this one: [image]http://www.goosebay-workshops.com/phy/clim/34624/iron-brazier.jpeg[/image]

 
Mike Ameling 
45 Cal.
Posts: 855
12-04-06 10:32 PM - Post#340824    

    In response to kjmillig

Almost every brazier I have seen offered for sale can at best be described as "historically inspired". If you look at pictures and paintings of originals, there are many many differences in design and construction. Some are even arc/mig/tig welded together!

There are some very good and accurate braziers being made/sold, but most people don't want to pay for the extra work and skill involved in making one that closely resembles the originals.

So you will have to make that personal choice between what is commonly accepted and what looks like the originals.

That being said, I have a "historically inspired" brazier and really like it. But I know it's far from an accurate reproduction. One of these days I will have to make a correct interpretation of a brazier - to meet that higher standard for my gear. I know better, so it's kind of hard to use that excuse for dragging it along. As they say: The Devil is in the Details!

Just my humble thoughts to share.

yhs
Mike Ameling


 
Ridge 
45 Cal.
Posts: 769
12-05-06 06:06 AM - Post#340876    

    In response to Skagan

Your pic didnt' go through, but that's the brazier I've been looking for!




Edited by Ridge on 12-05-06 06:07 AM. Reason for edit: No reason given.

 
Skagan 
54 Cal.
Posts: 1804
Skagan
12-05-06 10:05 AM - Post#340923    

    In response to Ridge

Sorry about that Chief
When I couldn't get the pic to post, I just decided to post the link, but that one failed too I guess. I'm particular to that one as well, but just don't have a use for it.
here's that link again: http://goosebay-workshops.com/MAKING-FIRE-FOOTWARMERS-BRAZIERS

Edited by Skagan on 12-05-06 10:13 AM. Reason for edit: No reason given.

 
hack 
36 Cal.
Posts: 93
12-08-06 11:01 AM - Post#342137    

    In response to kjmillig

If you are from Michigan or close by, Contact Tony Riccicci at 734-755-8715. He makes some very nice Braziers and in differant sizes and shapes.

 
Coot 
69 Cal.
Posts: 3079
12-09-06 06:41 PM - Post#342654    

    In response to kjmillig

I just got one from MT Forge (www.mtforge.com) It cost a bit more than some but it is all riveted construction & heavy gauge iron. Some less accurate braziers are arc or spot welded together which is offputting to the sharp eyed. Some of the cheapest are made of real thin metal & will not stand much use. I am going to use walnut dye on the wood handle to tone it down from natural wood. I sort of wish that the edges of the bottom plate were turned up a bit to help hold ashes in but other than that, I am happy with the product.

PS - some braziers have a metal bail handle that makes them a bit less bulky but the wood (think large metal file handle) handle will let you pick up the brazier with one hand and hold a pot on it with the other while you carry them.

 
BillinOregon 
Cannon
Posts: 6342
12-18-06 09:47 AM - Post#346276    

    In response to Coot

Say, just how much heat does a brazier put out? What can you cook on one?

 
LeatherMoose 
45 Cal.
Posts: 746
12-18-06 12:50 PM - Post#346343    

    In response to BillinOregon

They put out a lot of heat! Depending on how you fire them, they're at least the equal of a large propane ring. You'll boil a quart of water in about a minute over a good handful of hardwood sticks and some chunk charcoal.

 
Snowshoeman 
32 Cal.
Posts: 5
12-20-06 08:43 AM - Post#347110    

    In response to Coot

I recently had one of the Goosebay Braziers pictured. Be warned that this is a tabletop warming Brazier, not something you will be boiling your morning coffee over. I didn’t have much use for it, so I sold it off. It was exceptionally well made. Goosebay also makes a wonderful cast iron brazier. Check out the Keeping fire page on their website.

I have a well made brazier from Arrowhead Forge. It is heavy duty and has served me well. I did have to add some additional vent holes in the base. However, I saw a wonderful brazier that breaks down into a small box that Fort Augusta Woodworkers is selling. I plan to upgrade to this model next year.

Check out this pics:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/25083286@N00/240394053/in/set-72157594279175344/

My buddy is boiling our coffee over his model, a small round device, Ft Augusta’s is in the background.

While most of these are historically inspired, they really are one of the only ways you can have a fire in your camp area, at many of the historic sites we attend.

Regards,
Jed.
Snowshoemen.com


 
Skagan 
54 Cal.
Posts: 1804
Skagan
12-20-06 09:15 AM - Post#347119    

    In response to Snowshoeman

  • Snowshoeman Said:
I recently had one of the Goosebay Braziers pictured. Be warned that this is a tabletop warming Brazier, not something you will be boiling your morning coffee over. . . My buddy is boiling our coffee over his model, a small round device, Ft Augusta’s is in the background.
Regards,
Jed.
Snowshoemen.com


Isn't that Goosebay version called a "Chafing dish"? I figured it's only purpose in a camp setting would be as a quasi esbit stove where you'd rely more on twigs as fuel for a flame than on coals. I must admit I was intrigued by it, but not enough to pay the asking price.
I really like you friends little mini-brazier. that looks handy.


 
Mike Ameling 
45 Cal.
Posts: 855
12-20-06 10:00 AM - Post#347133    

    In response to Snowshoeman

Here's a pic of two original 18th century round braziers.


**** SAFETY NOTE ******
If you use any brazier on top of a wood table, it can/will heat up, scorch, and burn that table top - even with 5 or 6 inch tall legs. If you have it hot enough to boil water, there is a lot of heat radiating down. Now, it does take a while, but it is a hazard. An iron plate under your brazier does help slow that down. I use a couple fire bricks under mine. If you have it on the ground, it will also scorch/brown/burn the grass underneath. Use them responsibly.

If you make one of these round braziers, heavy guage stove pipe works well. But please please cut off that modern stove pipe seam and rivet it back together! It sticks out way too much when you look at it - just like arc welding them together.

Many (if not most) of the originals were made of pretty thin material - both the round and the square braziers. The thickness of stove pipe was pretty common. Many modern ones are so heavy you could put them under the wheels of your car when working underneath it! It's not necessary, and it's a lot of extra weight to pack around.

Of course, these are but my humble opinions, and best used in conjunction with your own research.

yhs
Mike Ameling


 
Mike Ameling 
45 Cal.
Posts: 855
12-20-06 11:16 PM - Post#347449    

    In response to Mike Ameling

Hi. Here are a couple pictures of an original Colonial or Rev War era brazier.




Most of the current ones being sold are much simpler and plainer.

yhs
Mike Ameling

 
Okwaho 
54 Cal.
Posts: 1864
01-02-07 03:29 PM - Post#352425    

    In response to Mike Ameling

  • Mike Ameling Said:
Here's a pic of two original 18th century round braziers.


**** SAFETY NOTE ******
If you use any brazier on top of a wood table, it can/will heat up, scorch, and burn that table top - even with 5 or 6 inch tall legs. If you have it hot enough to boil water, there is a lot of heat radiating down. Now, it does take a while, but it is a hazard. An iron plate under your brazier does help slow that down. I use a couple fire bricks under mine. If you have it on the ground, it will also scorch/brown/burn the grass underneath. Use them responsibly.

If you make one of these round braziers, heavy guage stove pipe works well. But please please cut off that modern stove pipe seam and rivet it back together! It sticks out way too much when you look at it - just like arc welding them together.

Many (if not most) of the originals were made of pretty thin material - both the round and the square braziers. The thickness of stove pipe was pretty common. Many modern ones are so heavy you could put them under the wheels of your car when working underneath it! It's not necessary, and it's a lot of extra weight to pack around.

Of course, these are but my humble opinions, and best used in conjunction with your own research.

yhs
Mike Ameling



I agree with Mike here and while I do own a brazier I seldom use it anymore because it lacks credibility for an Indian lodge.The one I have was made by a smith in Missouri I think, and it is made in two parts.The bottom is a square sheet of steel/iron with short legs and a handle upon which sits the box with a grill on top and bottom.Thus when I want to empty the ashes I just shake the top and after lifting it up carry the bottom tray to where I can dispose of the ashes.I don't know if this can be documented but I just got tired of carrying the whole contraption to where I could dump the ashes.
Tom Patton



 
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